Robbie

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Robbie last won the day on October 7 2015

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20 Excellent Nottstalgia Content

About Robbie

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    GIGA NOTTSTALGIAN

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    Nottingham

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  1. Cliff Ton, Until you started your Nottingham From Above thread I didn’t realise the Britain from Above website existed but then again I never heard of Picture the Past until you uploaded photographs of Nottingham. I am totally hooked on both sites and now wading through the Britain from Above site, although I doubt I will view the 15,000 photos taken between 1919 and 1953 butI will certainly have ago as both sites are very useful for my research. I appreciate all your time and effort you have put into your thread, sourcing these brilliant photographs for all to enjoy. Your efforts have certainly saved me a lot of time so thank you and keep up the good work.
  2. I have just received a time lapse MP4 video (.mp4) but it is 65mb, which I viewed in windows media player. I found it very interesting and tried uploading, but no luck. Maybe its not possible to do this in this format and size. Can anyone help or advise.?
  3. #10 Thanks for that Mick, you know how to make someone feel special. Do I get a membership card like Carni's?
  4. Reading your post #1 Bennerley, btw welcome, you mention a Paul Russell. Is this the same person I use to work with back in the 80/90's? He certainly was into jazz and I think played drums. Not too tall, dark hair with swarthy skin, to me he looked very typical of a jazz musician, probably because of his dress code. He was also an Architect. Just curious.
  5. I really do envy you lot for being part of a gang as kids. Unfortunately I never had that luxury, by the time I was eleven I had already lived on three council estates, Bilborough, Clifton and Bestwood Park. Each moved involved a new school often starting mid-term which meant new friendships had already been made and old ones maintained. I was always left on the outside or that’s how I felt. Always picked last for anything at school and sometimes left out totally. When Carni writes about her and SueB48 what they got up to, or Firbeck and his bunch, and others on this site I realise just how much I have missed out during my youth. I’m not bitter just envious and l do enjoy reading what you lot did as youngsters and can only imagine what it would have been like for me. It wasn’t until seniors, college and work that I eventually formed lasting group friendships. I now have a small circle of good reliable friends but what I would have given to have been a member of a gang.
  6. I agree Col, a brilliant, unforgettable voice but not a Motown artist, as well you know.
  7. #31 NewBasfordlad, you are correct but this is worth a read. You need a general licence or other authorised person to catch alive or kill wild birds to preserve public health or public safety (licence GL05). If you’re a land owner, occupier or other authorised person you can use this general licence to carry out a range of otherwise prohibited activities against certain wild birds. You don’t need to apply for this general licence but you must meet its conditions and follow its instructions. You are an authorised person if you’re one of the following: • the land owner, occupier or anyone authorised by the owner or occupier • authorised in writing by the local authority • authorised in writing by any England, Scotland or Wales conservation body, a district board for fisheries or local fisheries committee • authorised in writing by the Environment Agency, a water undertaker or a sewerage undertaker You can only use this licence to preserve public health or public safety. You can’t use this licence to kill birds because they are damaging your property, such as your car or house, or if they’re a nuisance. With this licence you can catch alive or kill • crows • collared doves • jackdaws • jays • lesser black-backed gulls • magpies • pigeons (feral and woodpigeon) • rooks
  8. #18 It’s not just magpies and jackdaws that are protected all wild birds including their nests and eggs are protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 in England. Licences can be applied for to kill or take away any wildlife if certain criteria are met. Just like man has contributed to the falling numbers of hedgehogs man has contributed to the increase of the population of the magpie. More cars on the roads results in more wildlife casualties. Nothing better than a dead fox or badger for a magpie to feast on, they are scavengers by nature . Maybe we should give up our cars….I doubt that will happen. I have got magpies in my garden and I agree they are bullies chasing off the smaller birds at feeding time but it’s all down to the pecking order and there is no bird more intelligent than the magpie.
  9. Robbie

    Colin Welland

    #5 At our age Trevor that's a sobering thought
  10. Trevor, photograph is one of six taken by my late father in law back in 1959. This is purely guess work but the houses in the background could be the back of Sidney Grove and the builders yard where the lads are collecting the timber is now the funeral directors/parlour premises. I will upload the others if you are interested. BTW. Have you any particular interest in this photograph?
  11. Robbie

    Tom Graveney

    A great cricketer, brilliant batsman and a Geordie lad as well. As a schoolboy I was a keen cricketer myself and admired Tom for his batting skills and Wes Hall (Windies) for his bowling. RIP Tom
  12. I know you do FLY, I have read your posts on birds in your garden, the feathered type, you are one of many who do care about our wildlife but unfortunately there are people out there who don't care a toss.
  13. #1 I agree in what you say Mick but you should always check before you light a garden fire anyway, no matter what time of year, you never know what could be nesting or if the neighbours have their washing hanging out. One of the biggest culprits contributed to the fall in the number of hedgehogs is us humans occupying more of the countryside with new roads, estates, garden walls preventing freedom of movement, more motorists, the increase of the badger and fox population and gardeners who still use slug pellets and other poisons. I too live in the countryside and encourage and protect wildlife in my garden but I also light fires and will be lighting one on the 5th.....but will check first
  14. Thanks Cliff Ton, to the rescue yet again. It must be about six pints I owe you now. I will enjoy reading those posts.