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Just finished making a new drink bottle bracket for the trike, the original one was on the main frame tube but facing forward,I wanted the bottle to face backwards so I can reach the bottle while riding,the original way was to stop riding,put on the park brake,get off the trike and get the bottle that way,with the new bracket all I have to do is reach forward and get the bottle,much easier (or more lazy) anyway, flat aluminium 15mm wide,3mm thick bent in the right places to match the frame and the bottle cage,drilled with 5mm drill bit and fitted, enjoyed doing that and it looks good

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You can see the new bracket under the bottle, the flat aluminium triangular bracket

 

Rog

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Den,It's gone a bit quiet on the cycling front,are you still riding?

 

Rog

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You can get snow tyres mate, No I don't mean made of snow  :crazy: they have small metal studs set in them,

Keep pedaling

 

Rog

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Just caught up reading this thread, very interesting Rog, looking at the pics, i see there is a fair bit of chain from the pedals to the rear , how is it tensioned or does it just rely on the deralieur "sp" gear ?

Also I see the chain runs inside some tubes under the seat, obviously to stop chaffing your legs whilst pedaling. Be a bugger to get  anew chain through them I would think.

 

Keep the pics coming, some nice green scenery around that area, miss that living here in Oz, we get green in winter but nothing like the rich green english countryside.

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Hi Banjo, the chain is the same length as three ordinary bike chains,if you need to change it you split the old one and join the new one to it and pull the chain through the tubes, if the chain snaps on you you just feed the new chain through the tubes and clip the end of the chain using an "R" clip, then feed the other end of the chain through the other tube leaving enough slack to thread the chain around the rear mech, there is an idler pulley about midway along the frame for the returning side of the chain because thats the one under tension when pedaling the bottom of the chain just relies on the rear mech for tension although the PTFE chain tubes do help with that,I'll get a couple of pictures in a bit when I get the trike out of the bike shed,thanks for showing interest,recumbent bikes and trikes are very popular on the continent especially Holland and Germany, there is a company in Holland that has started making a four wheeled fully enclosed version called a Quattrovelo, checkout the websites for Sinna mango or for the same trike as mine ICE trikes, all technical data and video's are on the sites

 

Rog

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Banjo,picures of the chain idler under the seat

 

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The idler wheel is fixed in a small frame and the chain tubes are fixed in that,so far along the rear triangle there is a fabric hanger which the bottom chain tube is suspended

 

Rog

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Like Banjo I too wondered about tension and expected to see a sprung idler somewhere but I can those tubes will prevent any whip in the slack side. The idler you show us takes care of the change in direction, how about a nice pic of the gear set?

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You don't need the chain tubes as another idler can be fitted somewhere along the chain stay, on the ICE Vortex recumbent trike there is an extra idler fitted instead of the tubes, the latest ICE trikes to come out have all wheel suspension and are capable of being "folded" ( check the ICE website for a video of that in action) Here is the pictures you wanted of the gearset, it's a SRAM X9 nine speed rear block, 11-36 and a TRUVATIVE front end three ring 48-36-26 which give a good range for general road work, the latest trikes have a 10 speed where mine is the 9 speed,but in saying that just riding around the lanes of Lincolnshire I probably only use about 5 of the rear gears and just stay in the middle ring up front

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Hope you understand my ramblings

 

Rog

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Very simple setup Mick, must be for me to understand it

 

Rog

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Blimey, it looks something akin to stuff out of the Transformers films !

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When I first got the trike I wanted to assemble it myself so all the parts arrived in a big box with all the smaller parts in poly bags, took about 6 hours to assemble and about an hour to get all the gears, brakes and steering set up and about a thousand miles (not all in one go) to get my leg muscles used to a new way of pedaling, I got it in 2009 and done many thousands of miles, a lot of them for charity ,done the Notts bike ride collecting money for "Headway" took it upto the Derwent dam Derbyshire (on the back of a truck) and rode around the dams up there,loads of laps around Draycote water near Rugby,Rutland water loads of times,Leicester Sky ride,( took it to those places on a truck) been to Lincoln,Newark,Grantham, Lowdham, Gainsborough, It's good fun and with a bit of luck might help to keep me a bit fit

 

Rog

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Excellent pics, thanks. I'm surprised at the size of the rear disc brake for such a small contact patch.

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It's 160mm, only use it as a parking brake and sometimes as a slow me down brake if going down steep hills like Beacon hill in Newark or Canwick hill in Lincoln

 

Rog

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Sorry to hi-jack this thread slightly but how do you determine what size frame you need? looking for a 'normal' bike with two wheels and pedals that you use to get from A to B.  One like this perhaps but not for that amount of money: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Retro-Raleigh-Esquire-Men-s-Bicycle-Vintage-3-Speed-Orange-Bike/142550613304?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649

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Inside leg measurement plays a part, sit on the seat and you should be able to put the ball of your foot on the ground, then theres the reach,top tube length, handlebar height , it's a bit of a science really,there is a website called "sheldon brown" all sorts of info on there about sizing etc, or talk to your nearest independent bike shop, (not Halfords they just want to sell you a bike, an independent will want you to enjoy riding a bike)the one you are looking at on ebay looks to be about a 24 inch, suitable for someone around the 6ft-6and half foot,  hope this helps

 

Rog

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21 inch wouldn't be too far off for you,don't forget you have about 6 inches of seat pin you could extend as well and about2-3 inches of handlebar stem should you need it, nip down to halfords and have a sneeky sit on one of their bikes but make it clear you don't want to buy,just looking, at least it will give you a rough idea and cost you nowt

 

Rog

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Mountain bike wheels are usually 26" and road bike (racing bike) and Hybrid bikes  (cross between mountain bike and road bike) are usually 700c size which is slightly bigger then the 27", then there is the new breed of bikes to come out recently and they are 29" wheels and some off road stuff now come in with 26" x 4" wide called FAT tyres for obvious reasons, The front wheels on my trike are 20" with a 26" rear wheel, now you are completely confused

 

Rog

 

Was you asking for a specific reason Den?

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Less rolling resistance, easier to turn. Den if your bike has them "montain bike" tyres on you know the knobbly ones, take them off and put some smooth road tyres on such as "City Sicks" or similar at 26"x1.5",(assuming yours are 26" of course) a lot less rolling resistance and a heck of a lot easier to pedal round,why do you want knobbly off road tyres for riding on the road?

 

Rog

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