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Apparently one of my ancestors lived (and died) on Moor Lane in Carlton, but I've been unable to find out where this was. Anybody got any ideas?

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Looking on the 1871 Census , the preceding road appears to be Front Street and before that "Whose Bridge" (which I assume is Ousebridge) especially as The Royal Oak pub is listed there ? 

The road after Moor Lane is Station Lane . 

We need a map expert !

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I wonder if Moor Lane is an error in some way ?  It's not unknown on census returns.

 

And where is Station Lane ?  There's Station Road in Carlton/Netherfield, but I don't know of a Lane anywhere.

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Considering how they wrote Whose Bridge instead of Ouse Bridge  you may be right .  I thought Moor Road may have been whats now Conway Road . Maybe some surnames will be on the following 1881 Census still in the same house as 10 years previous .

 

Edit : A few of the names on the 1871 Census appear on the 1881 Census on Netherfield Lane .Ouse Bridge is spelt correctly . Netherfield Lane follows Station Lane and there's mention of Fox and Hounds pub with the Railway Stationmaster next to that if that helps . 

 

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The census enumerators were nothing if not inventive with their spelling. My gt grandfather, Sam Ward, is usually shown as being born in either Wella, Whella, Wheller or Weller. Where was he born? WELLOW!  It was actually Ompton but I don't like to be too pedantic!

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We were stuck once trying to find a Birch relative in the Manchester area.  Had to hire a researcher in the end and she found the family under the name Brick!  Apparently the census was outsourced to India to be transcribed, and a lot of things got lost in translation. 

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3 hours ago, DAVIDW said:

 A few of the names on the 1871 Census appear on the 1881 Census on Netherfield Lane .Ouse Bridge is spelt correctly . Netherfield Lane follows Station Lane and there's mention of Fox and Hounds pub with the Railway Stationmaster next to that if that helps . 

 

That area is traceable on maps from the 1870s. Station Lane (probably should be Street) is the present-day Station Road; and Netherfield Lane is virtually the present-day Victoria Road......and those two locations have the Fox & Hounds pub at their centre.

 

And finally; there is a Moor Street nearby.

 

When Affer Gorritt returns, he needs to tell us the time period in question. 

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Sorry meduck! The address is indeed mentioned in the 1871 Census. Here's the news article that started me off.

Martha-Brooks-Inquest-Nottinghamshire-Gu

 

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       Moor Lane is the antiquarian name of the road that is now Station Road/Victoria Road. In 1846 the Midland Railway opened the Nottingham Lincoln line dissecting this road. Thus becoming Station Lane North of the railway. I presume this was down to the locals referring to recognise it leading to the railway station. In 1871, Netherfield didn't exist as a place in its own right, being classed as part of Carlton. This explains why Moor Lane is listed as the road in question. In 1871 few houses existed South of the railway. There was a row of terraced houses on the right hand side leading from the station. its quite likely this is the row of houses in question as this part of the road was quite likely to have retained its original name. The name seemed to swap to Netherfield Lane in the mid 1870's when Colwick locomotive sheds and sidings were being built. By 1881 the name had become official. It became Victoria Road in 1889 on the queens jubilee. Not sure when Station Lane became Station Road, probably when it became built on. I don't know if it's still there but in the 1990's a Netherfield Lane name board was still attached to the shop facing Meadow Road. 100 years since it had been called by that name. 

        Regarding  Conway Road, it was a lane, but I'm not sure if was actually a public right of way at that time. Turning onto Conway Road from Station Road, as you pass Conway Avenue, the road narrows. On the left is an old chapel, where a waterway ran alongside. There was a bridge over the water and I'm sure there was a gate across the road at this point. I could be wrong. My brain cells sometimes travel in a parallel universe to the rest of me.

      All the above is from memory, I hope I don't mislead anyone.

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That's a great list of memories Dark Angel ! 

 

A couple of points to add, based on looking at various old maps. Station Road in its earliest version (early 1900s) seems to have curved round to include part of what is now Manor Road. The present length of Station Road up to Carlton Square was variously called Brook Street and Urban Road for a while, before eventually becoming part of Station Road.

 

On the subject of Conway Road, what years are you talking about with the chapel and bridge/gate ?

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Thanks Dark Angel! I knew there would be some erudite person (or clever bogger!) that could help!

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     Apologies Cliff Ton, I was referring to 1870's 1880's in answer to Affer Gorrits query, but adding the bit about Conway Road it seemed like I was referring to the same time period. I should have made it clearer, I was in fact talking about early twentieth century. Conway Road  was built early 1920's. The waterway had already been rerouted to join up with sewer water and ran in a culvert joining the main sewer that runs alongside the railway line. When I say waterway, it was basically a dyke which filled with water after heavy rain, once the flow had been diverted. Beyond the chapel stood a big house fronted by a large wall topped by stone balls, there followed a brick wall with I think three wooden gates, these were rear entrances to some large houses including Eastmoor House.

     All before my time, but I gleaned a lot of info from reading old documents. I don't remember the chapel in use as such, nor the gate.

    My first recollection of the chapel was of it being an empty building, ironically it's still there. Been used in various capacities over time.

     My assumption being that if those large houses had gates in brick walls, there had to be some form of bridle or footpath for the occupants to use. 

     A bit of useless information: in 1964 the front lawn and path of a house sank, (not a sinkhole) but a fair sized depression,  caused by an underground spring.

    When the railway station was built, it actually served Gedling and Carlton. In 1846 it was more likely to be used by Gedling residents as the bottom end of Carlton wasn't heavily populated. Making sense that Station Lane emanated from the direction of Gedling.

     Trying to transport yourself back to a bygone era can be tricky, especially when roads and areas  have name changes over time.

     Have come across Brooke Street, in 1890's some workmen laying sewers found some artefacts dating from Roman era and 14th century. Another dusty bit of info I had forgotten. (The same sewerage system mentioned above).

 

         An amendment: The house affected by an underground spring is in Conway Avenue.

        

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   AfferGorritt, forgot to mention, there are photos of Netherfield that show this row of houses, not brilliant, but may give an idea of where your ancestor lived. Have taken a photo of a postcard from a book but unable to put it on here. Maybe Cliff Ton has one in his library.

 

  Cliff Ton, Conway Road is doing nothing for my sanity! My memories don't correspond with any maps. Have looked at maps dated 1878, 1883, 1885, 1899, 1901, 1919, 1921, 1938. 

  Would a private road be shown on maps? Somethings not right and it's bugging me.

  Have found a photograph which shows part of the wall I mentioned previously, which I have cropped, to remove the person featured on it. Unable to put it on here. 

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Re; the Conway Road chapel, gate, water, etc etc.

 

Old maps from around 1900 show the chapel on Conway Road (which didn't extend beyond the chapel - it was a cul-de-sac). The nearest water to that location is a small stream north of Conway Road (north of Elm Drive) and continuing north under Freeman's Terrace. That stream doesn't seem to be there today.

rs67c2w.jpg

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A photo would be fantastic if possible!

 

Dark Angel, if I pm you my email address, do you think you could send it?

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     Thanks  Cliff Ton, however, the building the arrow is pointing to is 13 Conway Road. Demolished to make way for a row of dolls houses.

The mysterious chapel should be to the right of the arrow head. Maybe not as old as I originally thought, although on the 1919 map a building that shape is actually situated at the end of Conway Road. At first glance I thought it may have been the out buildings to 1 Conway Avenue drawn in the wrong place. Now I have doubts. On the 1938 map, it is shown where it now stands.

    The person who paddled in the water and swung on the gate would have done this somewhere around1915 to the building of Conway Road. Another person who had been a long term resident of Conway Avenue, told me a steam engine used to use the road. I either wasn't paying attention or my brain cells are not working. Another person who used to tell me about the area was a groundsman employed on the bowling greens.

      Also, it seems that the large house demolished for those horrible flats, fronted by the wall with stone balls on the top, was not as old as I thought. 

     The flow of water was diverted and culverted in the 1890's. Some maps do show water, particularly the area in front of the railway where the fish pond used to be on the bowling green. Filled in because of health and safety, allegedly, more likely couldn't be bothered to maintain it. The map also indicates the boundary line as being a lot straighter than it actually is, it's more of a dog's leg in reality.

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17 hours ago, Dark Angel said:

     Thanks  Cliff Ton, however, the building the arrow is pointing to is 13 Conway Road. Demolished to make way for a row of dolls houses.

The mysterious chapel should be to the right of the arrow head. Maybe not as old as I originally thought, 

 

I see what you mean about the chapel being further along. And looking at various old maps, it doesn't appear until at least the late 1920s-early 30s.

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   Beginning to wonder if it was connected to the building of the bowling green, council housing estate and road.

   Although this is at odds with what I thought.

   i either misunderstood what I was told, or my memory is not working.

   The gardens adjoining the bowling green used to flood on a regular basis until the mid eighties.

   Sadly, I can no longer ask questions.

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This is from the 1880s, showing the area before Conway road was even started (I've marked where it would be).

 

The colouring is original, done by Ordnance Survey, and they've marked some kind of water feature which runs alongside the railway line. It fits with your flooding/bowling green theory.

OekME4S.jpg

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          Interesting. The water shown lies between the railway and the sewer, if it is the sewer to Stoke, then it's showing it diving under the railway in the wrong place. It doesn't do that until it gets to the Ouse Dyke. My brain hurts.

          The large houses on Conway Road were built 1883/1885. I think. My mind at the moment is not playing with me.

           There is an Eric Morecombe sketch with Andre Previn, in which he says: " I am playing all the right notes, not necessarily in the right order." Think that applies to information coming from my memory banks.

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If the area was prone to flooding then the railway will have been built up on an embankment and those 2 areas of water will have formed after the railway.

Or were intentionally formed to keep the railway line drained.

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