carni

Scon or Scone?

Recommended Posts

All this baking - there's going to be some doors worth knocking on about mid-morning tomorrow ! Shall I bring some Devon cream up?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clotted cream, Strawberry Jam (Raspberry for me if you don't mind) and just to be really really naughty, some Lurpak butter. :crazy: :crazy: :crazy: :crazy:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9c2eb481-34ea-45f5-9513-b74d168f32bc.jpg

#43 Darkazana,

Thank-you for your recipe, this is my first attempt. Better than my past efforts. As we speak, most of them have already been eaten! Yum Yum Yum

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:biggrin: I consider myself a dab hand at making scones: I either make fruit scones with sultanas or dates - these are delicious - or I make plain scones and serve them with Strawberry Jam and Double Cream....................

thumbsup

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No one on the thread a fan of cheese scons then? :( lovely with a spreading of butter!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yes, yes Pixie! Provided you are going to eat them up quickly (and who wouldn't), add a pinch of mixed herbs and a bit of chopped onion to the mix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Minus the herbs.. but some caramelized onions don't go a miss!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pupcakes

CVpuEnaWEAIAzdL.jpg

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's interesting reading how English has and still is evolving, over here, stateside, there are still some remnants of old English still used in everyday speaking, like "I dove into the water" or "He pled guilty"

Presumably you're talking about the US/UK divide? I've been expressly told by a retired US solicitor friend that US English is based on the dictionary that went over with the founding fathers. That is the reason for some of the different spellings and, even, pronunciations. It's the Brits that have changed the language not the Americans. What I don't get about the US language is the way they bastardise latin derived works such as "paedofile". Paed means 'child' in Latin but 'ped' (as they say it) means 'foot'. So, how do they manage with such things in court? I'm surprised some clever wag hasn't used that to get off a charge.

And, it's scone as far as I'm aware.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But Ian, what about 'gone' and 'done'. They have an 'e' at the end as well, so it could be ' scon' or even 'scun'. Or what about the Stone of Scone? I was told it is pronounced 'scoon'. What a strange language we have!

I think there are 7 ways to pronounce the letters 'ough' within a word....

enough (uff) through (oo) though (o) thought (or) bough (ow) trough (off) Peterborough (a, or similar depending where you live!)

I say scone with a long 'o' same as you anyway! All this talking about them is making me hungry - must make some from the old Be-Ro recipe book with the pages that keep falling out...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

True,Margie our lingo is odd,you have words with several meanings! Talking of nice things,Plantfits mincepie recipe was very addictive, Remy martin in da mix!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...