Were you at Berridge?


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The "new" Berridge was where my mother, sadly now gone, was head cook for many years. I will try and dig out some more when I am next in Nottingham. 

 

Steve Tunnicliffe is nearing 60, (I am too, at 56) Last saw him and his delightful wife* at my Mum's funeral. Steve is shorter than me but I could consider him to be stocky. It would fit. That said I am built like a racing snake. 

 

I cannot remember a Gordon Tunnicliffe. Certainly not my branch of the family. My grandfather was originally from Burton on Trent, and before his death, my Dad talked very much about the family there. He was very interested in his family history and kept many valuable documents. I have yet to get to the bottom of his quest.

 

The bottom playground at Berridge! Yes there were the remnants of air raid shelters when I was there. 

 

Mr Baugh to my recollection, was a lovely man who stunk of cigar smoke. I cannot ever recall him doing anything pervy at all. Now if you mention Mr Eric Anderson, and pervy, then certainly yes. Oh yes. A pity because he was a very good teacher. Tried to touch me in the beer garden of the Wheatsheaf pub one time. I ran to my uncle Tom (ex marine) who was nearest. I understand it was sorted out. Me and my dad were ushered out of the pub so we did not see anything. 

 

*She has helped me in some times of trouble and I owe her a lot.

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Through this door...and it's the original, although painted black in my day...I walked with my mum one cold morning early in 1962. I was just 4 years old. The door led to Miss Smith's office and my mu

Lovely visit to Berridge yesterday and nice to put faces to names. Planning a few things I could talk to the children about and sort out my school photos it made me realise that it was 59 years since

Yes, it was emotional. I stood outside the Brushfield Street gate earlier in the morning and the memories came gushing back of my mum who passed on 9 years ago.   Oddly, I've discovered that

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I know nothing about this school or the teachers but I feel uncomfortable that certain ones are being named.  They may have friends or relations who are on this site and  I would hate Nottstalgia, or certain members, to be accused of libel.

(delete this post if you want)

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Very good point Margie, I suppose when we start bringing these memories back we tend to spill out a lot of stuff to try and clear our own memories of it without thinking of others

 

Rog

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Steven Tunnicliffe was a nice lad. Quiet, shy and I can well imagine him not growing to be very tall. He was in my class virtually all the way through Berridge.

 

Mr Baugh, in my experience, was a lovely man. Strict, yes. A heavy smoker, yes. Unpopular with some of the parents, yes...He had favourites, by which I mean nothing more than that he encouraged bright children and cracked down hard (literally) on disruptives but that was the ethos of the era and both legal and acceptable. It is becoming quite common now for people to speak out about historical abuse in all its varying forms. It is something I have increasingly had dealings with in my working life and I do feel very sorry for those involved in the cases I come across. Berridge, like most other schools,was probably not immune.

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I read in one of these posts about an "air raid" shelter at Berridge school,in a book I am reading at the moment "Britannia Calls" by David Nunn. I found this picture

 

P1060153.jpg

 

Might not be of any use to anyone but is relevent to the topic I think

 

Rog

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Every so often, a fuel delivery lorry would arrive and park outside the caretaker's house on Berridge Road. A large, corrugated pipe was fed into some kind of delivery hatch and, presumably, some type of fuel was passed through it.

 

The caretaker when I was at Berridge was called David. Probably in his 30s, Brylcreamed dark hair, bit sarcastic but I've always appreciated sarcasm! He lived in the house and found plenty to do around the school. One day, some lad had thrown up in the classroom and the teacher sent me to find David who kept a bucket of sawdust and dustpan in readiness for such occasions. He was lurking in the infant playground when I located him and he said he was just about to feed the furnace. Did I want to come and watch? Anything was better than sitting in a vomit scented classroom, so I tagged along. It was quite dark and the heat was phenomenal. He'd be in trouble for that today but it was all perfectly innocent.

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Thing I didn't like, NBL were those oil fired Robin Hood boilers found in a lot of schools.  Usually there was quite a bit of electrical equipment in those boiler rooms.  When one of those boilers started up the motor often started with a loud clunk then there was an almighty whooooof!  As the oil vapor ignited.  I'm sure you know what I mean.  Needed me undies washed at night. ;)

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Know exactly what you mean Loppy if the spark generator was going down or the electrodes hadn't be cleaned correctly the thing would half fill with vapour and go off like a bomb, good job those old Beeston's could take it.

 

At that time most were conversions from coke to oil or gas, I much preferred the gas conversions they worked on about 6" water gauge so around 1/4 psi, still a lot of gas but much gentler.

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I was looking at the Berridge website recently. The school is now split over two sites but I was astounded by the sheer number of staff employed there. There are between 8-12 teaching assistants for each year! This is in addition to teachers.

 

How on earth did we manage in the 60s with just one class teacher per classroom?

 

It would be interesting to gather the thoughts of the head master from those days, Mr Baugh. I imagine he'd shake his head in disbelief. There is probably a higher number of pupils nowadays but, even so, it seems like an awful lot of staff.

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A job creation scheme no doubt. I certainly think the staff were better organised in our day, and could think for themselves.

Nowadays, everything is controlled by the hierarchy who have no concept or experience of teaching whatsoever !

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38 minutes ago, Jill Sparrow said:

I was looking at the Berridge website recently. The school is now split over two sites but I was astounded by the sheer number of staff employed there. There are between 8-12 teaching assistants for each year! This is in addition to teachers.

 

How on earth did we manage in the 60s with just one class teacher per classroom?

 

It would be interesting to gather the thoughts of the head master from those days, Mr Baugh. I imagine he'd shake his head in disbelief. There is probably a higher number of pupils nowadays but, even so, it seems like an awful lot of staff.

 

Teaching assistants are invaluable as they can do all those time consuming jobs such as preparing and clearing up after painting and craft activities in the infant school particularly, so that the teacher can get on with teaching!  The assistants can also listen to the children read as individuals or in small groups and, of course, there are some special needs children who need a named assistant to help them in the classroom and sometimes the playground situation.

  In the distant past, certain children, for example those with Down Syndrome or those who are hearing impaired, weren't educated in mainstream schools as is now the case.  These children definitely need a teaching assistant to support them.

 

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As Jill says though Margie, 'How did we manage in the 60's ? '

I'll tell you ! Kids were far more resilient, resourceful, inventive, constructive, self sufficient, thoughtful, alert and  wise.

By wise, I don't mean Street Wise as they are today, I mean wise in the context of being knowledgeable.

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Could it be that young people today aren't so well behaved as in years past,what I mean by that is different typ of discipline today,and parents attitude towards that discipline,teacher no longer seem to hold that authority figure like they used to,years ago parents had a lot of respect for the teachers because that's how they were bought up but a lot (not all) of parents today want to rebel against authority (try to get one over on the teacher or try to prove they know best) teachers today are highly trained people and only seem interested in meeting curriculum targets in order to progress through their career but the basic skill of tailoring the educational needs to the individual is lost and that is left to the assistants, I think

 

Rog

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As well as discipline and special needs issues the modern classroom is a far cry from our days of ink wells and a blackboard. Computers and various learning gadgets need attention that would distract a teacher from teaching. A teaching assistant would have been a Godsend to me as a visually impaired and slightly deaf kid. It was assumed that I was a bit dim and I was generally ignored. There was no pressure on teachers to get results then and they had the power to exercise discipline. Easy- peasy compared with the modern classroom.

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Special Needs ! Most kids require special needs nowadays. It's affectionately called 'a smack in the mouth '. 

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So, I should have had a smack in the mouth for being short sighted and deaf? I did get the strap a few time for not hearing what the teacher said. Teachers have to work a lot harder these days. Far more reports, preparation, and work during what used to be extensive holidays.

 

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I cannot believe some of the last few comments from people who have had no or little experience working in modern day schools!   I worked with hearing impaired students for 30 years in a mainstream secondary school,  and also spent a couple of years working twice a week in our local primary school after I retired.   

Teachers no longer just stand at the front to teach rows of children sitting at desks and, as I said previously, teaching assistants are needed to help individuals or groups of  children to access the information fully in a way that is right for them, either by signing, simplifying the language or using other aids to enable them to participate in the lessons.  Not all children are able to learn in the same standard way but they all deserve a chance!  

I was fortunate when I was a child at infant and junior school that I found it easy to learn, but I dare say there were others who didn't and I feel so sad to read of PP's experience of getting the strap for not hearing instructions - that is terrible.   

 

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I'm afraid I'll stick to word games as no one has a sense of humour anymore.

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You do that Fly. The awful names that you call people sometimes especially if they don't come up to your physical preferences are often very cruel and offensive. It has always been just a matter of time before you really offended someone. I wont say perhaps you should think if your opinion on something could be hurtful or insensitive, because you have made it clear you don't care. I for one can see why your post caused upset. Well done to you!

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So it's fine for several other members to be derogatory about folk is it ? 

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