All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. I'll strongly resist the temptation to become embroiled in political conflict, but it was the Clean Air Act which sounded the death knell for the North Notts collieries and mining communities. Housing was going over to gas and electric, the railway was going diesel and electric, so the demise was inevitable. Power stations were moving to gas and nuclear. Margaret Thatcher just completed the long drawn out conclusion sad as it was.
  3. FLY2

    Nottinghams Heritage Assets

    Rog, I'm afraid you've got the wrong end of the stick, regarding the types of people lolling around on the Council House steps. Begging and alcohol consumption are banned in the city centre I think, and anyway, I've not seen the wretched souls you mention. The ones I was referring to are generally just scruffy groups of teens and twenties who make the entrance look untidy. There's plenty of places to sit around the square.
  4. A Good Run of Bad Luck..... Clint Black
  5. FLY2

    Keep One Drop One

    Lunch Break
  6. Today
  7. jonab

    The Lost City.

    Imagine what Elf & Safety would have to say about machinery powered by belts (or ropes) and shafting like that of Coates. It should be remembered that shafting was the normal method of powering all kinds of static machinery before electric motors came on the scene. Lots of the shafts were at ground level so you had to be very careful where you placed your feet when moving around - this machinery was very powerful and didn't stop for things as trivial as a foot or a leg in the way. This was in addition to the tabletop level of the subsidiary shafts driving individual machines (knitting machines, looms etc). These were very good at crushing fingers and hands. This is not some Victorian workhouse system. I can easily remember whole factories being powered like this.
  8. carni

    Nottinghams Heritage Assets

    Both of my Children now 50ish, have a love of Nottm, passed on to them from me. It comes from their visits home to see my family when they were younger. Sadly most have passed away now so we don't travel home as much these days. We live 25mins train ride from Bham but I can't take to the place at all, another city that has lost some fabulous architecture. Our son and his partner really love Nottm and have a couple of city breaks there a year, not long back from one. They stay at the IBIS on Fletcher gate and come rain or shine have at least two visits to Wollaton Hall, lasting 3/4 hours a time. They were at Nottm on Goose fair week but didn't realise at the time. When they found out it opened on the Wednesday, they walked up Mansfield Rd in the evening and had over two hours walking round. They loved the atmosphere and sampled all the treats of the fair(being foodies like Momma). It finished their break off with a great tradition thrown in as well. They don't remember the Nottm that I knew, but they certainly love the city as they know it, and I am very proud to be a Nottm Gel, and after all these years I have never lost my accent, and no intention of losing it now. Mi ducks. PS Just remembered. The university is top of the list for Gdaughter as we have taken her to four now and Nottm specialises in Maths, which is her best subject.
  9. philmayfield

    Time Lord!

    We don't watch Dr. Who - never have. It was there when I switched on so I changed channel quickly!
  10. JamesS

    Kinglake Street

    Does anyone remember a family on Kinglake street called Prophet?
  11. Commo

    The Lost City.

    Aaaah, from the time when men knew how to surprise a gal, and when women appreciated such wonderful gifts. Well done George!!
  12. jonab

    All Kinds of Everything.

    My mother used to think the same about secondhand books. She imagined that they all came from houses and hospitals laced with infectious diseases and just opening one would release all sorts of 'germs'. A bookshop that particularly caught her notice was a small place near the top of Drury Hill, on the left going down - it was painted red and had books outside on small trestles. She would cross the road to avoid going near the place but, Drury Hill being so narrow, that wasn't very far. She was an avid reader and user of Hucknall town library and the "Little Red Library" so, I did try to point out that library books had been in other people's houses but according to her, they were 'clean houses'. I really don't know why I remember these snippets. It's odd what NS can do to one's memory.
  13. mary1947

    Nottinghams Heritage Assets

    Don't get me wrong I love my City. I have lived in quite a few places Arnold, Daybrook, South Africa, Anderby, Eastwood, now Jacsdale. When people ask were am I from I will always say Nottingham I always class myself as a Nottingham girl no matter where I go. Then I will always say "Yes I'm a Nottingham girl and proud to be, as you see and I'm a St Ann's girl. this is where my root's are, the old St Ann's. Buildings The University this is one of the best buildings we have old! yes! but still in good condition we have Jesses Boot to thank for giving the Uni for our city.
  14. IAN123.

    The Lost City.

    Nowt like a double drainer!
  15. IAN123.

    The Lost City.

    Coates..a Dunkirk firm with a great history.
  16. IAN123.

    The Lost City.

    Three more advertisements from Nottm's past.Moulton Major..were'nt rhat bad.
  17. Yesterday
  18. Shame it's changed Oz..Thatcher the life Snatcher.
  19. A Mansfield Poem By Alan Curtis When I visit my old home town, It’s a trip down memory lane. My mind goes back to my childhood days. And I am a young boy again. There were many quarries around the town, And many Coal mines too, There were cotton mills, and hosiery mills, And a place that could make you a shoe; There were Brickworks and Train sheds, And Quarries for stone and for sand. And Railways to haul their heavy loads, To places throughout the land. Everything seems smaller now. And much of it has changed. All the old shops have disappeared, And everything seems rearranged. A thriving market once we had, Packed with market stalls. You could stand and eat your mushy peas, And listen to the market’s calls. A man and his son had a roundabout From Shirebrook they hauled their pride.. They set up the rides for the weekend, For the children to enjoy their ride. Mr Froggat would turn the mangle . And round the kids would go. The music would sound as the wheel went round, And the smiles on their faces’ would show. The children would wave to their mothers, As round and round they went. And when it stopped, the children knew, That all their money was spent. Now Mansfield is a different place, And the big shops have all but gone. Charity, Café’s and Barbers shops Replaced them, and not just one!. There are empty shops around the town, It would be better to see them taken. Nothing would please the town folk more. Than to see the old place awaken. The Supermarkets have made the change, To our shopping habits you see. Now all the things are under one roof, They say it’s better for you and for me. The children now have their computers, They show pictures and colours with pride. With fields of green and skies so blue, We called it ” Playing Outside “.
  20. IAN123.

    All Kinds of Everything.

    Clumber Street.1912 Thomas Cook Poster.Hope some poor soul got off at Cobh.
  21. I don't remember some of the teachers you mention. I started at BGS in 1968, so perhaps a little while after you. Remember Mr Downing well and am surprised at your description of him
  22. IAN123.

    All Kinds of Everything.

    Wollaton St.and The County Hotel.Cinemas ..The Gaumont and Elite can be seen...shame The Hand Inn went...liked the Red Barrel..A late 1940's Angel Row.Perrys and Liptons were replaced in the 1960's...previously i have mentioned the Wallpaper & Paint shop.
  23. mercurydancer

    Nottinghams Heritage Assets

    Oh. I love the Nottingham of my childhood, but there it remains. In my childhood. The fogs, the smells, the buildings, the buses and the neighbourhoods. All a long time ago. I do think that with a little sense, things like the Central market could thrive again. With the emerging trend for organic and fresh food, a city centre market providing excellent quality food, cheeses, wines, meat, then this would be possible. My example would be the Borough Market in Southwark. Nottingham is crying out for this type of market! I do not share the cynicism that Nottingham is not worth its salt. It is a beautiful city, it has much in its favour. Certainly it is not like it was, but we are where we are. It is pretty in a way that Newcastle, Manchester and Leeds are not. It is certainly thriving. It is relatively safe. I could take you to towns like Middlesbrough where it is decidedly NOT safe. At night Boro is positively dangerous. Nottingham is not anywhere near as menacing. Nottingham is also interesting. It has bars which equal those in London and for curry it beats any city hands down... I am talking about curry corner on MMW and Mount Street. Although it does not specifically have a China Town, Chinese restaurants are good. There are many interesting restaurants which I have neither the time or money to go to, but they are there. I am all for the Lace market being full of curious cocktail bars and clubs. The unique building structures (Well at a push some parts of Leeds do look like that) have the potential, to be wonderful quirky places and deeply fascinating. I went to Mundella so I know the Embankment well. It is still lovely. A peaceful walk along the river, and so close to the town is a joy. OK I will admit, if Arkwright Street still existed, the walk into town would be immensely better. Real ale. A subject near to my heart, but probably will stop off in my liver. Nottingham excels at real ales. I am amazed at the high quality and availability of superb beers. It really is stupendous. Every week there is a pub or bar opening that serves good quality beers. Nottingham is quite compact compared to some other cities, so the competition provided by pubs increases the quality and the different types of beers. I dont have a beard, a notebook or a beer-stained jumper, but I do admire the work of Notts CAMRA. However, I would say to CAMRA - stop now, you have won. I rubbed the rose tint off my glasses a long time ago, but every time I return to Nottingham I find it a resurgent exciting and beautiful city.
  24. IAN123.

    All Kinds of Everything.

    Four drizzlers from the past.The original Smalleys Shop on Derby Rd. (Still have me Dads old pliabus.)The Corner Pin and a wet Lower Parliament St.
  25. Imagine the tabloid frenzy if that had gone any further !
  26. MargieH

    Time Lord!

    So are you now warming to the idea of a female doctor, Phil? Or was it your wife who was watching?
  27. Rob.L

    Time Lord!

    TBI, Ah, Wheeler Dealers. Better to record it so that you can fast forward through the parts when Mike Brewer is on. As a presenter, he’s more irritating than a dose of head lice.
  28. nonnaB

    All Kinds of Everything.

    Knitting for pin money Kath. I did that as I had a knitting machine. I knit all the jumpers and cardi's for both my children also a little pleated skirt for Deborah gloves and mittens with matching hats. I made quite a bit making for a small shop but then it became too demanding. My mum and dad both had machines and knitted to sell. My brother was in the army and dad designed a chart with the emblem of his group. The first time he wore it he was called into the office by his superiors and he thought ohoh I'm in trouble for wearing my new sweater. He was interrogated as to how did he get it and who made it etc. When he told them his dad had designed it and knitted it while his mum had sewn it together , his superior said " ok we want 22 of them making and they havent to be repeated to anyone else." Talk about busy bees there was navy blue wool everywhere. These were made for the "Blowpipe" troup and were a great success. It started a craze for having special designs made for kids and adults alike.
  1. Load more activity