Early Closing - Does it still exist?


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My one and only reason to visit "Moorgreen Show" still with my parents in my late teens!.................and as you say .Yuk!

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The Pretty Windows had a license to serve early morning. Had wormates that would go there after a night shift end at 6am. Not my cup of tea!

Remember the lock-ins too? The Hand Inn, The Old Dog and Partridge and many others.

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I recall having a 'Dog & Partridge Pub Crawl' night, as a regular event among the Laggers in Nottingham mid/late 60's, we'd start one side of parliament street & keep crossing to & fro to both D&P's, till we could move no more, last man standing won............................a pint from everyone in the game!! Regular protagonists were Pete Storey, Dave Teece, Pat & Danny Gallagher , Pete & Joe Ryan & me....................

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paulus isthat pete storey from clifton by any chance know this pete storey very well saw him saturday at earawash museum. know him from our bikng days and from when he worked at bell fruit with piggy still rides a nortonamong others he has got he retired last year

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I remember Wednesday half day at Clifton when I were a lad, used to walk from top of Farnborough road to Gotham (who's half day was Thursday) to buy sweets, by the time we got back to Clifton the papershop at the top of Farnborough road was open for the evening papers,still, passed time on during school holidays during those long warm summers

Rog

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its funny this should come up, i was only talking to some workmates about how Sunday afternoons was a strange empty time, compared with now.

where i lived in basford near the standard of england pub which had a shop next door (now a hairdressers) when he closed at 1pm on sunday that was it. of course the pubs were open til 2.30 but at this time i was at primary school and not much of a boozer!

however there was a petrol station at the top of kersall drive that stayed open all day, and one day we noticed he had a small selection of sweets and crisps that we would buy for the sheer novelty of buying stuff at 3.00pm an sunday afternoon.

can't help but wonder what the staff thought of a fairly steady stream of kids coming in over that year, because this went all around my school and was not believed by a lot of my mates at first.

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name='piggy and babs' timestamp='1337386982' post='126004']

paulus isthat pete storey from clifton by any chance know this pete storey very well saw him saturday at earawash museum. know him from our bikng days and from when he worked at bell fruit with piggy still rides a nortonamong others he has got he retired last year

[/u]

No Babs, different bloke.............this Pete S. now lives in Grantham, & was a Lagger by trade

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There was a shop down Station Road near the Penticostal Church in Carlton, called "Buntys" She was open on a Sunday afternoon , and it was great walking down there for 4 pennorth of sommat !!

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i used to go into buntys every dayon my way to school and i am sure kat would have gone in there too as it was only two mims from our school next to old regal cinemanow part of the pentcostal church, bunty had twin sons stephen and peter . pete was a biker and steve a mod

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The trains were also good if a train had a buffet car on and on it's way alcohol could be served whatever the time.

Great Central at Loughborough used to capitalise on this in its earlier days. They had a buffet car which stocked draught beer, both keg and real ale, and we had a regular hard-core of people who used to buy a yearly membership in order to sit and drink on a Saturday afternoon. Mostly older men, respectable types; there were a couple who could occasionally be a nuisance but whilst steady drinking was tolerated drunkenness wasn't and anyone who started to go for it was gently reeled in by the others. Once licensing hours were relaxed, they didn't come back, but the revenue was handy while it lasted.

Further to the 11.00 closing; I lived in Eastwood for a couple of years, 1984-86, and the licensing laws in Notts and Derbyshire differed; Nottinghamshire was 10.30 and Derbyshire 11.00 on Fridays and Saturdays. We used to scoot out of the Sun or the King Billy in Eastwood at about twenty to eleven to get a couple in at the Station in Langley Mill before the bell went down there... I often wonder if it was worth the bother!

Pretty Windows licence was because of Sneinton market of course; there was a pub in Newark, can't remember which one, which enjoyed the same benefits. I think most market towns had one. There was also a decent cafe in Sneinton market, run, ISTR, by a chap who was reputed to have rather "different" sexual orientation to the majority of the traders!

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There is/was a expression here in Loughborough of "A moo cow Monday" when someone threw a sicky on that day.

The Golden Fleece near the "Cattle Market" had a early licence on that day.

There are now no pubs in Loughborough with an early opening. :(;)

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in the mid 80's we would scoot up to the colliers arms, if we were boozing around nuthall road which was outside the old babbington pit, due to it being about 200 feet outside the city boundary it stayed open til 11

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thursday used to be early closing day for many of the shops in the city - and certainly lasted well into the 1960s. And Jessops department store - like all the John Lewis stores at that time - closed all day on Mondays so that its staff could have a full Sunday/Monday 2 day weekend. That practice lasted to the late 198-s or early 1990s.

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  • 5 years later...

Another topic resurrection:

'Ucknall's half-day closing was Wednesday. Some inspired genius thought that Ucknall could emulate Sheffield and form a football team made up of shopworkers and call it  "Hucknall Wednesday". I think there were about two volunteers. Most of the shop workers were well past their footballing days at that time. It didn't progress. This was in the early '60's.

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When I started at Sturtons plumbers in 72 we were still expected to work a 45 hour week which included Saturday morning 8am till 1pm. That changed whilst I was still there to a 40 week Saturday mornings then became non-compulsory overtime at time and a half. Also the pay rate increased quite quickly over the next few years.

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  • 3 years later...

As well as early closing during the week, I also remember the time when nothing opened on Sunday.

 

The best you got was the newsagents opening for a few hours on Sunday morning; then that was it.

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