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Nut Yard - Bobbers Mill & Whitemoor

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Thomas Hardy is one of my favourite fiction authors. Far from the Madding Crowd being my favourite work of his but as it happens I'm currently listening to the Mayor of Casterbridge on iplayer radio. I've read it but a long time ago and can't recall the incident you refer to Jill. It will take me months to listen to it all as I fall asleep after 10 minutes then it takes be ages to find where I was up to the following night. I've got a jam jar full of old coins with some foreign ones in too. I threw my 'once' penny in there and it's been there ever since. Wonder if it once covered a corpse eye and who lost it 200 years or so before I found it. 

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The pennies were used in the novel to cover the eyes of Susan Henchard after her death.  Perhaps, if you had dug around a bit at the time you may have found others and they might well have been used for the same purpose, then buried in the field. 

 

This is the extract from the novel

 

And she was white as marble-stone," said Mrs. Cuxsom. "And likewise such a thoughtful woman, too — ah, poor soul — that a' minded every little thing that wanted tending. 'Yes,' says she, 'when I'm gone, and my last breath's blowed, look in the top drawer o' the chest in the back room by the window, and you'll find all my coffin clothes, a piece of flannel — that's to put under me, and the little piece is to put under my head; and my new stockings for my feet — they are folded alongside, and all my other things. And there's four ounce pennies, the heaviest I could find, a-tied up in bits of linen, for weights — two for my right eye and two for my left,' she said. 'And when you've used 'em, and my eyes don't open no more, bury the pennies, good souls and don't ye go spending 'em, for I shouldn't like it. And open the windows as soon as I am carried out, and make it as cheerful as you can for Elizabeth-Jane.'"

"Ah, poor heart!"

"Well, and Martha did it, and buried the ounce pennies in the garden. But if ye'll believe words, that man, Christopher Coney, went and dug 'em up, and spent 'em at the Three Mariners. 'Faith,' he said, 'why should death rob life o' fourpence? Death's not of such good report that we should respect 'en to that extent,' says he."

"'Twas a cannibal deed!" deprecated her listeners.

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2 hours ago, MargieH said:

The pennies were also supposed to 'pay the ferry man' who would row them across the river Styx to Hades.

 

Is that near Compo, up at Caithness Margie ??

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19 hours ago, letsavagoo said:

I used to play football for Berridge school on this field. It was always referred to as Nuthall Road playing field (1960-66). I found one of the thick heavy very old pennies on the field when it was muddy and churned up with our boots. I got tackled and fell over and it was just lying there. I still have it. You can't make out the date it's so worn but I think it's 17??.

 

I did play football on what must have been the same ground. I always recall it as being Whitemoor. 

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I think it must be the same field MD. I would think the name it was know as changed which is why I dated my time there. Perhaps Nuthall Road was just a name we used and not the official name.

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On ‎6‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 9:20 PM, MargieH said:

@C B Hunt... if you want to reply to a specific message, press 'Quote' and it will appear in the reply box.  Then you can type your reply underneath it

Many thanks Margie.  I had tried a few things but couldn't work it out.  That's great.  CB

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I have been investigating family history on the Notts/Derby border and there is an area of Belper called 'Whitemoor' (previously a hamlet) linked to the pottery.

 

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On ‎7‎/‎1‎/‎2019 at 10:32 PM, Willow wilson said:

Thanks for researching that Cliff Ton. This one, next to the pub and near the shops and bus stops, post office etc certainly would carry a greater familiarity post-war than the other one and maybe prone to wrong identification.

It's the Whitemoor mystery.

Also, on the modern map there is a 'Lodge Close' right next to the Whitemoor pub - so somebody certainly thought that the Lodge was around that area!!

 

 

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Hi Alpha,

               You mentioned "Robin Soar" in an earlier post. Robin and I where mates in the early 50.s before my family emigrated to Australia in 1956. Lost contact all those years ago. His dad was a coal miner and they lived in Cyril Ave. My Dad ran the shop next to the Post Office, did fish and chips and groceries later. Do you know of Robin,s whereabouts? Probably a long shot but someone may know.

                                  Regards Keith

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Hi kj792 From you interests I'd guess that you are in either NSW or Qld but it doesn't really matter, another Nottstalgian in Oz to add to the gang downunder. Welcome

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10 hours ago, kj792 said:

Hi Alpha,

               You mentioned "Robin Soar" in an earlier post. Robin and I where mates in the early 50.s before my family emigrated to Australia in 1956. Lost contact all those years ago. His dad was a coal miner and they lived in Cyril Ave. My Dad ran the shop next to the Post Office, did fish and chips and groceries later. Do you know of Robin,s whereabouts? Probably a long shot but someone may know.

                                  Regards Keith

Hi! kj792

I am afraid I have no information on Robin only that I knew him as working for a pork butchers, who's name I forget, at the bottom of Denehurst Avenue.

The only acquaintances' I am able to recall Bobber's Mill are Alan Hambleton, Mary Brown and Adele Jackson who lived further up Nuthall Road at the corner of Whitemoor Avenue.

I wished to emigrate to Ozz in 1962 with two friends if mine, unfortunately my mother intercepted my applications which sadly I failed to follow up. An opportunity lost forever as I joined the Marines instead.

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Hi OZTALGIAN,

                          I live on the Mid North Coast of NSW just out of Forster 4 hours by road to Sydney. We built here 2003 on a golf course estate,still playing golf but as we get older the game becomes a "mystery".

                                

Can you recall what year you new of Robin,I would imagine he would still live in the area,maybe listed in the local phone book.

                                                    Regards Keith 

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According to 192.com there are 2 Robin Soars in the UK. 1 in Peterborough and the other in Bexley, Kent. 

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There's a Robin A Soar, born Nottingham in 1941. Married Madeleine B Dewhurst in Grimsby in 1962. No record of a death that I can see unless it's quite recent.

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The Robin A Soar who married Madeleine  B Dewhurst in 1962 (found by Jill) emigrated to New Zealand in 1967 with his wife and 2 children. He was naturalised in New Zealand in 1977, date of birth given as 1 Feb 1941 and birthplace as Attenborough, England. Unfortunately he appears to have died  in Auckland in 1999

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Hi All 

          I thank you for your information. I was born in 1942 and I believe I was 1 year older than Robin,he was a good swimmer and may have furthered in that sport? 

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12 hours ago, kj792 said:

Hi Alpha,

                  Can you recall what year you new of Robin,I would imagine he would still live in the area,maybe listed in the local phone book.

                                                    Regards Keith 

Keith,

I last saw Robin in about 1960.

 

Regards,

 

A.

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Just to provide some clarification on my original query (I've just visited Nottingham and done some more research). 

 

Whitemoor Crossing is the same place as Bobbers Mill Crossing.  Although the death certificate and the coroner's report in the newspaper refer to Whitemoor Crossing, the probate report refers to his death being at Bobbers Mill.  We went and left a few flowers there in his memory.  There were at least two deaths reported at the crossing in 1909, that may well be the reason that the footbridge was installed and perhaps Bobbers Mill road bridge?  Thanks to everyone for their help with this, particularly the old photo and maps. 

 

Incidentally, there seemed to be a wheatsheaf engraved on the front of the McDonalds building by Bobbers Mill.  Is that the same building as was previously the Wheatsheaf pub or is it a new building?

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It was formerly The Wheatsheaf pub and, from what I saw earlier this year, parts of the stonework have been incorporated into a new building. As ever, with me, preferred the original.

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The signal box in the photograph is a Midland Railway design.

I think it is Babbington Crossing.

By taking the line to Trowell from Radford Junction, you would have crossed a colliery line that carried coal to a wharf on Nottingham Canal, where it was loaded onto barges.

Adjacent to this line stood a signal box on the right as you headed towards Trowell.

I think this is the signal box in the photograph, which would have been taken shortly before closure of the box.

As the sun is casting a shadow on the signal box from the telegraph pole, if I am right about the location, then it looks as if the photograph was taken early morning.

One signalman taking a photograph of his colleague at shift changeover?

A memento of their time together before their departures to another location?

This rural setting would quickly disappear.

Western Boulevard being built on the old colliery track bed with the signal box standing somewhere under the Northern end of the bridge.

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41 minutes ago, Dark Angel said:

The signal box in the photograph is a Midland Railway design.   I think it is Babbington Crossing.

 

Welcome to Nottstalgia Dark Angel.  i assume you're referring to the photo earlier in this thread posted by DJ360 on July 8th 2016.     

 

https://nottstalgia.com/forums/topic/15163-nut-yard-bobbers-mill-whitemoor/?page=2

 

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Welcome to Nottstalgia from me too Dark Angel.

 

Many thanks for the information you've posted.  To be honest, I can't visualise where you think the crossing was and what is there now.  Could you give any more pointers?

 

Thanks again.

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Looking again at Dark Angel's post, it all makes sense. This is the area described.

v1TK1og.jpg

The Signal Box in the photo is marked. The roads in the top left in 'Radford Woodhouse' were the area behind Crown Island; the Crown Hotel would be further down the map; the 'Mineral Railway' is now the line of Western Boulevard. The Signal Box would have been level with where Western Blvd crosses the railway today.

 

 

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The Crown would be well off the bottom of the map. Vane Street is well down Radford Bridge Road. My Fathers birthplace 2 Radford Bridge Road was directly opposite the lock at the top end of Radford Bridge Road and was demolished to build the Crown. The Nottingham Canal (if that is what it is)  is only just on the bottom left corner of the map.

 

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