Edible mushrooms?


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This year the lawn has been invaded by wild mushrooms.

They are normal mushroom colour the tops have shaggy peeling skin.

The underside is a creamy white colour. Fully open they are 5 inches across.

Can anyone identify these and if they are edible.

Photo to follow when I can find the lead for my phone?

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They look like field mushrooms to me, but do a google to positively ID them!!

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Could be amanita mushrooms........... !sickly! be careful...........lot's of different varieties all make you v' poorly

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  • 2 weeks later...

Try looking up Macrolepiota procera (Parasol Mushroom). Here's some details for you to check as a guide (from my book: Mushrooms and Toadstools of Britain and North-western Europe. Marcel Bonn. Hodder & Stoughton):

"Cap 12-25cm Umbonate with a continuous brown patch at the centre surrounded by reularly concentric scales, ochraceous beige on a paler ground. Gills creamy white. Stipe [stem] 25x2cm, slightly bulbous, 4cm across, closely zoned brownish up to a thick ring with an outer fleecy flange. Flesh pale, not reddening. Spores 13x8µm, with lens shape germ pore. Meadows, grassy places under broadleaved trees. Fairly common. Edible."

Field musrooms could be an alternative though:

Family Agaricaceae. Gills free. Spore print white or blackish bistre, occasionally

greenish or reddish. Partial veil a ring or sheathing ring.

Tribe Agariceae. Only one genus in Europe, Agaricus [Psalliora]. Spore print dark

bistre; gills pink then dark brown to blackish at maturity.

Section Agaricus. Ring complex, shaggy or doubled by a basal sheath, sometimes

like an appressed volva; flesh ± reddening.

O Agaricus campestris Linn. FIELD MUSHROOM

Cap 6-IOcm, convex, silky-fibrillose, whitish, tinged ochraceous with age, bearing

brown scales in var. squamulosa or yellowing in var. equescris. Gills crowded, bright

pink when young, then bistre, edge concolorous. Stipe 5x Icm, spindle-shaped or

attenuated, whitish, ring cottony, fugaceous. Flesh white, turning slightly pink; smell

and taste fungoid. Spores 8xSIUll, with inconspicuous germ-pore, no sterile cells on

gill edge. Pastures. Common. Edible and excellent. E3.

=========================================================================================================

Do not eat your mushrooms until you are certain of their edibility. Always keep a sample for ID when eating just in case you take ill.

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  • 4 years later...

I infected this log with Oyster mushroom spawn back in January 2014. This is the first fruiting body so far. I had all but given up on it:

DSCN2911.JPG

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One factor might be the dampness or otherwise of the log.

Last time I did that I kept the logs upright in a shady corner with their feet in an old washing up bowl which the rain kept topped up with water.

It worked, at least for Oysters. Never could get the Shii Take to appear though.

Col

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DJ360: I have some Shitakes sown too but they have failed to grow. This season I have sown some Ceps underneath my spruce trees. Fingers crossed for an autumn crop!

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  • 2 years later...

Our friends who live in Arkansas posted this horrible looking ‘mushroom’ on Facebook over the weekend.  It had sprouted up on their drive .......they live out in the sticks (despite how he looks, he’s not a hillbilly but a 747 pilot smile2)

56772371-5062-4453-_AE6_C-622_D493_A5788FBC6_A3_EF-1_FC3-43_DF-_B427-51_EB5_C8_B

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Where in Arkansas do they live Lizzie?? My wife's business is in Mammoth Spring Arkansas.

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You only want the outside 1 to 1 1/2 inch,it gets very woody as you get closer to the center, not bad pan fried in oil and butter along with some trout and spring onions, bet to pickle the chicken of the woods though and use it later in the year, some people can be affected by it though,tingling feeling in the mouth or slightly swollen lips, never tried it myself beu know people who have, no taste at all on it's own, you have to add flavour as with most fungi hence the butter,onion,fish. plenty of recipes about in veggie books etc

 

Rog

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Way north and west of us down here Lizzie...

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I think if I did that sort of thing for a living I wouldn't have enjoyed it half as much as I do but, cooking/baking is that far removed from what I chose to do that I really enjoy doing it, (if that makes sense) thanks for the recognition though Jill

 

Rog

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I've had a specimen of Grifolia Frondosa from a small but old Beech wood close to J 23 of the M6 at Haydock.  Not as massive as the one pictured above though... and although it's edible.. I didn't fancy it due to the large numbers of dogs which get walk right past where I found it.

 

There's a fungus called Sparrassis Crispa.. known as the Cauliflower Fungus, which also grows at the base of trees.  I've only found it in Somerset.. but it too can get massive.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparassis

 

 

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Thing is though Lizzie that many of the best edibles don't look much like the white mushrooms you get in Tesco.  And some of those that look superficially like the ones you get in Tesco are deadly.

I can't repeat often enough that you really do need to know exactly what you've got before eating anything.

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On 10/2/2018 at 9:01 AM, plantfit said:

You only want the outside 1 to 1 1/2 inch,it gets very woody as you get closer to the center, not bad pan fried in oil and butter along with some trout and spring onions, bet to pickle the chicken of the woods though and use it later in the year, some people can be affected by it though,tingling feeling in the mouth or slightly swollen lips, never tried it myself beu know people who have, no taste at all on it's own, you have to add flavour as with most fungi hence the butter,onion,fish. plenty of recipes about in veggie books etc

 

Rog

 

I've tried Chicken of the Woods Rog.  Looks very different to the 'Hen of the Woods' pictured above.  Chicken of the Woods also grows differently, coming directly out of trees, usually oak and eventually forming large 'brackets'.  It generally appears midsummer onwards so is earlier than most others.  It starts as a bright yellow 'blob' which looks a bit like stuffing pushing out of a mattress.  At this stage it is edible but I find it a bit 'sharp' and astringent.  As it grows bigger it tends to form bracket shapes which have a fibrous texture quite like chicken  It's OK, but I much prefer Cepes, or some of the better Agarics, such as the Horse Mushroom, or  The Prince.

 

My fave of all are Chanterelles.. but I've only ever found them in Somerset.

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