catfan

Such a simple idea.

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Just been reading about Nottm uni students devised an idea to remove those big lumps of concrete inside washing machines that give stability, replace with a water fill-able plastic container instead.

Such a simple idea that I am amazed that no one thought of this before !

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40821915

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I worked on Hoover Keymatics for a while back in the 60s.  Unless I'm getting really forgetful, I don't think thy had any weights of any kind.  The drum and drive motor were mounted on strong springs which allowed movement but kept things stable.   The weight of the motor tended to keep the drum steady.   They were heavy blighters though.  If we had to bring one into the shop two of us always went out to get it.

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I remember what I believe were the first automatic washing machines - Bendix. They had massive steel frames, weighed enough to require two or three men to deliver them and had to be concreted into the floor.

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I remember a laundromat in Netherfield when  I was a kid.  I know they were all Bendix machines.  Not many folks had any kind of washing machines in the house back then.  First I remember was a tiny little Hoover with a mangle on the top.  An aunt of mine had one.

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There used to be a laundromat on Mansfield Road in Sherwood in the early/mid01960s. If I remember right the machines took half crowns, then there were spin dryers (threepenny bits) and tumble driers (sixpences).

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That sounds like the one my mother and aunt used to hire one night a week in the 50s.

Definitely a step up from the copper and ponch,and the mangle outside,

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Those old Hoovers  had a thing like a little propeller built into the side of the tub.  Made you wonder if it could ever agitate the water enough to clean anything. :rolleyes:

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2 hours ago, benjamin1945 said:

That sounds like the one my mother and aunt used to hire one night a week in the 50s.

Definitely a step up from the copper and ponch,and the mangle outside,

Did your rubber liberty bodice buttons ever get caught in the mangle.

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Yes Gem..........i'm sure they flew off at times.................lol.

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Sold quite a few of the Keymatics in the mid '70s. I don't know what the early slant fronts were like inside but the later ones sat on suspension struts. Could be mistaken but I think there was a concrete bit on the underside of the drum. Could never understand why Keymatics were dearer, the programmer was less reliable and folk sometimes lost the square bits.

 

The propeller/agitator in the twin-tubs was a bit small but actually worked surprisingly well. The big Hotpoint agitators were better though.

 

I remember when I was a kid, me and mam used to lug the washing to the launderette on Arkwright St which was known locally as 'the bendix'.

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I didn't like going to the bendix after one incident when I was about six. We'd gone there in the winter and it was chucking down with rain, I was perished. Inside were several huge tumble dryers and one had just been emptied. I could feel the heat still coming out. So I stuck my wet head in, then I leant in and stuck my arms and body in. Ooh lovely. Next thing someone's got my legs and yanked me out, falling flat on my face. It was the old bag who gave out the cups of washing powder. Gave me a right ear-bending then mam came over and gave me a clip round the other tab. And after I'd carried all the bleddy washing too! 

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#10.     Mostly worked on the slanted front Keymatics.  The more upright ones were just coming in about the time I left the UK in 1970.      We didn't replace too many program switches.  Biggest problem as they aged was that the bearings would collapse.  The inner drum would then hit the outer drum and score the vitreous enamel off it.  They would sound like a very unhappy cement mixer.  The owner would get pretty unhappy to.  It needed a new tub, new bearings seals etc.. Several hours work.  We would bring them into the shop.  Didn't want to tackle that in somebodies kitchen.  BIG repair bill.

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