Were you at Berridge?


Recommended Posts

The Dreaded Liberty Bodice Jill,..........still sends a shiver thru me,..........i had summat similar to you as a baby,..........and was the only Lad at School that wore one,loved PE and all sports at school but changing was a nightmare............but even today don't feel right without wearing a tight 'T' Shirt under my shirts.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 829
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Through this door...and it's the original, although painted black in my day...I walked with my mum one cold morning early in 1962. I was just 4 years old. The door led to Miss Smith's office and my mu

The junior entrance as it was in 1969.

Sitting on this exact spot, facing the stationery cupboard in Mr Parr's classroom, in spring 1969, I sat my 11+ exam.

Posted Images

You too, eh? I have to admit, you're the only male I've ever encountered who wore a liberty bodice! Thought they were an all female preserve! I voiced my dissatisfaction loudly every time we emerged from Ford's with new ones but mum would say I should think myself lucky as the one she had worn at my age was stuffed with cotton wool in the winter months...mum had pneumonia as a child and the insulated liberty bodice was my grandmother's response! Apparently, as the spring and summer advanced, the cotton wadding was removed by degrees until just the garment itself was left. So we should consider ourselves fortunate! It's one way of being wrapped in cotton wool!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Jill,i never met another Male who wore one,so you can imagine the 'Ribbing' i used to get............like to think it was character building,probably why i enjoy lots of Banter............

tell you what Jill if they still made em i'd wear one now on cold Winter mornings............lol.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A classmate of mine at Berridge, Alison Smith, lived in one of the Victorian houses a few doors up from Merriman's shop on Berridge Road. She was always fashionably turned out and was the object of my envy due to her perfectly straight, chic-bobbed hair. Well, just look at the unruly riot of tresses on my head! Of course I was jealous.

Alison turned up one day in a pair of shiny patent, kitten-heeled shoes with a petersham bow on the front. I was livid, covetous, GREEN with envy! Told my mother all about it at lunchtime and begged for a pair of my own. All I got was an old fashioned look.

Whilst mum bought our clothes, shoes were my father's domain and my sister and I would be marched off to Clay's footwear on Alfreton Road. They had displays of silver lurex dancing shoes in the window! I salivated over those. No chance!

"Very sensible choice, sir," the chap would wink to my father as he wrapped yet another two pairs of black, round toed, clodhoppers in a brown paper bag. To add insult to injury, he'd hammer metal segs into the soles when we got home to make them last longer.

My older sister, a Peveril pupil at the time, complained bitterly about looking and sounding like a carthorse clopping down the road. It fell on deaf ears. The response was always the same:"When you're at work and you can afford to buy your own shoes, you can wear what you like! While I'm paying, you'll have good, sensible shoes!" And thus it was!

Bet Alison Smith has corns!

  • Upvote 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Benjamin 1945, they don't make liberty bodices any more. I know this for a fact because to my everlasting shame, I made enquiries with a view to keeping warm in winter! It's all Damart these days! Most people have never heard of the liberty bodice! When I've described one, they think I'm making it up!

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah the dreaded liberty bodice. Rubber buttons and all. Vest (shimmy) next to the skin, then liberty bodice, then a full underskirt, all worn till June, no matter how warm Spring was. Cast not a clout till May is out.

  • Upvote 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Liberty Bodice.... Contradictory really. Liberty means freedom, but Bodice implies constriction. Strange.

 

I remember being told that I had a Romper Suit made out of an old parachute. Probably why I'm called FLY. LOL

  • Upvote 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

When you consider what Victorian women and children wore, the liberty bodice was precisely that...freedom from whalebone or metal stays! My grandmother wore a Spirella corset and she was a suffragette in her younger days! Perhaps I got off lightly with a liberty bodice, although my family would tell you I've inherited grandma's feminist leanings. There's no reason why you can't denigrate male chauvinism and be warm at the same time! Is there?

  • Upvote 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Last summer, I had a multi fuel stove installed which meant ordering coal for the first time in many years. This started me thinking about the coal fires in my childhood home and the coal man who brought our fuel.

His name was Mr Bill Young and he lived in Thames Street, Bulwell.

Mr Young seemed endlessly tall to me as a child as he dashed between his cream coloured lorry with sacks of coal on his leather waistcoated back which he tipped effortlessly into our cellar through the wooden hatch in the wall.

Once all the coal had been tipped, he would come into the kitchen for a cup of tea and my mother would pay him, retaining the small, square slip of paper which bore the name of his business.

My mother was very fond of Mr Young because he was reliable and my older sister thought he was incredibly dishy.

My Young made a coal delivery to our house on Saturday 30th November 1957 but he wasn't paid by my mother that day because at 5am that morning she had made a delivery of her own. Me!

So, it was my auntie who dragged the poor chap inside to look at the newborn occupant of the Moses basket. Mr Young was a bachelor and gazing at a tiny infant, even one as winsome as myself, was probably the last thing he wanted to do. The truth is possibly that my auntie, who was a stunningly good looking widow with four children, thought she would make a close assessment of our coal man with the toned physique and good looks!

Mr Young delivered our coal until 1974 when we had gas central heating installed. No more blazing fires...until now. I believe Mr Young still lives in Bulwell and is connected with its local history society which, in my book, is a very worthwhile occupation!

  • Upvote 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...

I used to wear a liberty bodice in Winter when I was at Primary School but also (horror of horrors) thick brown stockings which fastened on to it! I used to get bad chilblains in my toes so think this is why I had to wear them. I remember some of the other children calling me 'lady' because of the stockings, but don't think I was unduly damaged by the teasing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael keep this strictly to yourself and delete after reading.............but i was the only boy at school who could stand and walk on his Toes in Dancing lessons......................lol...................now delete..........

  • Upvote 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

OH NO, Michael you've let me down,you of all people,everybody's read it !!! ive even had likes and Jill Sparrow offering Therapy.............how did i get into this mess............and i did'nt even go to Berridge...............

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I started infants class 1940 .If there was an air raid the teachers would send us to the brick shelter that was built next to the gate.Still rember the fighter planes in the sky .It was from school that i was evacuated to Worksop,hated it .In the junior school about 1944 all us kids would line up for a table spoon of a vitamins and a glass of orange juice provided by the americans.In the senior school Mr milthorp would strap us for not leaning our times table , and Mr kendtick the woodwork teacher would wack us on the bum if we used the woodsaw incorectly .Mr pool? was my class teacher and my best mate was a Robert Pawley.Another class mate was Harry Devonport and Kenneth Basin.At the age of 14 i passed an exam and went to a technical school in the city so lost contact with my school mates .Any body remember the bug hole cinema on saterday afternoons on hyson green?cost sixpence to get in cowboys and indians and dan dare ,loverly stuff ,i got kicked out once for sticking a large lump of chewing gum to a girls hair to the seat in front of me .horrid boy happy days

  • Upvote 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Was it The Leno's or The Grand?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I seem to remember a Futurist somewhere along there too, but I could be mistaken.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...