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He played a buffoon...a role for which he seemed ideally suited.

About as funny as woodworm in a cripples' stick....prime time TV too! !sleeping!

Made the Chuckle Brothers seem hilarious.

Cheers

Robt P.

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I can remember seeing him, but being very young. The only thing I can remember fom his show is the beginning with the window, and the words "My name is Harry Worth, I don't know why".

To the contrary, I can remember bits of Charley Drake (hate him!), Arthur Haynes, The Army Game, Bootsie & Snudge, Citizen Smith, Hugh & I, and of course lots of Handcock.

Steptoe I discount memory wise because its never been off the telly?

Anyone remember those or any others?

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Some I remember:

George & the Dragon - Hugh Lloyd & Peggy Mount

Never Mind the Quality Feel the Width - John Bluthal (Vicar of Dibley) & Joe Lynch

Me Mammy - Milo O'Shea & Yootha Joyce

Queenie's Castle - Diana Dors & "Arfur" Mullard

Nearest & Dearest - Hylda Baker & Jimmy Jewell

From a Birds Eye View - Millicent Martin & Stephen Jones

The Likely Lads - James Bolam etc

The Liver Birds - Nerys Hughes & Polly James

Sykes - can't remember who this one starred!! :rolleyes:

Please Sir - John Alderton

Does anybody remember the one with Eric Sykes & Spike Milligan where Spike played an Indian that introduced the saying "big bristol rovers" when talking about a well endowed lady?

B)

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That was the one! Here's a resume..

Written by Johnny Speight in the midst of the BBC's Till Death Us Do Part this equally controversial, chaotic and memorable sitcom - ironically, LWT's first in colour - was short-lived. It had to be, such was the high feeling it stirred up, although Speight's undoubted intention, as with Till Death, was to highlight discrimination, not fuel it.Set in the staff canteen and on the factory floor at Lillicrap Ltd, makers of seaside novelties, Curry And Chips starred a blacked-up Spike Milligan as 'Paki Paddy' Kevin O'Grady, who claimed to be Irish on his father's side; Eric Sykes, as the liberal-minded factory foreman often springing to the defence of the much-maligned O'Grady; Sam Kydd as the malodorous Smellie; Norman Rossington and Geoffrey Hughes as racist white Liverpudlians; and singer/actor Kenny Lynch as a black anti-Pakistani. In addition to the liberal slinging about of racist terms there was a good deal of (mostly harmless) swearing, one viewer noting that the word 'bloody' was said 59 times in a single episode. (Only Eric Sykes didn't swear - he refused to do so.)

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"Sykes was involved in a number of projects, including the now controversial Curry and Chips opposite a blacked-up Spike Milligan."

Spike left us with the best ever gravestone inscription, which was requested in his Will.

"I TOLD YOU I WAS ILL......"

Cheers

Robt P.

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Further research shows...

Milligan gets last laugh on grave

Spike Milligan decided on his epitaph before he died in 2002

Comedy legend Spike Milligan has finally got the last laugh, more than two years after his death.

It follows an agreement with the local diocese over the wording on the headstone of his grave at St Thomas's Church in Winchelsea, East Sussex.

Relatives of the former Goon have now decided that it can bear the star's epitaph: "I told you I was ill." However, the inscription had to be written in Gaelic in order for it to be approved by the Chichester Diocese.

Milligan, who was an Irish passport holder, was buried close to his home in Udimore after he died, aged 83, from liver failure in February 2002.

But fans visiting his grave found it was only marked by some plants and a small statue because his family had been unable to agree on the headstone.

We're very pleased it's been resolved and with such a classic Spike line

Bill Horsman, of the Goon Show Preservation Society

It now bears the words "Duirt me leat go raibh me breoite", or "I told you I was ill", and the English words "Love, light, peace". Bill Horsman, chairman of the Goon Show Preservation Society, said: "News of the headstone going up on Spike's grave is marvellous.

"We had been very concerned for some time about the situation.

"It was very sad that the grave was in such a state, but it was down to very sensitive family problems and we simply could not get involved.

"We're very pleased it's been resolved and with such a classic Spike line.

"We all fell about laughing when we heard it."

Milligan formed the Goons with Peter Sellers, Harry Secombe and Michael Bentine and was widely regarded as one of the greatest influences on British comedy.

Milligan gets last laugh on grave - BBC News

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  • 14 years later...
On 3/29/2006 at 12:52 PM, farenuf said:

Jimmy Jewell

 

You don’t say?

 

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  • 1 month later...

Is that bus a 39 going to Carlton Square of a 45 on its way to Trent Bridge?

 

 

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micktome   

 

sould  this post not  say "Who is this person"?

 

Can any one remember 

""The Rag Trade"?                       

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A few more

The Army Game

Best one yet Dixon of Dock-Green

Emergency Ward 10

Brookside

Billy Bunter

Armchair Theatre only on for half an hour but all ways a good story.

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  • 1 month later...
On 5/1/2021 at 11:35 PM, mary1947 said:

micktome   

 

sould  this post not  say "Who is this person"?

 

Can any one remember 

""The Rag Trade"?                       

The Rag Trade where the shop steward woman Miriam Karlin used to blow the whistle and shout 'Everybody out',  Also stared Sheila Hancock, Peter Jones and Reg Varney?  No never erd of it!  Ha ha.  Yes I remember it from my youth, my mother was a seamstress, used to work in Griffin's (and Spalding) alterations department for many years so had a great interest in the program I suppose.  She can, and still does, tell a tale or two about those days with all the posh Nottingham shoppers in what was known as 'The expensive department'.  Says her knees used to tremble whenever she was called down to the showroom floor to take measurements.  Was told only to speak when spoken unless to do with the measuring; no small chit chat with the customer allowed under any circumstances.  Not like they'd have spoken to her in those days of course ;-) 

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I remember the Rag Trade, mainly from watching it with my Mum as she was a hand finisher for Ladies coats for a company in the Lace Market. She originally did an apprenticeship at Burberrys in Basingstoke.

 

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

I remember it too.  Didn't like it much as I never rated Reg Varney.

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