Compo

Any accent experts out there?

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i think we as had plastic pacamaks in the 50s for trips out and jelly shoes i hated them made my feet hurt . but because they were cheap i had to wear them or plimsols in the summer holidays. but at least i always got good shoes to go back to school and a new coat ready for winter months.

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Cranson had an old ambulance as "tour bus" for the band, one summer sunday went with him in it to Wollaton Park, chatted up 2 mod girls with intention of putting the settee's in the back to use but they kept going on about how fast scooters were, honestly believed they were faster than bikes, Mick wanted to give one a pillion ride but in the end I think we dumped them somewhere!

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If the mod chicks thought scooters were fast, a pillion ride on the back of Cranson's Vincent Black Shadow would have been an experience for them.

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Remember those anoraks well. All the rage at the British School in Arnold in 1966 the year I was there. Always felt the blue ones were intrinsically cooler than the brown ones which were unfortunately chosen by some mate's mums.

I also remember in the same era 'pak-a-maks' (sp). What a bind they were (and sore on the legs when you were wearing short trousers). Thank the lord for 'Batman' cards with bubbly gum and 'Milko' chews to take your mind off the pain...

Pacamacs & Batman, i'd wear my pacamac like a t batcape.........................hood up. top button done up, rest of mac acted like a cape............when you ran it billowed out behind you..................

Got some funny looks with that one!! ..............I suppose it was cos' I was in my early 30's, & pushing a pram,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, :blush:

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Yes that was the idea, me and Issy once had an interesting lift home from your place via him,think in a jag? scared the life out of her!

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when my mate chris was going out with crason had many a ride home in that old amulance and the transit they had after it but carnt for the life of me remember if it was blue or red transit and i can never remember the other gutarists name anyone else remember.

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no ash she came from netherfield and still lives there

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#32 and #33. Just caught up with this thread. The rising intonation at the end of an Australian's remark is described as aquizzical. Regarding the way heducated people speak in pronouncing flat vowels, such as barth and parth for bath and path, it makes me smile when they get caught out and cannot lengthen the vowel without it sounding ridiculous. Such a word would be 'black'. They could not say blarck, so they say 'bleck'.

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There used to be a programme on telly called "Ask Aspel" (Michael aspel was the host). It was always referred to as ARSK ASPEL. Now, if you are going to say ARSK then surely you should also say ARSPEL so why was it not "Arsk Arspel"? Posh buggers should stick to a formula and not change it at will :)

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In the late 60s I worked in Clacton and was seeing a girl named Sandra, her Dad of course called her Sarndra, it did irritate me.

The Dad and myself got on ok til I started calling him Terd. End of romance.

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My wife gets irritated when someone calls Missouri "Missoura" I said your Sister say's it that way...."Oh no she doesn't" she said...I sniggered when her Sister dropped by on the way back to St Louis and said something with "Missoura" in it....

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Here in OZ the academics are saying we are losing a lot of our Aussie slang like cobber,bonzer fair dinkum.ridge a didge and moving more towards Americanisms like awesome (which I hate).I also hate easy peasey or to easy mate,I always reply nothing is to easy MATE!!!!!

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A LESSON IN LINGO!

If your dad says he’ll ‘box yer tabs’, would you know what he meant?

Tabs are ‘ears’, box is ‘hit’ and it’s a painful punishment

And I’ll bet you’ve all bought ‘duddoo’s’ with a bronze threepenny bit,

They’re sweeties from a ‘tuffee’ shop; does that make sense of it?

No need to mourn when ‘Charlie’s dead’ and nobody sheds a tear

It’s telling you your slip is showing, that’s that cleared up my dear.

Don’t frown at ‘ayya-bin-dahn’ it asks if you’ve been to the match?

And a small round loaf with a crusty top is always called a ‘batch’

And ‘ayya-gorra-wi-ya’ should never cause you strife.

It simply and politely asks, ‘Are you with your wife’?

If asked ‘Can I eyya coggin?’ and with that you cannot grapple,

Somebody wants what remains of your half eaten apple!

To the use of that word ‘nunnoo’s’, let’s get you reconciled,

It’s simply the gift of pennies that one gives to a child.

Ask for a ‘cob’ and I promise you you’ll never be given a horse,

Round these parts, it simply means a small bread roll of course!

Now, heard from the lips of a woman, ‘Ooh she’s a ‘stuck up cah!’

She’s not a cow in a field of glue, she speaks with a ‘lah dih dah’!

When in a pub and someone asks ‘oyya-beeya-sen?’

He’s simply curious as to why you’re on your own again.

A knock on the door, you open it, a friend stands there-upon,

And asks ‘oyya ya mashin’?’ don’t be scared, just put the kettle on!

And a ‘clubman’ isn’t someone suffering crippling of the feet

It’s a man who sells stuff on the knock and you paid him weak by week.

Now ‘teggies’ are children’s teeth and ‘dannies’ their tiny hands

In a muddle over ‘laggies’? They’re simply elastic bands.

Now I didn’t write this ditty to imply that you are dumb

It’s to help you understand how we talk in Nottingum!

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Bazza, I never heard the term "cobber" on the mainland, just in Tassie.

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Joy, our tabs weren't boxed, they were batted!

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Yes - I had a 'batted tab' a few times!

Just to confirm that and apple core is a coggin. Most people pronounce our family name as Coggin although it is spelt Coging and pronounced Coe-ging. I was nicknamed Apple at school, as in apple coggin.

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Compo, I worked at Annesley and Newstead pits and all those from ovvert brook used the O for a third person, they all came from Ayswood, Ilson Hayna and Often. Couldnt beleive how much the accent changed not so many miles away. I was bi lingual after a year dahnt pit.

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Arh, may anorl serry.

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Not heard the word 'serry' for decades.

When a few of us formed the Hucknall RC in about 1958 I had a job understanding some of the Ukers lingo. It was all thees, thahs, yoth and so on. Onleh 2 miles up frum Bulwul and so diffrunt.

I found Bulwell and Radford very similar though.

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Years ago at school, a teacher talked of preserving fine old regional dialects etc. I asked if Notts was included and it wasn't. I think my wonderful mother in law gave the answer as to why not. I once remarked to her about having a regional accent myself. She said no, I didn't. I was badly spoken. I often wished I'd never spoken to her again after that!

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When at senior school in the city our new music teacher, fromo outside the Midlands) said that he found the local dialect very strange and went through a number of "Local" dialect words, most of which were strange to us. We wondered what the hell he was on about when, after some weeks, one of us finally realised that he was living in Annesley and he was thinking that Annesley was the Nottingham dialect.

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