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I still think the Nottingham Contemporary building at Weekday Cross is the easy winner for the ugliest building in town, worse than any of the concrete monstrosities of the 60s.

The location looked better even in the days when it was the black hole of the tunnel entrance leading to Victoria Station.

Like this

tunnel4.jpg

tunnel1.jpg

tunnel2.jpg

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Agreed...complete eyesore!

When seeing such designs, often wonder if the architect also resides in a monstrosity...

Rather intrigued by the elevated building, mid picture background...what can it be?

Cheers

Robt P.

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  • 5 months later...

I agree with the above comments...awful building. Had the misfortune of actually going inside to see the " art ", apart from making a good cup of coffee, it doesn't do anything for me!!

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Thank you to the kind soul who - on my behalf - has inserted a miniature copy of the 'Mona Lisa' (Leonardo da Vinci). I like it.

Art Critic Walter Pater in an essay on Leonardo (1867) described the 'Mona Lisa' as 'an illusionary example of enduring femininity, "older than the rocks among which she sits and who has been dead many times and learned the secrets of the grave." ' unionflag

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It's quite a doomy and stark construction I think. Nice enough bar though.

I've been in the place a couple of times and dislike the inside as much as I dislike the exterior. A lot of the inside is like being in the stair well of a 1960s concrete multi-storey car park, and we know how much everyone likes those.

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  • 4 months later...

I've been in the place a couple of times and dislike the inside as much as I dislike the exterior. A lot of the inside is like being in the stair well of a 1960s concrete multi-storey car park, and we know how much everyone likes those.

But does it smell of urine(being polite) :)

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  • 9 years later...

Some good views there.  In 4/12 (viaduct) can someone talk us through the buildings in the background? (the flat-topped tower, the one under construction, the one on the right with a logo, etc.)

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Does anybody know how the name, 'weekday cross' came about? from an interested person.

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Various markets during the week with a cross to mark the spot? (according to Mr Google)

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1 hour ago, The Engineer said:

 In 4/12 (viaduct) can someone talk us through the buildings in the background? 

 

E5ub7XG.jpg

As far as I can see, it goes like this.

 

I think the building under construction is this.   https://goo.gl/maps/Lg6eFTmywcnrEhpw8

 

The round-dome building is nowThe Roundhouse pub (previously part of General Hospital)   https://goo.gl/maps/2LyFiQot24Pbh1yg7

 

The tall white building in the centre is this.    https://goo.gl/maps/rZjwP2GWLH4xd4X49

 

The black and white layered block is this    https://goo.gl/maps/tvhtRCgseC3v9KTu7

 

The castellated tower on the left was part of a factory building which disappeared during the construction of Maid Marian Way.

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The round building was previously part of The Nottingham General Hospital and was, I believe, known as The Rotunda.  My great aunt, Mary Hannah Smith, nee Sparrow, died in a ward on the top floor in 1944. She was younger than I am now.

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7 hours ago, Brew said:

The hospital round tower held the Andersen wards.

I spent 3 days on ‘Hogarth’ ward when I was 16. It was one of the round wards about the second from the top. Horrible experience. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

     In reply to Beekay. The word week probably stems from weke which was a dweller/worker on a dairy farm. The word day probably stems from the word daege/daye which was feminine and referred to a dairy maid/servant. 
        As regards the cross, the last one was removed and the stone sold around 1804/5. This had supposedly been erected in the early 18th century and was either a new cross or a rebuild of an existing one. The previous one had been built or rebuild of an existing one in the early 16th century. This also appears to have replaced an earlier cross. 
        The area has been inhabited for millennia. Two hundred years before Bill the Bastard built his wooden hut on the other high ground, the Vikings were here, along with Anglo-Saxons and before them the Britons.

        Many years ago, I was led to believe that Edward I had erected the original cross, but have yet to come across any corroborating evidence. I think the original one was likely to have been a Celtic one.

        The whole area is steeped in history and bloodletting, including Robin Hood being imprisoned in a bottle shaped cave. Whether Robin Hood existed or not, the cave exists.

        A story exists of some builders digging footings for some new houses on Week Day Cross, when they entered an enormous subterranean cavern, which had ornamented pillars. Would imagine a lot of destruction has taken place over the years.

       There are also many stories of prisoners being held captive in many of these caves.

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