Oztalgian

What are you listening to now ??

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When I bought the bagpipes the music shop gave me a jar of brown gooey looking substance with which I was supposed to lubricate the inside of the bag to stop it leaking air. I don't know what happened to it - my wife might have spread it on my toast. They sit forlornly on the shelf in what we call the 'music room' simply because all the unused instruments seem to congregate there. Since compiling my earlier inventory I have now found a violin. I just hope no visitor ask for a recital. The last time I heard the bagpipes live was on the quayside at Oban. I asked the piper if he could play 'Far, Far Away'. Sadly he had no sense of humour as he told me to eff off.

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When I was teaching, we had a peripatetic violin teacher who visited to give lessons as an extra.  One boy told me his father used to offer him £25 not to practise at home!

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5 hours ago, Mess said:

Yes Brew, it was at The Newport Folk Festival in July 1965 when Dylan went electric much to the consternation of his “folky” followers. Only one month before this The Byrd’s released Mr Tambourine Man to great acclaim and Folk Rock as it became known was born.

With regards to learning to play a musical instrument. The comb and tissue paper is a good starting point. Izal was rubbish toilet paper but it did produce some decent music lol.

It doesn't get much better than this.

What a lineup what a song.

 

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Always liked Back Pages & Baby Blue over Tambourine Man, always thought a fine body of work, The Byrds produced, albeit, lot's of covers and Trad' derivatives, the Crosby composition's for me were the best (one of my favorite

vocalist's).

Most probably already know, the story goes that only Clarke and McGuinn were deemed fit to record Tamborine Man, wrecking crew took the roles, Leon Russell, Hal Blaine Etc.

Maybe Crosby had a mood...or the band weren't yet fully formed...they were their for track two!

Went to see them at the Royal Centre...one original, Michael Clarke...The Drummer!

Think listed ads The New Byrds..Maybe an early precursor for the tribute band..

Seen McGuinn a few times locally to me, also played Newark a couple of times about 8 years ago.

 

 

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Oldie but goodie..

What's the difference between a U.S.A. Strat' and a Mexican Strat?:mellow:

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I didn’t know that story HSR.

I know McGuinn started out as a banjo player and used finger picks on a lot of his guitar tracks with The Byrds. I also know he was wowed by the sound of George Harrison's 360/12 Rickenbacker on A Hard Days Night so he went out a bought one for himself. He also got Crosby to use a Gretsch and Michael Clarke to use Ludwig drums to try and emulate the sound of The Beatles. He didn't completely succeed but finished up with very impressive sound of his own.

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10 minutes ago, HSR said:

Oldie but goodie..

What's the difference between a U.S.A. Strat' and a Mexican Strat?:mellow:

Serious answer is price/wood/ number of frets. But I guess there's a joke coming up which I haven't heard so please put me out my misery and hit me with the punchline.

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About 60 miles! ;)...

 

 

 

.

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On 9/14/2020 at 6:11 PM, Brew said:

Dylan was de rigeur in the 60's when we got pissed and contemplated our navels... a lot! 

 

I've never allowed my musical taste to be dictated by fashion.  Obviously I first became aware of Dylan because he was 'fashionable'. but I stuck with him because I liked his music.

Same goes for many others.

Conversely.. although I thought Zeppelin's first album was a revelation.. (in terms of production etc..) I soon got bored with their... and many other bands' regurgitation of the same old shite Ad Nauseam.

I've always been more interested in the evolution of popular music since say... the 1930s.

Also.. I've always liked certain classical/opera/folk/jazz/'World' etc.,etc. I just don't let my music taste be bounded by sad notions of what is 'cool', 'trendy' etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Music doesn't have a 'Sell By' date..........  :)

 

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Not a dedicated follower of Fashion'''' Col  ?

               To me whilst not following all the different shades of fashion,,,Music..Dance....... Fashion always made for the moment,,In my minds eye,,whatever music i'm listening to i visualize the clothes we were wearing.....from Elvis and Drainpipes to the Beatles Collarless Jackets and Winkle Pickers''.................Collars up ''a la Billy Fury'' to no ''Collars''of many.......all added to the great memories and Joy of our musical Magic years...........

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Been following all things American on different u tube channels.........and obviously Music plays in a big part in all our lives,,,and last couple of days have been listening to ''''Blue Grass Music''' which i enjoy when in the mood....

                          It originates in the Appalachian mountains,,,love the Banjo's and the Dancing,,,all makes you think about the ''Hillbillies'' and the film 'Deliverance'' which i always enjoy,,,if you enjoy too Col. stick some on here please,,,

                      I even purchased some actual '''Blue Grass'' plants,,which blend in well with the plants i have Potted this year,,,, '''ye igh folks''

                  How would you dress for Dancing to 'Blue Grass''..........gud ol boys?

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14 minutes ago, benjamin1945 said:

  How would you dress for Dancing to 'Blue Grass''..........gud ol boys?

 

Has to be bib'n'brace overalls, check shirts and boots, sorry Ben no neckties

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Saw Dylan at the Arena a few years ago. Warned the missus that it wouldn’t be “Mr Tambourine Man” and “Like a Rolling Stone” and that we might be leaving in the interval. Thoroughly enjoyed it! Good stage set as well. All honey light and an old time saloon feel.

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@ Ben,

I like a bit of Bluegrass too.. although it seems that the supposed 'originator' Bill Monro was a bit of a musical fascist and a misogynist.

 

I especially like the true Appallachian mountain stuff, which I'm sure pre-dates Monro and Co.  There's a brief shot in deliverance of a band playing outside a building.. don't recall what sort of building. What I especially like is they are using a 'Hammered Dulcimer'. which is sort of like a zither. but with the strings struck with little hammers. Different to the other type of Dulcimer which is a three stringed instrment usually laid across the knee and plucked.  The lovely Joni Mitchell plays one on her classic album 'Blue'.

 

I'll see what I can find.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8nnPrGSUBs

 

Start the above from about 2m30s.

 

Bill Monroe, playing the classic Gibson F4 Mandolin.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeZPAQRl7TA

 

For some reason Youtube isn't cooperating today.

 

 

 

 

 

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Ben, think I've posted this before 

check out David Hoffman's videos on YT.

 

Edit, you'll have to search hard on that site for bluegrass music but its there somewhere.

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Brilliant Will,,,...........think i'll just 'Mosey' on over...and get in line Dude''......

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Last time I heard the bagpipes was at the highland games in Atlanta.  More Scotsmen there than you might think.  They all come out of the woodwork each fall to toss poles around and dance on swords etc.  There are at least two good pipe bands as far as I know.

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There used to be an expression used to indicate when somewhere was very quiet. ‘It’s like Aberdeen on a flag day’. I’ve not heard it said for many years.  My mother said it in front of my father’s Scottish brother in law and he was not best pleased!

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And while we're at it.  Don't call a Kilt a skirt to a Scotsman.  They don't like it.

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The very first time I went to Scotland was to an audit client back in the early 60's. I caught the overnight sleeper train to Edinburgh at around 11pm. from Victoria Station. Just as I managed to get to sleep they shunted it around in York. It then stopped in Galashiels at around 6am. where I looked out of the window to see a man in a kilt, so I knew we'd crossed the border. Breakfast consisted of a cup of tea and a digestive biscuit. The next stop was Edinburgh where I changed trains for the onward journey to Perth. It arrived at a civilised breakfast hour and I checked in at the North British hotel and  had a full Scottish breakfast. I was collected by someone from the client's factory and did a day's work after meeting the company secretary who was in his office steaming the unfranked stamps off the envelopes from the day's post. This was Scotland remember! In the evening, after I had eaten at the hotel, I met up with a member of the firm's staff for a drink. He proceeded to try and drink me under the table so I had to keep my end up for England. Fortunately back then the bars closed dead on 10pm and a shutter was brought down. The evening drinking sessions went on for the rest of the week; beers with whisky chasers! I was glad when Friday came round so I could get home to recover. I arrived at Victoria station at some dreadfully early hour on Saturday morning and whilst I was waiting for a taxi to arrive a member of the station staff asked me where I wanted to go. When I told him Bleasby he said he would take me there for a quid so I accepted his offer.

I've been to Scotland many times since. When I worked for East Coast Finance they made me the regional accountant for Scotland and I used to catch an early morning plane from EMA to Glasow and stay overnight. One morning in the office I was asked where I'd been the previous evening. I told them I went to a couple of pubs in the Gorbals. They were horrified and I was told in no uncertain terms that was an unsafe thing to do! I quite enjoyed chatting to the locals and had no problems.

We still go to west coast of Scotland for holidays where we rent a cottage by the sea. We would be there now if it wasn't for the virus restrictions. I love Scotland and can't wait to get back. I would like to live there but my wife dislikes the Scots!

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An interesting tale Phil. I too have enjoyed Scotland when we went on steam weekend. Took in the Waverley, the Sir Walter Scott on Lake Katrine and a trip on the West Highland railway. Thing was, my wife couldn't get porridge  anywhere, until the last morning, she resigned herself to Weetabix and partial Scottish breakfast. When finished, a young harrased waitress rushed over with a steaming bowl of porridge, so I said " you'd better eat it now they've been out to get some oats". Won't repeat what she said. Would love to go back. B.

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The first morning at breakfast in the hotel the waitress said 'will ye no be havin' the porridge?' I replied 'is it compulsory?' There was a deadly silence! :biggrin: 

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My late wife and I had a driving holiday in Scotland in 1967.  Mostly B&B so we felt like we got to know the locals a bit in each place.  We were treated really well and generously, even being invited to join with them for supper if we arrived a bit early.  No extra charge.  I can't say I've ever met a mean Scotsman.

We often wondered if they thought we were honeymooners.  I was 22 and she was 21.  Folks were too polite to ask directly.  We'd actually been married almost two years.

If I ever moved back to the UK  (doubtful now) I think I'd like to live up in the highlands somewhere far from a city.

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