TBI

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Everything posted by TBI

  1. Sometimes you have to laugh, don't you. As I said I'm ignorant of St Anns as was and looking to learn a bit more. Where was this Alford St then?
  2. Sorry to butt into this, not being an old St Annswellian and all.... Ian's picture and subsequent comment are all correct, it's Alfred St Central, the post box in front of the Post Office, opposite Alison Rise, can be seen in the picture.
  3. Our coal storage facility was also next to the outside toilet like most in the Meadows. It was referred to as the 'coal-house'. It really did seem ridiculously huge. It was converted into a bathroom/toilet and laundry utility and the outside toilet became the new coal-house, perfectly adequate. I remember we got our coal from Tricketts on Blackstone St. A really mucky job I liked as a kid, breaking down the large pieces into cobbles with this great big hatchet and then using a riddle thing to separate the slack. I couldn't have been more than about five or six.
  4. Yes BK, I can actually remember the wires, they went past the end of our street. It would have been easier than going up Turney St and having to turn and go round the island at the top. Not just the 43 though, 41, 45 and 46.
  5. Weren't there trolley wires from the works, down along to the end of Bunbury St and left on to the last section of the Embankment to the gates?
  6. No Waddo, not that we had that much to pinch. As I think back, I never heard of anyone who was burgled or suffered any other crime for that matter. The Meadows reputation back then was undeserved, folk didn't have much but crime rate must have been low. As I said, the police must have been busy elsewhere, apart from the odd community visit to Trent Bridge Juniors we never saw them.
  7. When I was a kid, every year before we went on holiday, I remember mam would always go to that one on Queens Drive corner to let them know we were away. She told me a policeman would then come and check our doors on his rounds. I reckon she was wasting her time though, I can't ever remember actually seeing a copper on the beat in the Medders.
  8. I remember 'special' buses in the sixties which used to park up at the end of the embankment on match days. Not on the turn-round, on that stretch just through the gates. Not sure if they were trolleys though. As CT says, the vast majority of the crowds went up London Rd and on Arky they often spilled on the road holding up traffic..
  9. TBI

    Nottingham Castle

    You ain't missed much, just as the Castle is a castle, Mortimer's Hole is just.... that
  10. TBI

    Nottingham Castle

    Whilst the current edifice may indeed be underwhelming, it is still quite legitimate to call Nottingham Castle a castle. Historic ruins are still referred to as their original function, even if there is little left of the original. There are some small parts of the original castle left, the site is still the same, it certainly resembles a castle even if the main building is a mansion. It's called Nottingham Castle so isn't that enough?
  11. TBI

    How's your day?

    What folk choose to eat is entirely their concern. I know a number of vegetarians and a vegan and none of them have ever presumed to comment on my diet. Just as I wouldn't presume to call their values and beliefs 'self-righteous'.
  12. TBI

    Nottingham Castle

    Actually an opportunity there for the entrepreneurs... top of the range accomodation for well-heeled students. Not so tongue-in-cheek either. I know students often get a bad press on here but a point many don't consider.... in these straitened times Academia is a growth industry. Aside from various establishments of further education in Nottingham and just taking our two Universities, a total business in excess of £1billion per year with 10,000+ jobs. Total students approaching 70,000, imagine the infrastructure and thousands of ancillary jobs to support that. Like them or not, students are a huge part of the City's economy.
  13. TBI

    Poverty Capital

    Yes Willow, that's a later version than the North Circus St one and a great close-up. That particular one in front of the public bogs would soon be joined by a second one next to it. I'm a bit intrigued by the window signs which show a bell, looks like the South Western Bell logo but I think must be a coincidence. Edit.. yes realised it would be the National Telephone Company logo.
  14. TBI

    Poverty Capital

    Yes, certainly looks like one but it appears very basic. As said, there has always been a box at that location. Phone boxes had started to appear around the town centre before the war but were usually bigger and had a telephone sign above. I wonder if that particular one might have been for police use at that time.
  15. TBI

    Last gasp - Players factory demolished

    Again, probably about 1981, an Essex 88. The first of these cars were banned by F1 because they were too fast!
  16. TBI

    Last gasp - Players factory demolished

    Certainly, at least. I suppose there could even have been more than two. Rog's postcard and the memory of early '70s and RR's image, which I would say from the car is definitely around 10 years later. Also check out the other Lotus exotica in the carpark.
  17. TBI

    Last gasp - Players factory demolished

    All I can remember from what My sis told me was "He was a small bloke" bothe Emerson and Ayerton were small, wish I could find the autographed post card,that would confirm, still looking Rog Neither of those, Rog. There seems to be some misunderstanding as to the date of the pic and the 'mid-seventies' quotes. The car is clearly an Essex, so that makes this image at least 1980. The driver, if actually a factory driver, could be Andretti but more likely de Angelis. Might even have been our own old Nige though .. I'm a bit surprised some didn't also pick up on the Mk3 Jag and the Mk 2 Granada estate in the car park .
  18. TBI

    Nottingham Streets

    Folk do do don't dey, JB
  19. TBI

    Another new member

    You were at Mundella a year or two before me then, Roy. It's a shame you left feeling that way. Personally, I found all sorts there, a decent proportion were kids from the poorer backgrounds and not so many I'd call especially 'posh'. Some of those lads were a bit snooty but most of us ignored them and took them for what they were, arses. In contrast, as I think back, the 'posh' girls didn't seem to have airs and graces, some lovely ones as I recall. Yes, that was the West Bridgford Fine Fare manager, Ashton! Peculiar bloke, didn't use folk's actual names, for some reason called everyone 'Sab'.
  20. TBI

    Another new member

    Welcome Gary and Roy. I lived just by Trent Bridge and also went to Mundella, Roy. As denshaw mentions, I remember the tiny Fine Fare on Arkwright St/Radcliffe St corner, formerly a Marsdens I think, ben will know. I worked at the Fine Fare on Central Ave in the evenings when I was at school, be around 1970. The manager was a short red-faced old misery. The assistant manager was ok though, a bit of a laugh, tall bloke called Jim who went on to manage the Hyson Green store.
  21. TBI

    Henry Mellish

    Certainly FLY, but did you need a Grammar School place for those facets, could you ( or anyone else ) have got the same grounding for future life in a different type of school. As other have said, Grammars were there purely for promoting academic success for the brightest. As you and others have said, and rightly so, life is about making the most of things irrespective of education. I agree with that but that's not the point. It was never a level playing field. If there are 100% of children and 20% go to a Grammar, that leaves 80%. Are they all of the same level of intelligence, of course not. If for example, the lowest 50%, and that's a lot, were more fitted to senior or comprehensive schools, what about the other 30% in the middle. Nearly a third of children got lumped in with the lowest. That's got to be unfair and unequal. I was Grammar educated, have a degree, was lucky and worked very hard throughout my career to achieve success. I could be forgiven for promoting the Grammar ethos, look at me. One thing I've always done though, is look out for the underdog. It wasn't a fair system and let far too many down who could have achieved much more. I'm not trying to get on my soapbox or be provocative and I've said my bit on the subject. That's my tuppence.
  22. TBI

    Henry Mellish

    That 11+ gave me equality, academically, with other, better off kids. Certainly it did, good for you. What about the 80% or so that didn't get that opportunity? What equality did they receive? I can NEVER understand folks that believe grammars promote inequality. I don't know why you can't, it's not difficult. It's numbers game, simple and rational. What I struggle to understand is some of those on here who had the privilege of going to a Grammar School yet whinge constantly about how much they hated it. What an absolute waste of an opportunity that could have gone to a child who would have appreciated it.
  23. TBI

    Henry Mellish

    Comes back to that inequality again. Even being in the top 20% who passed the 11+, a couple of examples of lost opportunity, just because parents were too poor to afford the uniform. You can understand why the system was junked. PS Jill, I'd never heard of the 13+.
  24. TBI

    Henry Mellish

    Yes, the difference was probably the 11th plus. But what nurturing/educational development did you have prior to that, say from starting school aged five, the crucial time in a child's development. What was your home environment like, how much time did your parents spend with you? We were all 'working class' at Trent Bridge but there was a big variance in individual kids. As for the 11th plus, as I said probably because I know for a fact I never took it, so how did I end up at a Grammar school?
  25. TBI

    Henry Mellish

    Catfan is perfectly correct. It's another self-fulfilling prophesy. People usually rise to expectation, those from poor backgrounds in lower jobs, the privileged will do far better. Yes, folk can achieve with drive and determination but the odds are stacked against many from the outset.