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HSR

9d in 1819 modern daily value..

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Got my self a laptop.Looking though some records..interested if somebody could give me a figure on above...I am thinking  about £3.40 a day..a pittance after 15 years service 1804-19 but actually more than I expected.

 

Would be intrested if anybody has any links or info on Chelsea pensioners in general during the Napoleonic wars..

 

Eg..did only the soldiers who received an injury qualify? Seems likely as they are referred to as 'out patients'.

 

When I looked into this about 3 years ago I found very little information.

 

 

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About £2.15.

 

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/currency-converter/#currency-result

 

Don’t know about Chelsea pensioners, but when my ancestor left the army, having gone all the way through the Peninsular War, he got about fifteen shillings to bring him, his wife, and their son, back from Ireland where the 45th Regiment was based in 1820.

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Fascinating stuff Rob.L..was your ancestor a Nottingham man?

Mine was Irish..came with Inniskilling Dragoons and settled in Nottingham about 1830.

I'm all Nott's until Mum & Dad moved in the early 1970's!

 

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Soldiers could qualify for a pension either due to injury/illness attributable to their service or for length of service.  Out pensioners were those who stayed "at home" and in pensioners were those who lived at Chelsea

 

Records may survive for your man, but lots haven't.  If you don't already have his records, what was his name?

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HSR,

 

My ancestor was born in York in 1789, but enlisted firstly in the Nottingham Militia and then the 45th Regiment of Foot (Sherwood Foresters). His military records show that he was involved in twelve battles across Spain/Portugal/France, and his “General Service” medal, which was awarded in the 1840s to soldiers who served in the Napoleonic wars and were still alive, is in the Sherwood Foresters museum in Nottingham Castle.

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Ann, yes 'out' pensioners I now recall as being the more common term, thanks for the confirmation that uninjured soldiers also received a pension.

 

Regarging my ancestor I have researched down to 24 or possibly 72 men. Other than reading his Officers diary he will sadly remain an 'other rank'.

 

Rob.L 

Good to know that your family's heritage is is in the appropriate place. Can never understand these programmes like flog it..

Claim .. got nobody to pass it on to.? Personally I would be buried with it!

 

Rob.L and Annswabey

I have a few questions relating to the Nott's & Derbys  (Foresters)..

 

In general..the  family tree..

I consider i have  been quite successful with the 200 year old stuff..

 

But when it comes to Nott's & Derbys I'm drawing pretty much a blank.....talking 1880 to pre WW1.. I have snippets..

If anybody can recommend I book..I will gladly buy it.

 

 

 

 

 

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HSR. Not sure what you mean by "researched down to 24 or possibly 72 men"   Don't you know his name?

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Ann..Spent three hours looking into this earlier this evening.. achieved nothing but a headache!

My ancestor was a gunner..thus I made the assumption 6 guns 4 men equals 24, there were 10 companies in total only three served in his Theatre(72)(probably wrong). Have his discharge papers and this all appears to fit..feel a total ignoramus however when it comes to infrastructure, facts & figures.

 

 

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