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The Wells Road.  What's left of the  northern side of the Suburban Railway bridge, next to where the Gardeners Pub used to be.   https://maps.app.goo.gl/VqLHpvstQgzoBuVS7

Certainly is @philmayfield but now owned by Nottingham Trent University & will be used for degree ceremonies & music.   What is this? What was this? Bonus points if you nam

Entrance to the old Alms houses on London road.

Certainly is @philmayfield but now owned by Nottingham Trent University & will be used for degree ceremonies & music.

 

What is this?

What was this?

Bonus points if you name the high rise block in the distance 

 

EnDW2C5XMAI8rDt?format=jpg&name=small

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But what happened to those concrete warehouses, obviously demolished but why leave the basin?. I don't think it's been used since the barges stopped coming.

 

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I think they've built some expensive apartments there and kept the old dock as a 'water feature'. British  Waterways used to advertise themselves as 'From Humber Ports to the Midlands'. Goods were offloaded from ships in Hull direct into barges which came up the Trent. When we came to live in the Trent Valley back in 1962 there was still quite a lot of barge traffic on the river. They often used to moore up at Fiskerton overnight for a beer in the Bromley Arms.

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2 hours ago, philmayfield said:

They often used to moore up at Fiskerton overnight for a beer in the Bromley Arms.

I often used to fish from the sandy bank that used to be at the end of the flood wall upstream from the Bromley Arms. If the fishing was quiet we used to go for a beer at the pub at lunchtime but always left one person to mind the tackle and the keep nets in case one of John Harker's tanker barges came past as you had to move the baskets way up on the bank and hold all the keep nets and move in and out with the draught to stop them being washed away.

Strange what you remember but the Bromley Arms was a Kimberley Brewery pub and as I did not like their bitter, I drank the mild, the only mild I ever drank.

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14 hours ago, philmayfield said:

I think they've built some expensive apartments there and kept the old dock as a 'water feature'. 

 

One set of very expensive apartments have been there for a few years; another lot are in the process of being built at the moment.   https://goo.gl/maps/oiXc8bx6fkwGmjtGA

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You tempted me CT. The map shows the area of the 'Pleasure Park', bottom of Trent Lane. The place of many childhood happy memories for me. I am always searching for photographs of  the P/Park but no one seems to have any. Were we all that poor no one could afford a camera?

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I remember going to that place as well, although I was only young and didn't actually know where we were at the time. It's only later that I discovered it was Colwick.

 

There are several old threads on the subject, but unfortunately not many photos.   

 

https://nottstalgia.com/forums/search/?q=pleasure&updated_after=any&sortby=relevancy&search_in=titles

 

(and nice to see you're fit enough to still be posting ;))

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I remember the Colwick pleasure park as a child. I think we used to get there by boat from a stage on the Embankment just upstream of Trent Bridge. I also remember travelling on a much bigger boat, The Pride of the Yare, which I think went from the Embankment to Radcliffe and back. When we around 11 a friend and I used to hire a rowing boat and go up as far as Wilford Bridge. No life jackets, no parents. Couldn’t do that now!

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Phil, you really are ticking my memory switches. I remember going on the Pride of the Yare as a nipper. Often used to swim around where the row boats were, (could never afford to hire one though). Used to pile our clothes on the steps there and swim under Trent bridge. Once my pal ran up onto the bridge with intention of jumping/diving off. I was in the water below him when all of a sudden I stood up on a pile of bricks etc. so I was only ankle deep, Just where my pal was about to jump ! Fortunately I was able to shout and stop him. We could have only been about 12 or 13. Happy Days Eh.

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Phil. I remember my mum taking me on that river trip to Radcliffe.  I seem to remember getting off the boat there and walking up a little track to where there was a park?  After a while we came back on a train instead of the boat.  I can’t remember a lot of detail as I was only about 7 or 8

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Sorry about that Phil, that was due to me not reading Margies post properly. I shouldn't have interfered and minded me own business. Apologies to Margie as well for misinformation.

Just goes to prove.....I know bugger all.

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I've often wondered how deep the Trent is on average.  Around bridges it often looked very deep, but that may have been because it was so mucky. A lot of the rivers here are fairly clear so you can quickly get an idea of depth.

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When we had a boat in the 80’s and used to ‘cruise’ the Trent between Newark and Nottingham the depth was between six and nine feet. There was a deep stretch around Farndon where it was about thirty feet for about hundred yards. I think by then barge traffic in the main had ceased and they had stopped dredging. There was a fuel barge run by Whittaker’s than ran between Hull and Colwick for a time and more recently, but no longer, a gravel barge plied between Gunthorpe and Hull. Further downstream, on the tidal stretch, below Cromwell lock, there is still gravel barge traffic and seagoing boats from Europe dock at Gunness wharf not far up from the river Humber. I’ve never sailed on the tidal stretch but if you do you have to go with the high tide to avoid grounding on the sandbanks.

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