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letsavagoo

Translate this French for me please

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Is there a French speaker who can look at this and translate what the hand written notes say at the bottom of this form please. It’s here post 44. It’s only a few words.

 

https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/67584-soldiers-memoirs-26-south-staffordshire-regt/page/2/

 

Thanks

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1.10.18 Euguet Balin (person's name) +age(?)

1.10.18 a.n. fam (family)

   ? Balin Recherche n'est pas abouti (Balin the search is not successful)

18 XI 18 Communiqué famille (Letter to the family)

 

Does this help?

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Thank you Jonab. 
Yes it does. My grandfather was killed in March 1918 in WW1. This was a particularly chaotic time with a huge German push (the spring offensive). In a massive attack his battalion all but wiped out no there was one to say what happened to him. My grandmother was distraught and hoping he had been taken prisoner. I believe this card relates to her enquiry as to his whereabouts. it was quite a long time, many months before he was officially recognised as lost presumed dead.

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As we approach Anzac Day the day when Australia remembers those that made the supreme sacrifice the phrases that often appear on war memorials are the most haunting for me.

"No Known Grave"

"An Australian Soldier of the Great War … Known unto God"

I just cannot imagine the absolute grief of those left behind not knowing where their loved ones lie. 

 

It will be a very strange Anzac Day this year with all public attendances at commemorative services banned due to Covid 19

There is a groundswell of community activity for us all to go outside our homes with a torch or candle at 5:55 am, dawn, on Anzac Day and pay our respects.

 

Lest we Forget

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Find it difficult to read such as the above,,........All so very young....

                    ..........

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Obviously, I never knew great uncle Jack but his photograph was always around from as early as I can remember. He very much resembled George Ward, my relative at Garden Street, who was his cousin and knew him well. They joined the Sherwood Foresters together. Jack was killed in March 1918 and George was taken prisoner at around the same time having just returned to the front from leave, during which he married Emily at Lambley Parish church.

 

George often recalled his friendship with Jack and, for that reason, I have always felt a strong affinity with the great uncle I never met.

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Jonab - isn't the first word Enquete (don't know how to do the accent on a keyboard!) rather than Euguet?  Not that  it really matters!

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You are probably right, annswabey. I was somewhat misled as I know someone with a very similar name to Euguet.

 

Enquet means investigation - which fits spot-on with the gist of message.

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Jill.

Regarding  your great uncle Jack. What was a jacker off!

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Wish I knew! I've often tried to find out but to no avail. He worked at a Dyers and Finishers in Basford. Whether that would have been Saxby's I don't know. The term may be related to that trade.

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It's not this is it?

JAGGER  -  A carrier, carter, pedlar or hawker of fish; 19th century, young boy in charge of 'jags'or train of trucks in coal mine.

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Jagger and Jacker may be related, ie derived from the same root, but precisely what his role was within the dyeing and finishing works I don't know. Perhaps someone with a knowledge of that industry could clarify.

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I have a brief knowledge of the trade from accountancy clients many years ago. Springfield Hosiery and Wrights and Dobsons. I think it was to do with a jacking machine that stacked up the fabric into piles.

 

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I don’t want to be disrespectful to your relative Jill or inappropriate but I worked (professionally) for 7 years with street prostitutes and when I read the occupation as ‘jacker off’ I spat my tea out.

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Thanks for that, David! I've always wondered.  The only other thing I know about Jack is that he was mad keen on football.

 

By the way, I'm so glad you said (professionally) ;)

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Talking of jackering off, one of the jobs at Gerards Soap Works was the Blower Man. One day, a tannoy announcement was made  to the whole site: "Will the Blow Job man please ring - - - "

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I love those calls to Mo’s bar in the Simpsons. “Somebody on the line for Yuri Nator. Is there a Yuri Nator in here?”

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