edthefolkie

Members
  • Content Count

    24
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

6 Someone likes what I write

About edthefolkie

  • Rank
    Newbie

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Leicestershire
  • Interests
    Vernacular & local history, railways, photography, Notts & Derbys me duck, music, you name it....

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Errrrr… no. Even DSes, IDs etc couldn't lift up the appropriate corner, although they could drive along on 3 wheels and a flat tyre if necessary. The whole car, went up or down depending on the setting of the lever. The highest setting is the one used for wheel changing, but it is up to the driver to (a) ensure that the car has reached the correct height and (b) ensure that the jack is adjusted and in a safe place - like any jack. This is all covered in the manual, but people don't read manuals, do they! At least the top of the jack didn't generally go straight through the sills, as was my experience with more than one fairly new Brit vehicle. As for BMC's wonderful Hydrolastic cheapo version of the Système Citroën, the less said the better.
  2. Rob, I love the old slides. I thought "Blimey, they're good!" and then read that they were taken by a pro (your dad) using a Leica/Summicron so that explains it. Great stuff. These slides are a valuable record - because they're colour apart from anything else. How many colour shots of the old Drury Hill have you seen? Especially as they're Kodachrome which doesn't fade or shift, unlike Ektachrome and Agfa. The only problem with Kodachrome-X and 64 is that they tend to give a magenta cast in shadows, unlike KII and K25. Hope you don't mind me giving my experiences of scanning. I've been doing my old slides (back to 1965) for some years, frying my brain in the process. When other people start on this herculean task I advise them to either get them done professionally on a drum scanner - unfortunately this can be VERY expensive - or buy an Epson flatbed/second hand Nikon Coolscan. The little "scanners" which are sold by Lidl and everybody else are not actually line by line scanners at all - they are fairly low res digital cameras which don't do full justice to slides. Especially Kodachrome ones taken with a Leica! I use an Epson V700 flatbed. I was quite happy with my old Epson 3170 until I was persuaded, in the pub of course, into upgrading by a friend who produces incredible results with one. Mind you, he is a perfectionist. The great advantage of the V700 is that it does 12 slides at a time instead of 4, so it's possible to watch TV & load the next 12 during the commercials. The supplied Epson Scan software does a reasonable job on magenta shifts etc - you just tick the "colour restoration" box. However it's a good idea to optimise slides after scanning using Photoshop CS, Elements (comes free with new Epson scanners) or Picasa, which is free from Google. And there are of course other good tools. The V700 does speed up scanning considerably but it's only worth the expense IMHO if you have thousands of slides. It's currently around £500 but if you only want to do 4 at a time 3170s come up on Fleabay for about 50 quid. For a s/h Nikon Coolscan, the sky seems to be the limit, crazily. Any other advice? Do not bin the slides after you've scanned them. Apart from anything else, good ones can be worth money. AND, only spend a couple of hours at a time on scanning, however you scan, otherwise you will start getting the headaches and finding yourself in a self inflicted timewarp. Bit like this forum really (ducks hastily).
  3. Certainly was owned by the Stevensons - I used to work with Kathryn S who was married to one of 'em. Where are you Kathryn?? We had a staff do at the Commodore in the 90's I think. Coach up the motorway, LOTS of free or cheap drink. I won a bottle of whisky in the raffle & we finished it on the way home. One of our lot fell over a rock in his front garden and did himself quite a mischief.
  4. The last black & white shot was of a brand new Shippo's Foden which was used by a bunch of Nottingham High School lads (and a few masters) to drive across Europe. Think "Summer Holiday" only with beer and tents. And no girls, or for that matter Cliff and the Shadows. There were 3 or 4 lorry trips in the 60s, the 1965 team have just had a reunion at the High School. Free (Old Dalby) Shippos apparently. As somebody said, beer is the secret of happiness and longevity. I don't think he meant old style Shippo's though, that stuff all too often had the tang of Basford Gasworks! Remember the song to the tune of "Men of Harlech"? "All the men of Shipstones Brewery Drink stale ale and f**t like fury" Tee hee.
  5. Come to think of it, there are some other candidates for Firbeck at Chilwell. There's a cut down 1950s coach which was converted to transport the 1908 replica charabanc, also a late 1950s AEC Reliance (the "ghost bus", URR 865) which has been rescued from a field in Suffolk. I think they've got an open day on September 13th actually, if anybody fancies negotiating the tram works outside! Just don't utter the word "tram" when Simon Barton's around.
  6. NAS 624, mentioned earlier, was indeed a government surplus AEC Matador. It looked a bit different at Chilwell Garage in 1950 though! My dad is standing left - I think they were pulling tree stumps. The wrecking crew had to go out at all hours in the Matador and the cab was slightly basic! So later on the ever resourceful Barton body builders cobbled together a new cab complete with space for repair kits etc. An excellent chap called Jolyon bought the Matador and restored it some years ago, don't know if he still owns it.
  7. Hi Chris, you are doing some fantastic work here. Anybody who used to frequent "The Vic" will tell you that it was the most haunting place - I don't know quite how, but you've really captured the atmosphere. As an example of Vic weirdness, the hydraulic tower (yes, the building did contain the power source for the luggage lifts) used to emit public lavatory/digeridoo echoing burbly noises, even in the 1960s. I guess therefore that the lifts were still used then. When you get fed up with drawing endless girders and beige glazed brickwork island buildings, maybe there's a sound file somewhere which would suit? Another good wheeze would be to provide an alternate version of the north and south gables with the original 1900 "art nouveau" style steel and glass windbreaks. I believe they were replaced by the horrible corrugated iron (or asbestos) ones during WW2. We used to see Britannias, Halls, O4s, O1s, WDs, B1s, A5s, Black 5s etc etc there. Even a Duchess (City of Nottingham), a Schools (Cheltenham), a West Country (Salisbury) and Mallard in LNER blue! So your loco bill might become rather substantial.....
  8. Ewe Lamb Lane (you have no idea what fun I have had with that street name over the years)
  9. Hi folks, this is all very interesting. I think the waggonway on Moor Lane may be wishful thinking, although I would love there to have been one. The "railway station" near Coventry Lane sounds like one of the Midland Railway's ploys to get coal traffic from nearby collieries. After all the Midland and the Great Northern were in constant punch-ups to get coal, and hence money, on to their own lines. Look at the MR's London Extension to St Pancras, and all the GNR lines in Notts/Derbys which went in the 1960s. I'm sure there were some sidings on the Radford-Trowell line near Coventry Lane - or is it old age? We used to live in Bramcote - my sister went to Bramcote Grammar in the 60s and I remember Alan Dance from Nottingham High School. Did Alan say whether the new book would be generally available (eg on the web) or just in Beeston W H Smith etc? I don't get over to Bramcote/Beeston much since me mum passed on a few years ago, although I have occasionally been seen in the Vic in Beeston (and the Brunswick in Derby, and the Alexandra, etc etc ).
  10. Tell yer what duck, I were doubled up watching that. And I didn't understand half of it! I think living south of Leicester has atrophied me Dottigub Detector or should it be me Ilson Informator.
  11. Mick2me, who started the thread, mentioned a model railway layout at Pearson's, which I do remember. Think it was narrow gauge (Eggerbahn), may be wrong, it's a long time ago. Everything about Pearson's model department in the 1960s was thanks to a gent called Mike Skidmore. He was a dab hand at railway modelling and particularly painting and lining locos. In fact I bought one off him once - a Hornby Dublo Duchess. It's still around somewhere but God knows where, and it's in bits anyway. Mike's lair was all too tempting as I worked across the road at Barclays and hadn't discovered expensive girls and unreliable cars. I think Mike went off to Millholme Models, Woodborough in the late 60s or early 70s. They had a fantastic model railway but unfortunately not enough customers! Pearsons also had a GOOD record department (as mentioned by others), I've still got a couple of vinyl albums from there (32/6d each or similar). Island, original pink label. What a sad person I am.
  12. The great thing about the Playhouse in that era was that you didn't have to be a culture vulture. I mean. there was a punchup on the opening night. Sitting in the front row watching Arthur Seaton throw up on stage was not exactly Chekov, either. The place was usually packed out, there were other things going on besides the actual plays, and of course there was the Playhouse bar next door to the auditorium. A few of us ne'er do wells used to sit outside in the summer drinking orrible Trophy or summat, probably in order to stare at the gorgeous girl with the St. Bernard! I don't know if the bar ever got busted, but a very large lump of some substance wrapped in Baco foil dropped out from the seat cushions & rolled across the floor when we were inside once! Oops, sorry Constable.
  13. Some of this posting was in the Transport thread and I thought it ought to be in the Swingin' 60s too, hope nobody minds! Anybody remember the Playhouse in its early days on East Circus Street - or even on Goldsmith Street? Somebody asked about a show called Owd Yer Tight, written by Emrys Bryson, which was on in 1965. I should have gone to see it but didn't although I was in the Playhouse Club at the time, and had seen the young Ian McKellen in Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, also other plays. I was probably short of cash as I was only 18! 'Owd Yer Tight featured John Neville and Ronald Magill (later of Emmerdale) who also directed the show. I don't recognise most of the other players but they were regulars in the 1960s. Emrys Bryson did a little book, based on the show, also called 'Owd Yer Tight and I bought it for my dad in 1967. He gave it back to me before he died. It's a combination of much of the stuff later to appear in his "Portrait of Nottingham" and lots of doggerel and jokes. The "Notts as she is spoke" bits are there as is some vintage smut. One can just about work out which bits were in the play - I wonder if somebody at the Playhouse has a script? I suppose you could define the show as "That Was The City That Was". Part of the introduction consists of this gem by Donald Cotton: Floreat Arboretum! Et Jessicus Booticus Playing fields of Long Eaton And Spartan Barton Bus. All of these have come to mean Nottingham - the Midland Queen. Floreat Arboretum! Most blessed of central parks; This plot, this other Eden, And similar remarks. Where sheep may graze, all unattacked But yet do not, in point of fact. Eternal city on the Trent! Thy image never fails To warm the heart Flung far apart Beyond thy plastic pails. O, God, to see the gasworks come Across the moon at Nottingham! Stands Woolworths where it used to be? (No! Ed) And are there kippers still for tea? Floreat Arboretum! The bells are not so rare In summer time on Bredon As in the Market Square. When East meets West, the bit between Is Nottingham - the Midlands Queen. The first night was in the presence of the Lord Mayor, his lady, Lord Goodman and Jennie Lee, the Minister for the Arts. I don't know what Alderman Derbyshire thought of the featured quote from Mr Arthur Seaton - "I'd put all them fat-gutted councillors in the castle and blow them all sky-high together."
  14. Hi Hawarden, actually I do know something about this. It's just the title of the 1965 show (and later book) and there wasn't much about buses in it! I ought to have gone to see the show but didn't although I was in the Playhouse Club at the time, and had seen the young Ian McKellen in Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, also other plays. I was probably short of cash as I was only 18! 'Owd Yer Tight featured John Neville and Ronald Magill (later of Emmerdale) who also directed the show. I don't recognise most of the other players but they were regulars in the 1960s. Emrys Bryson did a little book, based on the show, also called 'Owd Yer Tight and I bought it for my dad in 1967. He gave it back to me before he died. It's a combination of much of the stuff later to appear in "Portrait of Nottingham" and lots of doggerel and jokes. The "Notts as she is spoke" bits are there as is some vintage smut. One can just about work out which bits were in the play - I wonder if somebody at the Playhouse has a script? I suppose you could define the show as "That Was The City That Was". Part of the introduction consists of this gem by Donald Cotton: Floreat Arboretum! Et Jessicus Booticus Playing fields of Long Eaton And Spartan Barton Bus. All of these have come to mean Nottingham - the Midland Queen. Floreat Arboretum! Most blessed of central parks; This plot, this other Eden, And similar remarks. Where sheep may graze, all unattacked But yet do not, in point of fact. Eternal city on the Trent! Thy image never fails To warm the heart Flung far apart Beyond thy plastic pails. O, God, to see the gasworks come Across the moon at Nottingham! Stands Woolworths where it used to be? (No! Ed) And are there kippers still for tea? Floreat Arboretum! The bells are not so rare In summer time on Bredon As in the Market Square. When East meets West, the bit between Is Nottingham - the Midlands Queen. The first night was in the presence of the Lord Mayor, his lady, Lord Goodman and Jennie Lee, the Minister for the Arts. I don't know what Alderman Derbyshire thought of the featured quote from Mr Arthur Seaton - "I'd put all them fat-gutted councillors in the castle and blow them all sky-high together."
  15. Iliffe and Baguley did about 20 books - there were two on Edwardian Nottingham as well. They were printed by Derry and Sons and were indeed quite expensive. I've got 10 or 12 of them, a few from a cheapo bookshop in Beeston about 10 years ago for about 2 quid each! They had LOADS of them. I think they are still obtainable secondhand for not a lot, have a look on the web. They did themselves no favours I reckon as they saturated the market by putting out more and more rehashes of the same stuff, printed on nastier paper. I think also that the inflation of the 1970s basically made the whole thing uneconomic, not enough nottstalgia freaks then! But the original books were blinking well brilliant, if a bit selective - for instance they did a good feature on Nottingham pubs and ale, but nowt I think on Shippos brewery. The feature on Nottingham High School was amazing (er I'm an Old Nottinghamian). I think D J Peters, a teacher at NHS, helped them with the photos for that. As a result of the books coming out, Richard Iliffe and Wilf Baguley kept being given old documents and other stuff - where are they now? They were also the Nottingham Historical Film Unit. I did see a photo somewhere of them filming off the top of the Castle (towards Castle Boulevard and the old Nottingham engine sheds) - what happened to that film and the others? The Internet does not say and as I don't get to Nottm much now I dunno......