Were you at Berridge?


Recommended Posts

Enjoyed my lunch, thanks Jill - before reading your post!

Interesting that you mention how little we realised of the ups and downs that our teachers endured. Pip Wright, our French teacher at Long Eaton Grammar, had been a prisoner on the Burma Railway during WW2, and the experience had taken its toll. I seem to remember someone saying that he often suffered blinding headaches, and possibly recurrent nightmares. He looked careworn, old before his time (I guess he was in his 40s at the time) thin and emaciated. But he was a good teacher, and although he was one of the most gentle souls, there seemed to be virtually unanimous agreement that no-one "played up" Mr Wright.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 829
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Through this door...and it's the original, although painted black in my day...I walked with my mum one cold morning early in 1962. I was just 4 years old. The door led to Miss Smith's office and my mu

The junior entrance as it was in 1969.

Sitting on this exact spot, facing the stationery cupboard in Mr Parr's classroom, in spring 1969, I sat my 11+ exam.

Posted Images

Yes, Stephen, I too came across several former POWs of the Japanese- not at school because they were mainly female teachers but I once worked with a chap named Walter Riley (lovely man) a former policeman in Nottingham who had been in a Japanese camp. He was tall and very very thin. I remember him on one occasion- very uncharacteristically- going for the jugular of some colleague who remarked they wished they could catch beri-beri so they didn't have to come to the office. He, of course, had seen the consequences of that awful disease at first hand and, boy, did he give them a rocket for making light of it. It was heaven help you, too, if you owned a Nissan or Datsun. He'd tear you off a strip for it.

Easy to say that the war was over and we should put it behind us...those of us who weren't there...but for people like Mr Riley it would always be there, every time he closed his eyes in sleep and we can't imagine (and wouldn't wish to imagine) what that was like.

Don't wish to sound sanctimonious, but we really don't appreciate how lucky we are, do we?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jill, my dad served in Burma and India, against the Japs, and he never till his dying day, forgave them for the atrocities they did to their prisoners. He too would pay any amount to buy something British as opposed to Japanese.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

:) My dad was a very young Royal Marine when held captive in a Prisoner of War Camp controlled by the Japanese during World War11; finally released he stood guard outside the British Embassy after the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. Such memories of war and devastation at such a fragile, tender age I'm sure unsettled him for many years after.

My Grandmother's brother George was killed at Tobruk (1941); I recall as a child her positive hatred of the Germans: "they took my favourite brother away," she'd say, "I hate them". Her anger lasted all of her life.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The sad fact is that, as the late and wonderful Harry Patch said so often, wars are brought about by a few crazy men (and, yes, I'm sorry but they always ARE men) who are eventually constrained to end up sitting round a table and making peace but only after the needless death of millions of innocent people. And for what? Just a waste.

There is the point of view which says war is necessary for controlling the population and I sometimes look at 18 year old inebriates in the street, shouting their mouths off or vandalising property and I think of those 18 year old lads climbing into Spitfires with a few hours' flying experience under their belts and with a life expectancy of perhaps 20 minutes. And it ain't fair, is it?

My own grandfather often told his son (my Dad): "Never put on a uniform for this country...all you'll get is a kick in the teeth!" This was based upon his own experience of how injured servicemen were treated after The Great War.

It is always the innocent, no-axe-to-grind person who suffers as a result of war- be they British, German or any other nationality. They're all human, someone's son or brother or father and they're all mortal. 'Fight or we'll kill you'. Life has always been cheap, said she being cynical, but it appears to be true.

What I'm really trying to say is that until women are in total charge of things, this bomb-em, shoot-em, knock-em-over-the-head attitude will prevail. It's what (some) men do best.

I shall now place the steel colander over my head and take cover under the kitchen table- which used to be known as a Morrison shelter- absolutely nothing to do with a trip to the supermarket - and await Nottstalgic missiles!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anderson shelters were constructed outside. Morrison shelters were for those who had no cellar, no garden and no access to a nearby public shelter- named after Herbert Morrison.

Thatcher? Er....who?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I started Berridge Infants in 1961, but was 4 at the time... Think the parents wanted rid :) Stayed until 1968 when I progressed (or regressed) to High Pavement. Just wondering if Jill Sparrow is the 'Jill M' I remember?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Welcome nlightnd9 who is obviously one of our Berridge alumni.

I am sure I must have known you at Berridge, since you will be around the same age as me but of course, I can't identify you from your Nottstalgia name. I knew several boys who went to High Pavement: Ian Munro and Philip Walker among them. Not sure who 'Jill M' is.

Just thought that, if you are slightly older than me, the 'Jill M' could be Jill Maddern who was in the year above. I have put all my Berridge Photos on Friends Reunited, so if you want to look, you may find your mug shot on one of them...didn't we all look innocent? But then, we were! Jill Maddern appears on the 1966/7 class- with Mrs Price. You may be on there.

Keep posting. Look forward to hearing some of your memories.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...

I was at Berridge till 1961, the place on nuthall road was called berridge nuthall road annex. classes there were for art maths metal work inc bee keeping, and science. ohh and sports, it had a football pitch, and a running track at the bottom, next to the train lines.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I haven't been on this site much for ages but just found all these replies to the Berridge topic I started. There are plenty of names mentioned I recall. If the Martin Jewers (spelt) is the same one I knew he lived on the next street to me on Wordsworth Road. Had a sister Jane. Martin was very camp and was often seen clip clopping up and down in his mums shoes. Jane Topham I knew and please forgive me if I am wrong but I believe she died some years ago through illness. Charles Haskey lived on Gregory Boulevard. Nice lad who I knocked about with right though my teenage years. He went to Mundella and has or had a high position with the council. Not seen him for ages. Ian Munro I think lived at the bottom of Grimston Road when I lived at the top end although we never had much to do with each other. I have all my school photos stashed away so I'll try to dig them out. I still have the program for Aladdin we did as the Christmas play as my wife, who I didn't know at the time, 2 years younger than me, was a jewel dancer and I was a street beggar so not much change there then. There is mention of the family who lived in the house at the side of the railway footbridge Bobbers Mill. Did the lad there have a leg calliper. I seem to recall a lad wizing around on a bike with one pedal as the other leg was callipered. Seemed to do okay at it. Went over that bridge only the other day when I was at Lomax. The house is long gone although it was derelict for years and was fire damaged. The teachers I remember were Miss Smith, Miss Rogers, Mrs Bull, Mr Cook and Mr Williams. There was of course Mr Kemp who always yelled 'Waken up boy' and seemed ancient and Mr Parr. Mr Baugh was the head. Happy days. Wife and I went to Berridge last year for a look. Chap noticed us pointing etc and asked who we were. He turned out to be the head and spent a good hour of his time showing us around. Nice school and not changed that much and a very nice head although I think he was retiring or moving on.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Well well, someone else who remembers all those names so familiar to me when I was at Berridge. Yes, I remember Martin Jewers and Ian Munro and Jayne Topham. If it's true that she is no longer with us, that's a tragedy. I'll make some enquiries of friends I am still in touch with.

I think an awful lot of the area (apart from the school itself) has been razed. I prefer to remember it (in my mind's eye) as it was during a very happy childhood.

Nice to read your post. Must admit, I haven't had time to visit the site for quite a while. I'll keep my eye on it now!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think an awful lot of the area (apart from the school itself) has been razed. I prefer to remember it (in my mind's eye) as it was during a very happy childhood.

Nice to read your post. Must admit, I haven't had time to visit the site for quite a while. I'll keep my eye on it now!

What do you mean Jill. The school has not been razed. It's still there and apart from the huts gone and minor changes it's still pretty much how it was 50 years ago.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks katyjay. I re read the post and realised I had miss interpreted Jill's comment. I feel silly now.

I lived off Churchfield Lane and other than Players Factory having gone the immediate area it is much as it was. But the wider picture is all change.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My parents owned the Capitol Fisheries chippie at the junction of Churchfield Lane and Alfreton Rd.. We lived on Truro Cres behind the Capitol cinema up until 1963.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I lived off Churchfield Lane and other than Players Factory having gone the immediate area it is much as it was.

My parents owned the Capitol Fisheries chippie at the junction of Churchfield Lane and Alfreton Rd.. We lived on Truro Cres behind the Capitol cinema up until 1963.

Small world. My grandparents - on my mum's side - lived on Grimston Road which is about half way between these two. We visited there a lot in the early 1960s, so maybe I walked past letsavagoo and basfordred in the street when we were all kids.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My parents owned the Capitol Fisheries chippie at the junction of Churchfield Lane and Alfreton Rd.. We lived on Truro Cres behind the Capitol cinema up until 1963.

It is a small world. I lived on Truro Crescent for 18 years, until 14 years ago when we moved to the sticks. I am trying to place the chippy. Was it the one under the Stork Club. The bottom of Churchfield Lane was a sweet type shop on one side near the Cappo and the other was a petrol station.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, under Stork Club.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The club was in those days called The Capitol Social Club when my parents had the Capitol Fisheries ( Late 40's till 63). When things were good in the late 50's they bought the shop on the left side of the archway under the club. They turned that into a cafe for teas and light snacks. Mum ran that and dad carried on with the chippie. When I drove by the other week, I noticed Polish wording over the arch so presumably it's in their hands now. Possibly a polish club or restaurant. The area is a right 5hit hole now.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

When we were kids 1965 ish we would go under the arch and around the back to the Stork club (or whatever it may have been called) as it was a 'gentleman's' club with exotic dancers. They would have a sandwich board outside with posters of who was appearing that week. They often had bows or rosettes covering their nipples and I wondered for ages how the hell they fastened these on. Never thought of glue. The doorman would often shoo us away with cry's of you dirty little boggers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone remember Mrs Green who ran "The Library" as it was known (actually it was a stationery and fancy goods shop near to Mr Searcy's electrical shop, just up from the Stork Club. This would be in the 1950s and early 60s. She ran a private lending library (hence the name) and also sold toys, Post Office Sets (ah, yes....I loved those!) and other treasured childhood toys. She had a daughter named Wendy, after whom I was almost named. I believe Mrs Green may have had Parkinson's disease as she had a severe tremor which I noticed even though I was only a small child. There was also Mr Hobson, the chemist. A talented chap who made his own medications...which you were allowed to do in those days. Mainly water and a bit of colouring- probably a hell of a lot safer than today's offerings!

Personally, I can't bear to go near the area now. Too painful. Someone destroyed by childhood environment. Prefer to remember it as it was, in my head. Oh, dear...growing old!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I remember Wendy, we used to play together, and I think she had a younger brother. Along that row of shops was a beer off and a green grocers, a chemist where we bought chemicals to make our own fireworks, and at the far end opposite Le Grande, was a papershop.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...