Dennis J M

Speak Nottinghameze

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I think my ex-wife would have liked one, she always said I was a spanner and that my attitude needed adjusting!

Was your ex nuts or crackers BM hellothere

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Hi All,

 

My late mother had an expression "standing around like Joss", by which I think she meant being kept waiting if I was dawdling. Has anyone else come across this or similar? I've looked up "joss" on Google (there are no hits on this site) and it seems to refer to good luck or a lucky charm or figure, especially in China.  Why do I want to know? I'm trying to choose a name for a new puppy and Joss came up on a search of dog names. My wife and I rather like it, especially the "good luck" meaning - but how being kept hanging about relates to good luck beats me, though!

 

Ta for reading this,

 

MB

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Joss sticks?  Does the dog smell nice?  Our dog when I was little used to like rolling in anything unsavoury or dead - I think he saw it as a mark of respect or something.  One day at Chapel St Leonard's, he rolled in a dead seagull on the beach and we had to hold him under the outside tap on the caravan site to try and wash the smell away...... unsuccessfully, as we didn't think to use any soap or shampoo.  

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Joss Ackland, the actor, is also called Jocelyn among other first names.

 

I've found another reference to Joss being good luck in a short story in "Sea Warfare", by Rudyard Kipling, called "Concerning Joss" in which he talks about the value of good luck in wartime, in his story the war at sea in WW1.

 

And Joss also may refer to The Boss or foreman, so "standing around like Joss" may refer to a boss who doesn't do much?

 

Smelly dogs! Our last dog, a very furry Beardie, liked deer poo, urrgh!

 

MB

 

 

 

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Manversboy #1

From visits to China,  Joss is a Chinese religious statue or a house idol so I can see where the expression comes from.

Incidentally a Joss Stick is a stick coated with something fragrant and burned before a Joss

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Oztalgian,

 

Thanks for that, I can see the connection too now, but odd how it came to be a piece of British slang unless Chinese idols were common souvenirs?

 

Ta

 

MB

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Since I do not understand this site or how to use it, I will put this here and hope someone can send it where it needs to be!

                     A LESSON IN LINGO!

 

If your dad said he’ll ‘box yer tabs’, would yo’ know woree meant?

Tabs is ‘ears’, box is ‘hit’ so it’s a painful punishment

Its for sure you’ve all bought ‘duddoo’s’ wi’ a bronze threp’ny bit,

They’re sweeties from a ‘tuffee’ shop; does that make sense of it?

No need to mourn when ‘Charlie’s dead’ and nobody shed’s a tear

It’s telling you your slip is showing, now that should make it clear.

Don’t frahn at ‘ayya-bin-dahn’ it asks ‘Have you been to the match?’

And a small round loaf with a crusty top is colloquially called a ‘batch’

Now, ‘ayya-gorra-wi-ya’ shouldn’t cause you strife.

It simply and politely asks, ‘Are you with your wife’?

If asked ‘Can I ey ya coggin?’ and with that you cannot grapple,

They’re only begging for what remains of your half eaten apple!

To the use of that word ‘nunnoo’s’, let’s get you reconciled,

It’s simply the gift of pennies that one gives to a child.

Ask for a ‘cob’ and I promise you you’ll not be given a horse,

Round these parts, it simply means a small bread roll of course!

Now, heard from the lips of a woman, ‘Ooh she’s a ‘stuck up cah!’

She’s not a cow in a field of glue; she speaks kinda ‘lah di dah’!                                             

When in a pub and someone asks ‘oyya-beeya-sen?’

He’s simply curious as to why you’re on your own again.

A knock on the door, you open it, a friend stands there-upon,

And asks ‘Oyya ya mashin’?’ don’t be alarmed, just put the kettle on!

And a ‘clubman’ isn’t someone suffering crippling of the feet

It’s a man who sells stuff at the door and you pay him weak by week.

Now ‘teggies’ are children’s teeth and ‘dannies’ their tiny hands

In a muddle over ‘laggies’? They’re simply elastic bands.

I didn’t write this ditty to imply that you are dumb

It’s to help you understand how we talk in Nottingum!

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On 27/04/2017 at 6:10 PM, colwickite said:

 and ‘dannies’ their tiny hands

 

I've never heard that one either.   I'd agree with 'Dandies'.

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Nope, me mam always said dannies when I were little

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Many years ago I worked on the Trent Polytechnic building as an electrician and at lunchtime two or three or four of us used to go for a pint in the Dophin on North Church Street. One day one of the lads who lived in the Meadows told us it was his wife's birthday so we asked him what he had bought her, "An om pom" he said. A what? "an om pom" he said, what's an om pom? We asked. You know, he said, one of them kits a woman uses to do 'er own 'air. The rest us fell about laughing when we realised he mean a "Home perm".

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shudda leritt cooloff then

 

Rog

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Just listening to Notts TV and the Nottingham author Joy James was being interviewed about the "Nottingham accent" she says that our accent is really "ugly" and that women or ladies of Nottingham try to round the accent off so as not to sound too "ugly" Has this woman gone barmy,has she took leave of her senses how very dare she, ugly accent indeed

 

Rog

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What about the "Birmingham" accent?

How can three million people have a speech impediment ?

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I meant to post this ages ago in this topic. There is an excellent little book by Richard Scollins ( i knew him slightly) called Ey up mi duck.

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Hubby rarely uses words or phrases from Nottingham he's been here 40 years plus, duck slips out occasionally but the one that causes the most laughter is  going to "are arase" not sure about the spelling.

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Good book Brew I often look at my copy and smile at some of the stuff in it, although we say these things every day it looks completely different when it's written down

 

Rog

 

 

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