Cliff Ton

The Day Brook (at Daybrook)

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There was another thread which got sidetracked onto this topic, but I reckon it deserves a heading of its own

Was/is there a 'Day Brook' running through DayBrook???

Still there, but well hidden and sometimes underground

With regard to the Daybrook..Early last century this pleasant looking mansion was on the site of the Five Ways pub, with a small lake in front fed by the brook.I forget who owned it,but I've got the info somewhere.

valehouse.jpg

Poohbear, The house was "Daybrook Vale" belonging to Charles J Mee, nurseryman.

The brook used to run through a tunnel near the Five Ways pub.

So to understand it all in one go, here's a map of the area back then.

brook.jpg

Daybrook Vale - the house pictured above - clearly has its own grounds and pond and boat house, and what seem to be gardens/nursery. And they seem to have connected the Day Brook to their fish pond.

For anyone who doesn't know....Bagthorpe Workhouse forms the basis of City Hospital

And finally, here's a photo which says its "Daybrook Vale", although I don't know exactly where. Looks like a nice place though; certainly won't find anywhere like that now

vale.jpg

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So where are you saying the house ( in the photo ) is on that map...cant be that square opposite the boathouse ( which seems to be the only place close to the lake ) as look at the size of it compared to the 'lodge'.

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I was guessing the location of the house in the photo was.....if you go straight up from the word "pond" you can see a driveway (dotted lines) pulling up outside the white shape which I took to be the house itself

Unless, of course, it's a completely different house altogether and I'm looking at the wrong place :)

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Looks good to me...the map even shows fir trees which appear in the picture near the house.This would put the Civil Defence 'town' smack in the middle of the house and lake area.Some of the original buildings might have been part of this.Although as a kid I just took it as being a load of ruined houses.There was certainly no water in the late fifties...just scrub.HM Civil Defence...Keep Out notices at the entrance on Ribblesdale Road....so of course we went in... :tongue:

The picture of the kids I would put as roughly part way up where Ribblesdale Road is now, looking west...the land does rise to the right up to Bedale Road from that location.

Edit....And the house and lake was still there in the twenties...I lived a few hundred yards to the north where Daybrook Vale Farm was.

fae23c12.jpg

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Re the "civil defence town" went in it once, my recollections are of a few house shells, saw at most maybe 8? and seem to recall like council houses? was told (by other kids) dated from WW2 LDV?HomeGuard type of thing? and used to have straw type dummies here and there?

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And another branch of Day Brook..........I found this http://www.pictureth...017816&prevUrl= on Picture the Past

I haven't yet worked out where the Brook is on that photo, but I'm intrigued by Farrand's Mill. Would that be connected to the Farrands with the grocers shops, who get a lot of mentions on these pages?

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There was a Farrand & Wyatt, Bleachers in Daybrook, maybe this was their mill? Regarding the Farrands grocers, there was a John Farrand, shopkeeper 49 Narrow Marsh, and Nathaniel Farrand, shopkeeper of 57 Narrow Marsh. Maybe they got together and formed the grocery shops we knew as kids.

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Farrands Mill and the Day Brook, Basford, Nottingham, c 1930s ? Site now occupied by Heathfield Estate, view is probably from where Valley Road is now.

??

More than likely a mill associated with the hosiery trade...there were dozens on the Leen before the coming of more modern engines.

I can't understand that they state the view is probably from the Valley Road area.Heathfields Estate is on a hill and by nature the brook would be in the valley...I would have thought the facts would have been the reverse.

Nice to see the brook was a decent sized stream and not the rubbish filled narrow ditch it is today

Anybody sussed where it joined the Leen?

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There is an article about the river leen and the Daybrook is mentioned as a tribuatary of the leen, it flows from Arnold and enters the leen near Vernon road.

I wonder if that is why there was some dye works and a large laundry in that part of old basford, built in order to use the supply of water, the daybrook must have been a lot wider than it is now and probably farrands mill was located there for the same reason.

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I've just been playing with Google Earth and I've found the tributary with the Leen

It passes under Vernon Road here

6498785549_e0f43a55c1_b.jpg

6498785649_602066060a_b.jpg

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And can be seen entering the Leen here

6498785883_eda470c6e8_b.jpg

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Behind the sandstone wall, that is pictured was a dye works, I think the sign is still up on one of the adjacent buildings. It only closed about 4 or 5 years ago.

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Here it was !!

6498958055_f5599301e8_b.jpg

6498975435_e477809613_b.jpg

6498975277_922eaff4e1_b.jpg

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Map from approx 1901, with a bit of highlighting by me

The big one is the Leen, and Day Brook is the one coming in from the right. Extend that a bit further and you are nearly at Valley Road

leen1.jpg

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All these posts over a little brook...but in our modern world we tend to forget how very important water sources were.Turning a tap on has made us all take things for granted.That little brook a few miles long sustained a lot of industry in the 1800s.And in earlier years must have been very important to all the farms on it's route.

I wonder in drought years how much all these small communities were affected by the lack of water...it must have been as disastrous as a failed crop of food.

I remember reading when the Lords of Colwick diverted and dammed the Trent to power their mills, and all those downstream finished up petitioning the King to restore the flow.It must have been a major disaster for those whose water source was restricted.

Makes you feel grateful for living in the present day even with all the hassle we have to put up with.

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It seems a bit strange when you compare the two pics (The first picture in my last post and Cliffs Map ) to see that at some point in time the River Leens course was altered near the tributary. Wonder why that was?

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I think the Leen over the centuries has had it's course altered more times than any other river in the district.Can't imagine that it once ran along the base of castle Rock.

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years gone by it only needed someone to have a good pee in it and The Leen flooded! theres a good few pics on picture the past of Lincoln Street Crossings and rest of the road flooded, plus Nottingham Road.. The area was a virtual ghost town before the powers that be did anything about it though in the 1970,s or 1980's?. Not just on that photo either, alot of The Leen from Bulwell to Basford (Wilkinson Street) has been ducted and diverted.

In Old Basford , for example Mill Street gives a clue! just above the petrol station on there can be found remains of an old mill, with a footpath along side,this goes all the way to Bulwell Market with The Leen either aside it , or the diverted route of such can be seen by the line of willow trees growing along it's former banks . Back at Mill Street the Leen ran just behind the garage, (still traceable) the former route on Cliff Tons map after it crossed the railway for the 2nd time was in "Bailey Bacon's Field" now an open area/park, and the old bridge under Nottingham Rd is still there

http://www.picturethepast.org.uk/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;NTGM006870&pos=1&action=zoom&id=58316

Picture shows Day Brook in Billy Bacon's Field having come under Vernon Rd and The Railway, The Leen is behind the photographer

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All these posts over a little brook...

Absolutely .... and I wonder how many people know it even exists, including those who live in the nearby area.

Until today I was only aware of the stretch along Valley Road and I'd never thought about where it comes from or goes to.

So today I've learned it connects with the Leen at Basford - but where does it end up in the opposite direction? Looking on maps I can only track it as far as it appears to go into the lake at Arnot Hill Park

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Yes indeed , a facinating little topic, I too never ever gave it a thought, even though I like to know the origins of place names, ( ings , tons, hams etc) For instance Arnold gets it's name from "Eagles corner" believe it or not !

I would imagine that it was probably land drainage from the hills into the lake at Arnot hill park and there after that forms it

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Forgot to mention that the corner of land in question re "Arnold" is probably the valley by the stream ,namely "Day Brook"

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The name Ernehale first appeared in the days of the Angles around 600AD and later appeared in the Doomsday Book.

In the Eagle pub in Arnold was a framed notice on the wall proudly showing the history of Arnold.It declared that the name Ernehale originally meant 'The place of the Eagles'...hence the name of the pub.

Being a keen ornithologist I was never happy with this knowing that the area of Arnold would never have been the habitat for eagles.Some areas of Derbyshire possibly.

The Golden and Sea eagles are cliff and mountain crag nesters,not in trees like eagles in some countries.Reading further I found that Erne could also mean Heron...meaning Erenhale would have meant 'Place of the heron' A much more sensible explanation for the name.

In early days the watershed from the surrounding hills (there are at least eight springs recorded) would have provided ideal marshy water meadows and ponds for Herons.

Several well known authors of Nottingham history came up with this explanation many years ago.

Below from History of Arnold...Rev.King and Rev.Russell...1913

THE DAY-BROOK.

This, the only important stream in Arnold, takes its rise in the North Howbeck fields, and drains the whole of the spring and rainwater from the southern watershed of the parish. Its widest part is at Daybrook bridge where it is about eight feet in width in winter, but less in summer.

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Looking at the original map again, I noticed another now-vanished big old house in the area.

Daybrook Vale (the house) and Daybrook Vale Farm have been mentioned, but on the right edge is Daybrook House - near the junction of what is now Thackerays Lane. Looking at Old Maps it seems to have disappeared sometime between 1919 and 1938. Never heard of it before, and Pic the Past don't have anything on it

house.jpg

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Daybrook house was only demolished a few years ago.For many years it was used for functions and weddings,I don't know who owned it in it's last years.It was not a very imposing building at the end...it looked more like a large white hotel.Although the name was well known in the area I don't recall ever knowing anyone who went to a 'do' there.It's now called Brookdale court...a small estate of modern houses.

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Can anyone tell what the "bridge" just before start of Daybrook Station sidings on the map in post 22, (also seen on later map with centre section missing in post 115 "Railway Photos" is all about? On both maps it does not seem to go anywhere in either direction? The supports to such were still there about 12 years ago, not sure if still there

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