letsavagoo

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228 Exceptional Poster of Nottstalgia

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About letsavagoo

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    Super Nottstalgian

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Notts
  • Interests
    History WW1. Computers Linux. Shortwave radio.

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  1. Hyson Green get together

    My Grandfather was killed at Bullencourt on the 21st March 1918. There is no grave although his name is on a mass memorial in Arras. When I visitted it the area was surrounded by druggies and prostitutes. A contrast to many of the war grave and memorial sites which are immaculate. That date is infamous in the history of WW1 as it was the launch of the last big German offensive designed to end the war. He was either blown to pieces or left where he fell and likely trampled into the mud. Researching and in particular transcribing the letters has been amazing and for me. Really heartbreaking and literally moving me to tears at times but I really got to know him. Words cannot do justice to the horror he and many others went through. I am totally atheist and have no pretentions that he's 'in a better place', he's not. He died cold hungry and terrified in a conflict that it's hard to imagine humans can inflict on one another. You may detect a hint of bitterness, there is but I realise given the circumstances at that time there was little alternative. I've been to Ypres and surrounding areas a few times but have only recently traced the exact location where he fell. I was planning to visit on 21st March this year, exactly 100 years since he was killed but may have to leave it for practical reasons which is a shame as I had intended doing so for quite a long time. I will visit one day though.
  2. Hyson Green get together

    Not at all md. Bring them along by all means. My grandfather was killed in 1918 and I'm here. My father was born in 1914 and didn't marry until later in life as he felt responsible for and looked after his mum who was completely and utterly shattered at the loss of her husband and never got over it. The meeting isn't exclusively about the war but a general 'can you remember' this and that etc.
  3. I have been notified of this get together which will take place at The Vine on Friday 2nd March, 10.30am for another showing of the PLU Project film and other news/events/chat opportunities. The PLU project referred to relates to Present Location Uncertain and relates to the letters my Grandfather wrote home to my Grandmother in WW1. Its a nice social gathering and worth looking in if you can. The vine is at the back of St Stephens church on Bobbers Mill Road. It is NOT a religious meeting in any way but just uses the space there.
  4. Classic Old Films On TV.

    Loneliness of the long distance runner on talking pictures today (freeview 81). Not my favourite Sillitoe film adaptation but worth a watch.
  5. Alfreton Road

    I lived in the flat above Hutchings hairdressers just after I was married 1974 for a year or so. Only one decent size bedroom but generally the flat was quite big and really very nice. Terrific spot to look out the front window after the pubs turned out and watch the entertainment. Plenty of heated arguments and the odd fight. The only drawback was Hutchings dog. They used to let it out to poo in the yard and for some reason It liked to balance itself and mess on the outside stairway. You had to watch your step and check the feet of visitors. It really was a nuisance.
  6. Classic Old Films On TV.

    There was a retune message recently on mine to do with talking pictures. As Jonab says a factory reset or retune may sort it. Be careful if you have a PVR that you don't delete any recordings you want to keep.
  7. The Hangman

    The last public hanging in Nottingham was on 10th August 1864 outside the Shirehall. I am quite familiar with this case as he murdered his parents very close to where I live. The condemned man Richard Parker's scratched his initials on the wall in the excercise yard at the Shirehall which you can still see today if you go to the galleries of justice. He was also buried beneath the yard there. A judge does an excellent talk on the murder occasionally for local history groups.
  8. Driving lessons - where and when?

    I swapped a push bike for an old NSU moped when I was about 12. A neighbour saw me and gave me an Ariel Leader motorbike he was parting with when I was 13 or 14 and I rode these around the land at the bottom of Woodstock Avenue in Radford. Never went on the road of course. I swapped it a few weeks before my 16th birthday for a Lambretta TV 175 and put in for my test. I got a cancellation so about 3 weeks after my birthday got my test. The day of my test I was at work at Raleigh in the offices and got time off to do the test. I went to the bike shed and try as I might my Lambretta refused to start. I was stuck and in desperation went to the toy manufacturing dept where a lad worked who had a scooter. I barely knew him as we started and finished at different times but he parked his scooter in the same shed as me and we sometimes said hello if he was on overtime. I asked if I could borrow his scoot and to my surprise and gratitude he said yes. The test was at West Bridgeford so I rode there a bit late and rather downhearted as the scoot I was on was tricked out, a dozen mirrors backrest etc. The full mod monty which I thought wouldn't go down very well. Anyway the examiner told me to ride down the road, turn first right and keep turning first rights until he would tell me to stop. So I set off turned right but found it wasn't a road as such but a back alley behind shops. I came out the far end turned right and found myself going towards Trent Bridge which I knew was wrong. I headed back and found the irate examiner who gave me an almighty bollocking but sent me off again. All went well and he passed me first time. Eternal gratitude to the scooter lender whoever you were.
  9. Driving lessons - where and when?

    Years ago I used to be good friends with an elderly man who had been a travelling showman. When he was a young man he took his driving test in an old diesel electric lorry that was used for transporting a ride and towing huge loads. This had a diesel powered generator which fed electric motors which actually moved it. These faded out of existence as clutch and mechanical drives improved. A similar principle to diesel electric trains. The examiner obviously didn't understand the type of vehicle he was in and at the end of the test congratulated my friend on a very smooth drive saying he never felt a gear change and gave him a licence to drive just about anything. It should have been for the specific class only.
  10. Linux

    https://blogs.skype.com/news/2017/09/29/introducing-a-preview-of-the-next-generation-of-skype-for-linux/?eu=true
  11. Linux

    I have used Linux of various 'flavours' now for some 10 years plus. It can be challenging but has got much easier recently. One of my main reasons to start using Linux was I have a few older laptops designed for Windows NT or 95 and Windoze XP was way too slow (now obsolete anyway) and they are incapable of running more recent versions of Windows which seem to need a lot of processing power and ram merely to start let alone do anything. I am now fully Windows free and I run Linux on my modern desktop and laptop too which could easily run the latest MS operating systems. I find Linux faster, more secure, less prone but not immune from viruses, it very rarely crashes, does not slow down over time and does not spy on you as MS is widely reported to do so. There are thousands of free programs available. The update process is far simpler and it's free. I accept its not for everyone and getting my scanner to work on Arch wasn't without pain but once you work out what to do it's no harder to use than Windows with brilliant online help. Unless you have some piece of software that is essential and only available in Windows, what's not to like.
  12. Available on iplayer. Today's program visited Langley Mill, Eastwood with a brief visit to Raleigh. worth a look.
  13. Is anyone still running Windoze 7?

    There are some excellent video editors available on Linux. Look at 'explaining computers' on YouTube. He did a recent roundup on the best. Learning curve for you but if you're used to editors I'm sure you'd manage.
  14. Anti virus etc..

    I use either my iPad or a laptop that runs Linux. I have little use for antivirus. However I am involved with Microsoft products and believe the best antivirus protection is provided by Eset. You have to pay for it though and there are some decent free options but I find eset does not slow down the machine like some others do. Remember though that because your virus protection says you don't have a virus doesn't mean you don't have one, it means it hasn't detected one.
  15. fox and grapes pub

    I've read about this previously. Radford Red is on the money. It had stained glass and intricate designed windows hence the nick name. It is not Ge Off's smashed window story. This is on the BBC crime watch site quote The father-of-two was killed as he left the pub, well-known for the intricate design of its windows, to take the family dog for a walk shortly after midnight. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-24600834