Speak Nottinghameze


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If you want to sing along? Ay up mi duck, ay y got a parnd Gooin darn tarn, meet me at the Lion Vodka through a straw, I'm already pissed up I'll spray some shapes so the girls all act up Gerrup, sta

On 30 May 2018 at 8:55 PM, IAN123. said:

Best one i ever heard was in the Two 

Beavers Cafe on Alfreton Rd.

Young girl came in looking for a soft drink.

"Gorranypoporowt"?

 

I recon Two Beavers cafe was run by Mrs Barry St Ives.

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My dad said that, he was in Burma and India during the war, wonder if it was one of the words he brought back with him, like coggage for newspaper, decko for look etc. 

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According to dad it's an Arabic word he heard whilst serving in Egypt although I bet no Arab ever pronounced it the way we do.

 

Following Jonabs post - why do we run all the words together when writing Nottinghamese?

 

As in:   Entenyonyergorrenyonyer?   It's easier if we write Ent eny on yer gorr eny on yer   and it makes sense...…..?

 

Just a thought..

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Re SNAFU and FOOBAR (that should read FUBAR). I thought they were British army acronyms. As a kid, I remember a cousin (big-wig in the army) using them liberally and me getting a clip round the ear when I asked what they meant. There were others but they weren't so popular and I've forgotten them.

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"Situation Normal All Fouled Up", I remember but Foobar (Fubar) escapes me. "NAAFI" is one that could apply to quite a few individuals, particularly at the end of a phone line!

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FUBAR IS F*****d up beyond all reason.

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Thanks Fly, I had worked out the FU bit, but? incidentally my daughter was up home last weekend from the IoW so Monday AM had a walk 'dahn town', thro' Vicky center ,nowt like that on the island, (yet!) then thro' slab square to have a look at that warehouse that Mellors bloke's had built  then across to the "Malt Cross" but went into what we thought was their 'gift shop' next door (Nokky's?) Wow Nottinghamese as it is spoken but printed on every thing from fridge magnets to sweat shirts. My daughter's laughter nearly got us chucked out so on into the "Malt Cross", had a quick look at a nice selection of cask ales but settled for a nice big slice of 'Date & Walnut' cake & a coffee for just 4 quid, can recommend a visit to any one dahn town!  

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On 3/29/2012 at 12:58 AM, Trevor S said:

Found this on the Tears of a Clown site and thought it would be of interest.

There are some interpretations that are hilarious, some I have not heard of and I seem to remember that 'let's have a guzgog' was 'let's have a look?'

 

A Guide to Nottingham English

For those not necessarily of a Nottingham persuasion, here’s a fail-safe guide to survival to help you through a stay in the Lace City. It’s not comprehensive or fool-proof and please note that important tasks such as ordering a pint etc. can be performed quite adequately by pointing, talking loudly and s-l-o-w-l-y. With help from local language expert John Beeton, here’s a selection of Nottinghamshire sayings and phrases that may help when visiting the city:

Prattinn abaht. Acting stupidly.

Ee-addizzedd dahn the bog. He had been sick.

Bogga that furr gaima soajiz. I shall not continue with this course of action.

korl yersenn a faiter? I do not share your confidence in your abilities as a pugilist.

Eez tookizz battomm.He is sulking.

Annair doo. A hairstyle.

Gerrupp them stairs. It is time for bed.

Ee doant gerronn wee nobbdi. He is unsociable.

Nehmind ay. Don’t let it concern you.

Batt yersenn dahn. Dust yourself off.

Av podged missenn. I have had sufficient to eat.

Wairvyerbinn till nah? Did you get lost?

Yo-a prattannarf yo-are. You are a fool.

Faktreh. Industrial workplace.

Eezabitt finnikeh. He is rather choosy about his food.

Up the spaht. Pregnant.

Wottyo prattin abaht wee? What are you doing?

Yent, aya? I don’t believe you have done that.

Gerrineer. Please come in.

Adunno worritts all abaht. It is a complete mystery to me.

Oajer noise. Please be quiet.

Ahtahse. Garden shed.

Av ott missen. I am in considerable pain.

yor gerrin woas yo ahr – your getting worse you are

Skehf = dandruff

twitchel, or jitty (more common in Eastwood in my time than ‘jennel’) tundish = funnel

Eastwood: Brown Town

Cotch:To Sit Down and Relax

Mardy = somewhat disagreeable

im gerrin ona bus ngooin dahn tahn-I’m going to take the bus to the town centre

giz a guzgog could i have a gooseberry

GERRONTKAWSIE – WALK ON THE PAVEMENT

bobbo – horse

Enny rowd up: Which ever way you look at it.

Causie – pavement,

Entry or ginnal – pathway,

mucker – friend,

smigin – small amount,

wagon – lorry

Awerre! – I believe your are lying to me

Chatty: In a mess

Cummoninnoutonnit! = take heed of the inclement weather children !

eesraytstuckup He is a little reserved/not friendly.

yadenni tea-ye? Have you eaten dinner yet?

oowarraweethen? – Who was I with then?

I’ll seeyu safto I’ll see you this afternoon

gerumrappedupduk i’ll take them with me ,miss

Yerrwot? :What was that last phrase you uttered?

shut yagobb be quiet

Oldyerorses Stop right there

  A Guzgog is a local dialect for Gooseberry. Just thought I'd throw that in. B.

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I thought it was 'ghee uz a gleg' or 'giz a gleg' rather than 'giv us a gleg'

 

Also, a point about an origin. 'Let's ah a butchers' I thought was cockney rhyming slang - 'butchers'  as in 'butchers hook' = look

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Beware the Derby "Duck" thieves. On a coach trip through Europe recently a small group of Derby folk were telling the rest of us Nottingham folk that "ayup me duck" was a Derbyshire saying. Even in hotels and restaurants they were trying to get the waiters to say "ayup me duck" and telling them it was  Derbyshire lingo.

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Reading this brought a big smile to my face. Absolutely brilliant ! We have friends from France who speak perfect and I mean perfect English, but when I (especially after a few drinkpoos) drop into Nottinghamese, they do not understand a word and have to ask the other half to translate.

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On 2/18/2019 at 9:00 AM, Gemcorma said:

Beware the Derby "Duck" thieves. On a coach trip through Europe recently a small group of Derby folk were telling the rest of us Nottingham folk that "ayup me duck" was a Derbyshire saying. Even in hotels and restaurants they were trying to get the waiters to say "ayup me duck" and telling them it was  Derbyshire lingo.

 

In Nottm and its environs. 'Miduck' seems prevalent.  On a trip to Wirksworth in Derbys. a few years ago I noticed that it was just 'Duck', without the 'Mi'.

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On 2/18/2019 at 10:00 AM, Gemcorma said:

Beware the Derby "Duck" thieves. On a coach trip through Europe recently a small group of Derby folk were telling the rest of us Nottingham folk that "ayup me duck" was a Derbyshire saying. Even in hotels and restaurants they were trying to get the waiters to say "ayup me duck" and telling them it was  Derbyshire lingo.

 

I've got a little paperback book called ey up me duck.  Great fun trying to get friends to read it!   That said has anyone read Roddy Doyle's Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, brilliantly funny but after the first couple of pages I realised that I had to read it in an irish accent - if that makes any sense at all - did help that at the time I had an Irish boss so got used to 'dirty trees' = 33, vagels hard = vehicles hired,  a giraffe = a draft and so on..............

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