Dennis J M

Speak Nottinghameze

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A guzgog is a gooseberry. We used to say if you wanted a look, giz a gleg. Is that what you were thinking of?

Ha Ha. we said that too as kids in De Da land, Sheff. You Notters as I call you, I always thought talked posh compared to many places, take us love Ar kid, now whata mean, watter, babby,Nowt,,Wat thee on abart thar a gud en. Left handed, Dolly handed, the only place in the world that expression is used is Hillsborough. the darker side of the town, posibly comes from dolly mixtures at Bassets factory there. What great topic. love you people. best wishes. De Da Pete.

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I know what you mean RobL,when i came to West Mids i soon realized people dint know what i was saying,one of the things my hubby thought was funny was when i said to him, listen to the beds singing duck, and no one knew what babies pods were,sad to say i had to drop a lot of Notts Lingo,or Stand and explain worahweronabaaht.

Any way who would really think a Bed would sing about ducks. smile2

I had forgotten about babies pods!!

When we lived abroad I had to change so many words so that people knew what I was talking about, and what is really sad is my children wouldn't even know these now. We had bootees, not pods (they were for peas), rolls not cobs, ice lollies not suckers and probably loads more that I have forgotten. A lost culture noblue

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I have a couple here that Dad used to say. I am not sure how to spell the 'Nottinghameze' version, much easier to say than spell! :unsure:

Dyare.....Do you hear.

Giyova....Stop it.

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Dad used the term 'You Cheeky Arab' often.

Don't now the origins though.

TTFN

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Worrabaat ......................Gerounonit!

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If you want to sing along?

Ay up mi duck, ay y got a parnd
Gooin darn tarn, meet me at the Lion
Vodka through a straw, I'm already pissed up
I'll spray some shapes so the girls all act up
Gerrup, stand up, come on! Chuck your hands up
Saturday night n' Sunday morning
I'll be dancing all night, just heed my warning
I love that lippie, lets go down t' Chippy
Feel it, fry it, I'm feeling drunk
I'll tek y' rarnd back, don't drop y' chips
Is it cowd? Y' got chapel at pegs!
I'll meet y' t'morra artside Greggs

I'm off darn tarn x 2
Lend us a parnd and jump around
Jump ararnd x 3
Jump up, jump up and get darn.
Jump [18x]

Gerrit up, Gerrit in, I can't wait to begin
Gi us that tin, ay you put out the bin
Y' lookin rough, you've had enough
boffed y' kebab on Brian Clough
Am gooin darn t' Lion in 't Market Square
I reckon there's a few lasses gooin spare
Mi cars all knackered, I can't mek it goo backard
I need to gerrit arrt, let's gi-it a clarht
Yo, I could do wi a pie, then I'll tek the twat om
See her, fat lass, keys are in the flat
Who worri wi, worree wi 'er ?
No it wer that lass from darn Goose Fair

Chorus

Nottingham's da place to be
For every lad, there's lasses three
Robbing the rich to feed the poor
Robin Hood he knew the score
Don't believe owt abhart guns n' thugs
I've got more rhymes than little Jake Bugg
Lend us a parnd or gi us a twenteh
It's a bloody Shane Meadows' documenter-eh

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Brilliant ! Thanks for posting .

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What about the old wartime 'starved of treats', 'gis yer coggin when yo've done wi'it.'

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Or even arf unnit

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Seriously, has anybody given any thought about making a series of recordings of old Nottingham language. Because when the likes of us are gone, so will be gone the language we speak. Children today all speak 'estuary English' with it's glottal stops (eg bo'ul for bottle). There's easily enough source material on these pages. The weather report in Nottinghamese was just a joke to them, and the girl didn't pronounce half the words correctly.

(edited for spelling)

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Bing, re #75, there was a BBC local radio project in 1999 called The Century Speaks where the local stations around the country, including Radio Nottingham, recorded the memories of local people talking in their own regional dialect and these were to be stored in the National Sound Archive of the British Library to form a Millenium Memory Bank, though how this is now accessed I have no idea.

The interviews were also published in book form Voices of Nottinghamshire although in this you have to be able to speak Nottinghameze to fully appreciate it!

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Born and bred in Old Radford I certainly can speak nottnm. I bet our house here in north-east Thailand is the only one for many miles around that mashes a cup of tea. And my Thai wife and kids understand "av yer mashed miduck?"

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Not heard that for years! Keep a lookout :)

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Keeping conk was a regular term in Radford/Hyson Green for keeping a look out. Usually it was keeping conk for park keepers, coppers on the beat, teachers, spirit tapping or for another street nicking your bonfire rubbish.

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A directive well known in Comyn Street and surrounds, and if memory serves me correctly, which it don't allus nowadays, was also heard in the pastoral gentility of Ruddington in the mid 50's!

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'Keeping conk' was a saying we'd use as kids in the Meadows. Like mick2me wrote, it was keeping a lookout when we were up to something we shouldn't have been.

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Someone used to keep conk for the teacher at Trent Bridge Seniors. Unfortunately Mr Marciniak snuck in by a different corridor so evading the lookout & caught me in the act of drawing a male appendage on the blackboard, of course I suffered pain for it..

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"And I kept conk" crops up in quite a few court cases in the Evening Post , earliest I could see was 1919 and then are there mentions up to 1949 .

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