Paddy Wheatfields

Camp near Walter Halls School

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Just talking about the old camp on the field at the side of Walter Halls School, Wells Road. What was it originally, and how did families get put in there?

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It's a new one on me, but looking on old maps it seems to be officially called 'The Hutted Camp, Ransom Road". It looks like an army camp with a lot of huts; and then below it is a strange collection of things which might or might not be buildings.

5klhGPK.jpg

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Could  they some sort of fortification or armourment CT? Not know the date, just guessing.

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Paddy..your recollections appear to be in living memory, So I hope I'm totally wrong here! 

I'm sure I read a reference to a 'hospital' on Ransom Road pre 1920.

 

CT..what date is the map?

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Could the 'hospital' on Ransom Road be Mapperley Hospital ?  It had access from Wells Road as well as Porchester Road.

 

The map is early 1950s.

 

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From here; http://www.chezfred.org.uk/gp/FullAlbertHall/16CHAPTER16.htm

 

(being at the bottom of Coppice Road, now Ransom Road. By 1851)

From the bottom of Coppice Road and up to Mapperley were gardens and the Rifle Range (the Butts) where the local Volunteer Regiment did their firing practice.

 

That may be the area down from the Huts

 

 

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I'll change what I said earlier.

 

The 'hospital' on Ransom Road was Coppice Hospital, which was converted to apartments and is now known as Hine Hall.

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HSR..knob on youth.."The Lunatic Asylum" on Coppice Rd. had nowt to do with the other place.

TC Hine designed the Coppice Rd Asylum..work being completed in 1859.

George Hine ( son of ) designed Mapperley Hospital..later...

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If the ‘huts’ were there c.1920, they were probably “recycled” Army huts from 1914-18. They could have been from a local base, or even possibly from the Machine Gun Corps camp at Belton near Grantham, which was huge! These huts were well-built and some lasted well into the 1970s at least - my school in Grantham had one which housed the domestic science classroom and dinner hall, and others had new lives as village halls, so it’s entirely possible that’s what these ‘huts’ were (I saw one still in existence, but showing its age, a year or two back in Co. Durham - not bad for ‘temporary’ structures to reach 100 years old!)

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Oh dear!..what a silly billy for deleting..'knob on' and 'cock on' are not rude or sexual..thay depict correctness..check our local history for the meanings...a laugh...and sad!

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The four octagonal structures are either;

 

Anti tank gun pits,,, unlikely

Anti Aircraft gun pits,, quite possibly

Riffle and ammunition storage pits,, most likely

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   If you compare Cliff Ton's map with google maps, you can clearly see one of the funny buildings remains as a crop mark in a field.

I don't think this particular one is shown on his map. Hut 9 appears to still be there, along with another possible that doesn't have a number, located to the left of hut 9. You can also see the pathway through the trees just above it.

   The earthworks around these buildings is puzzling, and points to some form of military use. The curved pathways could allude to some form of movement of shells.

  Another strange feature which may or may not have any bearing, but a house on Blythe Street has an observation room on it's roof.

  Not all World War 1 military installations were recorded as such.

  I can't find any reference to Mapperley being used as a military hospital, but then again the powers wouldn't have necessarily wanted the public to know about the mental state of their armed forces. Bagthorpe is recorded as a military hospital at this time.

  Doesn't answer the question though.

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Just had a memory alert!  Can now remember being told that the tunnels on the Suburban Railway were used for storing ammunition  trains.

This being the unofficial reason for the station closures in 1916.

 May be there is a connection?

The official reason for their closures was put down to staff shortages, due to the war. 

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Another thought! Maybe the Zeppelin was after this location when he bombed the brick works. He wasn't far off his target, if indeed he knew about it.

 

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As previously stated..happy to be wrong..

Glad to know that they appear to be Military instillations. Had visions of Halfway Houses or possibly overspill...

 

Dark Angel...I know nothing about raiiways but i do recall reading about hospital trains arriving at Thorneywood Station during the First World War.

 

 

 

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On 10/15/2019 at 9:35 PM, IAN123. said:

HSR..knob on youth.."The Lunatic Asylum" on Coppice Rd. had nowt to do with the other place.

TC Hine designed the Coppice Rd Asylum..work being completed in 1859.

George Hine ( son of ) designed Mapperley Hospital..later...

 

Call me a knob as much as you want..;)

Easy price to pay for all the brilliant pictures & info you post!

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HSR 

photos  of old Nottingham are easy to get 

The Evening post had a collection of mags called "Time to Remember"   

Photo's are from Nottingham Historical Film Unit collection founded by Richard llifle and Wilford Brabbuley year 1960 Historial notes are by Guy Denison 

Example  No 3 mag is all about "Pubs" & "Streets" of Nottingham

""  ""    ""   No 2 "Covers Public Transport" back to 1870

more mags    Nottingham  90 years a City

"""""""""""""""   Nottingham at War   1939-1945

"""""""""""""""   Nottingham   50 years of peace 

      AND "MEMORIES OF NOTTINGHAM"    Page after page of PURE NOTTINGHAM NOSTALGIA      1940s 50s 60s

I would like to give a big thanks to my father (dad) who was interested in our city to collect all these Nottingham /Nottinghamshire  Mags and many more that he had about Nottingham. RIP Walter x

 

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13 hours ago, Dark Angel said:

Just had a memory alert!  Can now remember being told that the tunnels on the Suburban Railway were used for storing ammunition  trains.

This being the unofficial reason for the station closures in 1916.

 May be there is a connection?

The official reason for their closures was put down to staff shortages, due to the war. 

 

Regarding earthworks..  Below is not a map from Nottm, but does show a former munitions depot near Rainford Lancs, now used for warehousing. It has similar odd looking earthworks. (Raised banks between each brick building..to direct any blast upward.  It was a WW2 construction and it is still just possible to see a curved 'crop mark' showing a former link to the railway, which in turn goes to Kikby near Liverpool, which had a large munitions factory in WW2.

 

https://www.google.com/maps/@53.4983731,-2.8096792,1927m/data=!3m1!1e3

 

Just sayin'

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The camp was an army camp, I used to play on there in the early 50's as my great aunt lived on Caunton ave. And yes the areas mentioned were probably munitions storage.

 

There was another thread a while ago mentioning same.

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Long time,  no see Banjo. Welcome back.

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In the same area, Just off the Wells Rd. my uncle’s father, Elijah Burton, the coal merchant and builder had a firelighter factory. Apparently the factory was hit by a stray wartime shell and you can imagine the result! I can’t find anything about this now but the info came from my late uncle and is reliable.

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There was a Heavy Anti-Aircraft Battery situated at Mapperley, so the camp was presumably that.

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I am not a chemist, so may be barking up the wrong tree.

However, I will proceed into the unknown. Large quantities of nitro glycerine were required as a propellant in the production of cordite.

In liquid form it is highly unstable and extremely difficult to transport, needing to be kept cool at all times.

This would necessitate it's manufacture at the site of the blending with other elements to produce a paste. This would form a 'cake' mixture which would be warmed in stoving houses. I think the odd elliptical shapes on Cliff Tons map could be these.The earth works indicate that something explosive was around this site.

If you look on google maps, it can be seen that the gulag building is surrounded by steps indicating varying levels.

This manufacturing process tended to be carried out in small locations in the event of something going wrong, thereby ensuing production continued elsewhere. Also some locations converted to the manufacture of shells weren't large enough to carry out this activity. 

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This is just pre-war, and there's no sign of anything to come later. The white square is where the huts would be, and the circle where the round shapes would be.

JLTCqgv.jpg

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The site was definitely the Anti-Aircraft Battery, as evidenced...

 

https://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?a=0&hob_id=1473141https://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?a=0&hob_id=1473141

 

Whilst ack ack guns were usually mobile, the permanent camps may have had emplacements built to accomodate the guns, particularly heavier ones like these. I suppose there would be searchlight positions too.

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