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You were very lucky not to have been harmed yourselves in the fire,quick thinking on you part no doubt, you take care of yourself Mary

 

Rog

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Don't know anything about this one fogrider apart from I took the pictures a few years ago at the Woodhall Spa country show, perhaps we can draw on your expertise

 

woodhall_show.jpg

woodhall_show_(1).jpg

 

Or any of the Vintage vehicles fans

 

Rog

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Beautiful machine, looks American somehow, glad I'm not the one that has to swing that starting handle tho'.

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Reminds me of an early aero engine,two spark plugs per cyclinder?

right hand drive?

 

Rog

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Had a poke round and I think it is American, quite a few were made right hand drive around the time of WW1.

The bonnet design makes me think it's FCD, - C... Fire Dept.

 

Edit:

 

Found it, it's a 1929 Seagrave. 16ltr petrol side-valve engine..    thumbsup

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Brew, you are a star. well done mate,that's another one solved thanks to Nottstalgia, now, what's the meaning of life?

 

Rog

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Darn you beat me to it Jill.

 

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Only just seen this Seagrave photo, fantastic thing, the older yankee fire trucks always impressive, many were volunteer departments thus able to buy what they wanted and "tart" them up as they pleased.

No such thing in the UK as they belonged to the local council, under control of the Home Office.  Wash, polish, repair when needed,  remained as factory.

One concession  was when registered, Cities like Nottingham retained 999 numbers for the fire appliances. 

 

This has reminded me of the first "decent size" fire I went to , around summer, 1968, on Leengate, Dunkirks area. Dri- Pack salt and the Bell Fruit Company. Real adventures then as there was no safety rules at all, you can't break rules that don't exist !

Happy days. 

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Dakins and Moons were big fires when i lived locally..66891-1-640-640-UNPAD.jpgOne for Fogrider..Talbot St.the next day.

Amazed Pope & Parr didn't go up.

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I went to that Dakins fire. Was on one of the first machines to attend. I have clear memories of most of it, especially the Salvation Army feeding us corned beef sandwiches with tea in white enamel mugs , a scene straight out of a WW2 film  ! ,that was around 6 am. The heat from Dakins smashed all the glass in Berry and Underwood on the opposite side of Talbot Street, 100 ft away.

The student flats, Bowman house is on the same site.

Did'nt go to Moons, I think that was before I joined.

Regards all...….

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No, I'm sorry but I don't remember them, I know there were various features of Central in the external stone work- the fireman on the main entrance corner , the two lions inside on the bottom of the stairs in the main entrance, that marvellous City Crest laid in Marble - main entrance again, did I miss something at Central ? or are they on the old Victorian Station on South Sherwood Street ?

 

Can't wait to hear what ?

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They were on the firestation door frames..on Shakespeare St.

I was told when a nipper..the joiners did contracts for Churches and Chapels..and incorporated their'flair' into Central also.65299-1-640-640-UNPAD.jpg

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Snapped from Trent Poly roof.52325-1-280-99999-unpad.jpg sixties shot of Central, Moons, Clinton,YWCA, Bills Chippy. The factory fell into disrepair and was grassed after demolition.

So many memories!

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Well, I really didn't remember seeing those carvings !. Mind you, firemen were not to use the main entrance. We entered via the yard , even the upstairs was "not allowed" as only office staff went up there. Many happy memories of the old place, was amazed  to see it was still there when we visited a couple of months ago, I thought the whole idea was to demolish Central ?

Anyway, the B+W photo above confuses me, what was that factory building ?, I can only remember what was the fabulous old main library, now Uni, I think. Right opposite the Victorian fire station which, I believe, is allowed to remain.

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Fog..that was Taylors Mill..employed over 100 staff at one time..including 2 stokers!54751-1-280-99999-unpad.jpgFrom this angle you can see it's size..the vantage point being the Victorian section of Central.

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1964 Taylors Mill was being pulled down and the Newton Building was extended right upto the Lending Library.65225-1-280-99999-unpad.jpgAs seen here in August 1967.( the new stone being whiter.)

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Thanks Ian, I didn't move to Nottingham until early '67 so I guess I missed it, loved that old library, magnificent inside and out

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When i started this thread..i did'nt realise i would learn so much!52621538-1dd37ebc-e766-4bf2-918d-e55019bNever thought about firefighters during WW2....a couple of 1940's local lads pictured.fire-brigade2.jpg

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2 fantastic photo's !, the main one shows two pre-war Leylands, the guys covered in foam, the guy in the middle shouldering a No2 foam making branch. Protein  foam compound  smelled  FOUL !.Brewed up, apparently, from 'bulls blood and bollocks'. It expanded 9 to 1 with water for use on petrol/oil type fires. Could be after 1941 as the length of rolled up hose is the Canadian type, bought in after British manufacturers got together to put the price up, screwing the Home Office in their desperation for hose.!

 

The lower photo is a Bedford heavy pump unit, the crew have AFS cap badges, probably 1939 to 1941.maybe their new toy?

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