Were you at Berridge?


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Hi my names pete hillier was at berridge rd untill 1958 nickname was dick hillier remember alan wood , henshaw laurence was his matemate ,mr reid taught r/e he was 6ft 6 and had a mini plushe used to grab you m

by sideburns if you misbehaved orhis steel ruler ;also trever andtony searcy was there I lived in shirlyterrace kirkstead street on hyson green ;im 71 now hope theres some of you still alive hope for some replies someone may remember i was always walking round playground on my hands was good at it and ingym

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Through this door...and it's the original, although painted black in my day...I walked with my mum one cold morning early in 1962. I was just 4 years old. The door led to Miss Smith's office and my mu

Lovely visit to Berridge yesterday and nice to put faces to names. Planning a few things I could talk to the children about and sort out my school photos it made me realise that it was 59 years since

Yes, it was emotional. I stood outside the Brushfield Street gate earlier in the morning and the memories came gushing back of my mum who passed on 9 years ago.   Oddly, I've discovered that

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Hi my names pete hillier was at berridge rd untill 1958 nickname was dick hillier remember alan wood , henshaw laurence was his matemate ,mr reid taught r/e he was 6ft 6 and had a mini plushe used to grab you m

by sideburns if you misbehaved orhis steel ruler ;also trever andtony searcy was there I lived in shirlyterrace kirkstead street on hyson green ;im 71 now hope theres some of you still alive hope for some replies someone may remember i was always walking round playground on my hands was good at it and ingym

I am 72 and lived on Selhust St just round the corner from Kirkstead st ,I went to Berridge infants when I was 4 and wondering if anybody remembers me David Collinson ? I had a brilliant childhood and loved it at school but I was always getting the cane off the Head Mistress , (namesake ) Miss Collinson .
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Hi, My name is Douglas Stewart...... I attended Berridge Road school in the early 50s At that time my name was Douglas Bramley and our family lived on Alfreton Road. I have some good school and Pipewood Camp photo's from that time. I will try and post them . If I have no luck my e-mail is: xxxxxxxxx

Regards,

Doug.

I went to the last camp at Pipewood it would be in 1953 ,remember Mr Dibbs ?
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Christopher Riley, no less! Hello Christopher. I certainly remember you. I also remember your Mum. The last time I saw her was in Littlewoods in Nottingham many years ago. She told me you were then a DJ in Leicester, I believe?

You dad was in the army, I think? I certainly remember you keeping us all entertained at Berridge. All my school photos are on Friends Reunited now and I think you are on most of them.I am still in touch with Jane Humphreys and we often discuss Berridge Days.Let's have some of your Berridge Memories, I'd love to read them.

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I remember this lady. She wore a blue overall, had dark hair and a swarthy complexion. A lady of very few words, rather serious looking. She always told me what beautiful curly hair I had (well you can see from the photo what it was like). I hated my hair (even more so when my mother stuck a large silky bow in it) but she thought it was something to be proud of. Wonder if she'd have been so proud the day I stuck my head in a box of sawdust...no, don't ask why! I must have thought it was a good idea at the time.

My poor mother went bananas and gave me a lot of misery with a fine-toothed comb trying to remove the wood shavings from my tight curls. Actually, I think most of it is probably still in there!

I do recall the smell of the disinfectant in her little dish. Fortunately, I never had headlice. Even when I was teaching and my pupils had them, they never bothered me. This may have something to do with the fact that my paternal grandfather was the only soldier in his unit during WW1 who was never bitten by lice or fleas, even though there were as many in his uniform as everyone else's. We don't taste nice, us Sparrows!

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Hi all. Just found this site when looking up Pipewood camp where I spent 4 summers 1949/53. I was at Berridge during that period. I lived on Peverel St., where there were assorted shops and hosiery companies in those days.

I loved Pipewood. It was a wonderful escape from our house which was shared with an off license and with my bedroom overlooking the fire escape of a hosiery factory. Sounds like a glum place to live but the neighbours were respectable people in those days and life was OK.

The teachers I remember at Berridge were Mt Kendrick (woodwork), Mr (Buffalo) Cheeseman (science), Mr Jewitt (maths), Mr Roblin (all sorts), Mr Smith (head). Mr Wheatman (Tech drg) and Mr Pearce my form master who became the permanent head at Pipewood. The houses (billets) I remember at Pipewood were Hartsmere, Chetwynd, Brackenhurst and ? what was the other one?

I now live in Staffs and cycle past Pipewood occasionally. It looks so forlorn these days but the happy memories remain.

Terry Coging

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Thanks Lizie and Michael. My first memories about Berridge was the new boys initiation ceremony. I started in 1949 straight from Windley School (Forest Rd). Us newbies were told to 'run the gauntlet' or face a harsh penalty. the 'gauntlet' was the space between the woodwork shop and the iron railings on Berridge Rd. We were told to run through a double row of senior boys who thumped us on the head and shoulders. If you refused to do it they would stuff you in a dustbin and roll you down the sloping playground; a very painful experience when the dustbin handles crashed onto the tarmac. I only saw this happen once.

I often reflect on how the different teachers did their job. Mr Roblin put the fear of God into everyone and gave the strap daily. His strap was a custom jobbie with the two outer thongs removed. I remember 'Snake' Anderton being strapped so hard that both hands bled and swelled up. I can see him now sitting on the playground crying, on a cold Winters day, nursing his injured hands under his armpits. Roblin was a cruel man. Then there was 'Buffalo' Cheeseman the science master who was a kind man but the pupils wound him up so much to the point where he started charging up and down the science lab bellowing at everyone. The best teacher of all was Mr Pearce. He was a quiet man but had the gift of making lessons interesting and had no discipline issues. He was a step ahead of the wiseguys and didn't need to use the strap.

Classmates that I remember were Tony Dawkins, Paul Kreager, Trevor Davies, Albert Hurry, Bernard Lewis....a few more when I think about it.

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PeverilPeril,

I enjoyed reading your post.You mention some of your classmates, including a Trevor Davies. Would that be Trevor Davys who lived in Grundy Street? He would be around your age and I knew the various members of his large family quite well. He also attended St Stephen's Church and sang in the choir. I played the organ there in the early 1980s and am still occasionally in touch with Trevor.

I must try to persuade him to contribute to Nottstalgia as I know he'd have some good memories to share. Not sure whether Trevor went to Peveril but I think he did.

Keep posting!

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LizzieM - It probably was Paul Kreagers shop. i know that he did well in business and lived in a large, walled house near Keyworth when we lived there.

Jill Sparrow - It would be the same Trevor Davys. He was my fishing pal. Be nice to talk to him again. I am still a keen fisherman.

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PeverilPeril

Certainly sounds like the same chap. I will contact him and ask him to have a look at Nottstalgia. Trevor came from a large family, brothers, John, Barry and younger brother Andrew. Sisters Christine and Marilyn. His mother, Doris, was a lovely lady who I knew from childhood and a great friend of my mother. Trevor lived for a while in Franklin Gardens and now at Bramcote. Writes to me every Christmas. He became a teacher himself. I am sure he would love to renew his acquaintance with you.

Watch this space!!

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I left Berridge Xmas 53 which was the first year that the 15+ was offered where pupils could stay on for a year to take 'O' levels. It was a joke really and only 2 lads took the offer up. The rest of us had to start work and earn some housekeeping. I never took the 11+ due to illness but when I was 13 I was offered a place at Tech College because of my good exam marks. Like an idiot I ripped up the offer letter that I should have given to my parents. Realising my stupidity, at 14 I signed on for nightschool at the school on Carlton Hill, saying that I was 15 years old. True to type I continued to do stupid things with my education....

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  • 8 months later...

Pidge Pie...yes, Terry Hill. I've been trying to remember the name and it wouldn't surface. Poor Neville Eccles, that's horrible. He was a quiet lad, like Winsome. Yes, it makes you think when you see your peers shuffling off and realise that you're probably well over half way through your time here. It's not morbid...it's all part of life's rich tapestry and hopefully it won't put Stephen Ford off his lunch!

Terry Hill was a small lad- quite wiry- but not wiry enough to avoid the train.

I've been looking at the photo of Mrs Price's class and there is Charles Haskey on the back row. I didn't remember the name until I looked.

I went to the Berridge Centenary in 1984. The old place looked very much the same as it did when we were there. My Mum went as well because she was educated at Berridge Road Schools. I hoped to see Mr Baugh but was told he had passed away a few years earlier. Pity, I'd have liked to meet him again.

I did a bit of research re Mr Baugh and discovered that he'd been put on a ship to Canada (on his own) at the age of nine, to go and live with his grandmother. Presumably, he lost his mother when he was a child. I never really knew much about him but he probably didn't have a very easy life either. When you are children and you (probably) don't like your teachers very much, you don't stop to think that they are human too and have experienced their share of highs and lows. That realisation only comes with age and life itself teaches those lessons.

Well...that's enough philosophising for one day.

Keep the memories coming, Pidge Pie.

Jack Baugh was the head when I was at Berridge...a lovely gent..I think he lived on Ribblesdale Road in Sherwood..he used to be my Grandad Harry Cranes best friend and golfing partner...Some of the names I remember were Mrs Parrott and Mr Anderson..I was at the school from 69 to 73..then went on to Peveril..we lived on Birkin Avenue on the corner of Randle Street..

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Nice to read your post, ceeaych.

Mr Baugh, as you say, was a true gentleman. I was very fond of him and, along with Messrs Chandler and Williams, owe him a great debt. I believe he did indeed live in Ribblesdale Road and I recall he drove a white Mini in the days when teachers generally couldn't afford to run cars.

I do recall that he was unpopular with some parents for showing favouritism toward pupils and I confess I was one of them but what teacher, if they are honest, doesn't have favourites?

I remember him as a person who was fond of history, poetry and great literature and these were all subjects which fascinated me.

He was a disciplinarian, of that there is no doubt, but as he always said, there can be no self discipline without discipline first being imposed on a child, by which he meant discipline of thought and behaviour. He knew that without this it was not possible to learn, nor to achieve.

I didn't know he was a golfer but I often think of him with fondness and it is a lasting regret that I was not able to thank him in person at the Berridge centenary for his encouragement and influence on my education.

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I have been thinking about the other names mentioned by ceeaych. The name Mrs Parrott rings a bell...with a surname like mine, it should! However, I can't put a face to the name. She never taught me and may have arrived toward the end of my time at Berridge.

Mr Anderson I do recall. He first appeared with his wife around 1968. They seemed to drift around the school, working with groups. Mrs Anderson disappeared after a while but he remained. He was Scottish, small in stature, bespectacled and only seemed to possess one suit. For some reason I couldn't define, I didn't like him because he made me feel uncomfortable. It seems that he became a class teacher after I left in July 1969.

Going back to Mr Baugh,he didn't have much of a retirement as he died in 1980 in his 67th year. Seems rather unfair after a lifetime of hard work. He sometimes spoke about his son who, I presume, was his only child.

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Welcome to Nottstalgia David, glad you took the plunge. There are lots of posts from Nottstalgians who attended Berridge School, I hope you enjoy reading them and also adding your memories for us to share. :)

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