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Were you at Berridge?

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This is the photo which was posted by Jill Sparrow in November 2016 but had subsequently disappeared due to Photobucket being awkward.

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I'm sure Jill will be along soon to explain everything about it.

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Yes, here we all are. Most of us were around 10 years old here. Our new member, Baznotinnotts, is standing on the right and our class teacher, Mr Chandler, on the left.

 

I'm wearing my pink dress with white collar and cuffs, from CandA, no less.

 

Many thanks, CT, for your kind offices. I have sent CT the parallel photo, showing the rest of our year, which depicts their student teacher who, I'm sure, will be known to Baz.

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Uncanny! I haven't changed at all, although I do look as though I could do with a good meal. Thanks for this!!

Barry

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I can't disagree with that. You were rather thin.

 

I often think back to Trevor Williams who only seemed to own the clothes he stood up in. He once took off his black winklepicker shoes and pointed out the holes in their soles when I was telling him about Bread and Lard Island, ie West Bridgford, where he lived.  Being from Wigan, he wasnt familiar with that term. Teachers were paid very little in those days.

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15 hours ago, Jill Sparrow said:

I have sent CT the parallel photo, showing the rest of our year, which depicts their student teacher who, I'm sure, will be known to Baz.

 

And this is the photo in question.

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Many thanks, CT.

 

Here we have

Back row from left:  Christopher Riley, Kevin Green, Ian Munro, Colin Richardson, ?, Peter Witney, Sabhjit Gill, Trevor Wigglesworth, ?

 

Next row: Kenneth Smith, Alex Smulkowski, David Webb, Susan McDermott, Jayne Topham, Georgina Roebuck, Lynn Bartle, Bernice Bond, ?, ?

 

Next row:  Jane Handfield, Kim Wyer, Alison Smith, Kim Machin, Janice Clarke, Hortense Gayle, Jocelyn Smith, ?, Jane Smith

 

Front row: Harminder Singh, Jeffrey Smith, ?, ?, ?, Geoffrey Hollington, ?, Rennival Carruthers

 

Teacher is Mr Parnham, to the right.

 

Student teacher on placement, name unknown, to the left.

 

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2 hours ago, Jill Sparrow said:

Student teacher on placement, name unknown, to the left.

Not known from, er, that guy with Eve, forget his name. Don't remember any of the teachers, except Mr. G. Chandler, who had a quick and wicked sense of humour and seemed to enjoy being at school. Something to do with 'Duke of Earl', a reference only known by those listening to Luxembourg under the sheets.

B.

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Gerald Chandler was one of my favourite teachers. I think we had a similar sense of humour!  Originally from Peterborough, I believe he still lives in Nottingham.

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I've just been leafing through my childhood autograph book. Whom should I find lurking in there, on a page all to himself? Best Wishes, Barry Watchorn.  1967.

 

Anyone know Sotheby's phone number?  It has to be worth a mint, possibly with a hole in the centre!

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16 hours ago, Jill Sparrow said:

my childhood autograph book

Do you not also have the signed photograph of me with the other Beatles, making a surprise appearance at The Beachcomber Club? Any cheques with my signature from that time are also valuable e.g. Pay Miltons Head Hotel 2 shillings and sixpence, for five nights stay. When I started full time at the chalk face my handwriting was judged to be inadequate, because the new boss insisted on everything being written in italic. As you can see from my beautiful italic writing in this reply I still have brilliant calligraphic skills.

B.

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Virtually all the. teachers at Berridge signed my autograph book, including some I never asked to do so and who never taught me: Kempy, Parr, Bartlett, Parnham and Anderson!

 

The Oscar for best handwriting goes to Mrs June Pryce. Beautiful copper plate calligraphy. Head teacher, J W Baugh's writing is very neat and fluid. Parnham's is almost illegible. Kemp's dominates the page but then he came across as fairly domineering a personality. Watchorn's is a bit loopy and untidy but quite legible.

 

 

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He's going to love being called Loopy. LOL.

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Speaking from the point of view of graphology, katyjay!  Loops can indicate a personality with something to hide! Wonder what it was?

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I should add myself to the roll call, albeit briefly.  We lived on Grundy Street and I went to Berridge infants late 1962 or early 1963 (aged about 5).  It can only have been one or two terms because we moved to Basford mid-1963.

My only recollection of Berridge was an aversion to using the outside lavs.  From time to time I would go home at afternoon playtime to use the lav there (also outdoor) and didn't return to school.  As far as I know I wasn't missed!

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Fascinating, @The Engineer. You are probably on one of the early photos and may be a child I can't name. There are a few. I would love to know what your name is so I can add it to my records. PM me if you would like to tell me who you are. Yes, those lavatories were terrifying. I think we were all quite badly scared by them. I know I was! I knew Richard Sewell who lived on Grundy Street but he was at Berridge right through the infants before moving to Highbury Vale.

 

Do you see yourself here? Possibly, front row, extreme left or back row, extreme right. Two boys I can't name and who don't appear on any later photos.

 

Made me smile at the thought of you going home at afternoon play time. Just slip out of the gate onto Brushfield Street. It was never locked. Not so today. It's now controlled by security key pads and an intercom!

 

Life was much more relaxed in 1962!

 

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1963

 

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Plastic windows and murals but little else has changed...except we've all grown up. Front row, 5th from the left is me. 6th from the left is Jane who came along on Tuesday

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The Boys seem to out number the Girls by at least 2 to 1 on that picture.

Is that just one class or the whole year?

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It's a strange photo, Stuart, as everyone on it was born during the last quarter of 1957. There is a parallel photo which shows a mix of children, some of whom were actually in the year above and some of my age. 

 

As you will know, children commence school in the term when they turn 5, or rising five, as it's known, although I began when I was 4. Many of my peers hadn't actually started Berridge when this was taken, due to being born in 1958.

 

Looking through my Berridge photos, the classes were often boy dominated. 

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Were they all told to keep their hands folded, do you think?

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Just checked and found that a couple of children on the photo were born in the first quarter of 1958, including Richard Sewell, front row, extreme right, who lived in Grundy Street and appears on the following year's photo but then left. I wonder??

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And does that photo show the whole class ?  

 

In all the infants and junior photos of my days at Clifton, the classes were much larger - usually in the high 30s and frequently a long way into the 40s.

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Same with Berridge, CT, after the initial class.  The photo shows the first class children entered. It was just play based activity, sand and water, clay and painting. As I recall, they remained in there for around a term and then moved into the room next door where more formal activities took place. The next set of rising fives then moved into the play based room.  Not until what would now be called Year One did we all occupy the same room. 

 

Matters were further complicated for children like myself, who started at 4 years and 3 months. Nowadays, I would have been in the nursery. In those days, the nursery didn't exist. Early starters were lumped together with those who were of statutory school age.

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15 hours ago, Jill Sparrow said:

Loops can indicate a personality with something to hide!

Plenty to hide, still hidden, but thoroughly cured of loops. When at college the cleaner, a lovely lady from Clifton estate,  left me a handwritten note, 'If you keep leaving your bed in such a mess, you and me are going to fall out.' She might have told me earlier.

Just been told by a certain lady she would like some guzgogs from Waitrose today. You can take the girl out of Nottingham, but you can't take Nottingham out of the girl. Her sister has lived California for over 50 years, and sounds native until she says words like cup, up, and that uh sound comes in.

This is straying into the wrong thread ...

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Nobody has ever strayed into the wrong thread before, or changed the subject, says she with tongue in cheek.

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Learning of The Engineer's aversion to the terrifying toilets in the infant playground at Berridge got me thinking about how times have changed.

 

In those days, 58 years ago, the only loos for the children were outside.  If nature called during lesson time, the teacher, the green and black striped Miss Walters, in our case would hand over one rectangle of pine-scented Izal toilet paper and instruct anyone whose bladder dared to be obeyed whilst the owner's fingers were mired in clay to go forth and run the gauntlet of the terror in the dark on t'other side of the playground.

 

As we know, the side gate was never locked. Most of the time it stood ajar,, hence the facility with which The Engineer slipped out, apparently unnoticed, during afternoon playtime, to return home.  To do so, he would have to cross Berridge Road. Can you imagine the furore today if a 5 year-old managed to do this?

 

That unguarded gate could also permit anyone, at any time, to access the playground and hide in the toilets. Child molesters are not a recent phenomenon. As if the water-spewing terror in the dark and a potential soaking were not nightmarish enough, there was the additional danger of a perverted maniac lurking in the shadows.

 

No one thought about such things in those far off times when there were buttered crumpets for tea at home (once you'd washed your hands, of course. Especially if one's fingers had gone through the sheet of wet Izal!)

 

Makes me realise what intrepid little soldiers we were.  Mind you, I will admit to presenting my mum with a bag of wet pants on several occasions at home time. After that first terrifying encounter with the self-flushing monsters, I vowed never to use them again...and I never did!

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I wasn't at Beridge but can confirm that Arno Vale Infant /Juniors had outside loos, with a covered walkway to them.

I can't remember being terrified of them, but maybe that's just blotted out in my memory.

 

Just checked Google and they're still there, although the walkway is covered on the sides now and it's Juniors only.

 

https://www.google.com/maps/@52.9936504,-1.127768,50a,35y,39.55t/data=!3m1!1e3

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