Things our parents used to say


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My old mum, now passed, grew up in old St Anne's and knew hard times from being little until she met and married dad, one of her regular sayings was "If you can't afford it wi real money, you can

If anywhere, especially the house, was untidy, my Mum would say. it: 'Looked like Jackie Pownall's' (I believe Pownalls scrap yard was down by the old Vic baths?) Another variation was .'Looks like

An aunt of mine used to say " nothing rhymes with orange" sorry aunts but it doesn't.

"Yer eyes are too big for your belly" when I wanted more and couldn't finish it.

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Hubby said something surprising today, my answer - Well damn my rags.

I haven't heard that one in a while, it's something my mam said.

That must be a toned down US version, my mate Fanny Hill from Wigman Road used to say it all the time except he used the phrase 'Well f### my rags', only person I ever heard use it, perhaps your mam knew his mam.

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We were very refined on the Bells Lane Estate, LOL.

And I thought they had put an end to all that!!!

And now I understand why my folks told me all the "Top Knobs" came from that area!!

But then again , I am in the "Things our parents used to say" thread!!!

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If someone came in the house for a short while we'd say 'are you tekking ya coat off? And they'd say 'nah, I'm not stopping' and we'd laugh. I was like a common saying in those days. But it has made me think about the word 'stopping'. We're going on us 'olidays and we're stopping in Skeggy, or stopping in an 'otel, or stopping in a boarding house. It was never 'staying'.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I was putting something in a cupboard today and said 'in you go, 49'. My mum used to day this when you were putting your foot in a shoe, etc. Have no idea why '49' I know there was a famous policeman PC49 in the 40's and 50's in the telly.

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Know what you mean Mick, we have a couple of blackbirds been trying last weekend, is this a sign of some weather changes?

(the birds are mating = the bods are treading)

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How about in sring, they would say, "The bods is treading"

I can see where confusion arose.

of course I meant SPRING

The Spring is sprung, the grass is ris,

I wonder where the birdys is?

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All I know is, a pair of crows were trying to build a nest in the trees at the back of our house in November !! (I kid you not!), but it kept getting blown away so eventually they gave up , I've got a Cock and Hen Blackbird doing similar now!!

Valentines day (Only 35 days away) is the day that birds are supposed to mate for the Spring

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I can see where confusion arose.

of course I meant SPRING

The Spring is sprung, the grass is ris,

I wonder where the birdys is?

The bird is on the wing, that's absurd,

The wing is on the bird!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi catjay

<"My mam also used the word Rammel, for anything junky. We'd also put the sneck down at night on the front door lock. My husband who came from the Carlton rd area, his mum never heard of sneck before. My parents came from Basford, maybe it was a word used there">

I am from Basford, and the word we used was to put the Snitch on, I have also heard the word used in Sneinton by older people. The word Rammel was used a lot eg "What a load of old Rammel!"

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You'd better goo ta sleep afore ten o clock osses come rahnd.

What the bloody hell was all that about?

Roger

Hi Roger, his is a very old saying and dates back to before World War One. In those days (Late Victorian and Edwardian period) Houseold sewerage was poured into large metal bins.- Not everyone had flush toilets - The containers were collected at night by men driving horse driven carts. They would arrive outside your your house quite late in the evening, remove the used containers and leave disinfected replacements. The clattering of the horses, and the large containers being replaced, were used by parents to frighten children into settling down to sleep.

"Get t' sleep before them ten o'clock 'osses get ya"

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If someone came in the house for a short while we'd say 'are you tekking ya coat off? And they'd say 'nah, I'm not stopping' and we'd laugh. I was like a common saying in those days. But it has made me think about the word 'stopping'. We're going on us 'olidays and we're stopping in Skeggy, or stopping in an 'otel, or stopping in a boarding house. It was never 'staying'.

Hi Katjay

"I'm not stopping - I won't take my coat off." Was the catchphrase of a very popular Yorkshire radio comedian of the 1950s by the name of Ken Platt. I remember that he even had a tv series in the 1960s. Anyway, it was one of those catchphrases that caught on with the public, and you would often hear some one quote it, often in a jokey sort of way.

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Whenever we were sulking,mam used to say "you've got a face as long as a gas mans mac"we never did understand,until later we remembered the gas man use to come and empty the meter,and his coat was nearly touching the ground!,happy days .

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