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We never add salt to food or have salt on the table, I do remember Christmas Day when Mrs Red cooked dinner, both my Son-in-law & father-in-law salted their food before even tasting it, must admit it did annoy me, I would have loved to have picked the table up & chucked it, but that would have ruined Christmas Day. 

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My Parents shake salt over every meal before they have even tasted a bit of it, salad is the worst - its go to be 40% salt by the time they're finished. And then they have the audacity to say..it adds flavour. No, it adds SALT. My blood boils. There's never any interest in say Pesto, Horseradish, Speciality Pepper, Herbs etc etc. even when out on table.

Is it something to do with age or being a smoker ??

Our Sunday dinner when kids in the 60's  had a ton of salt added to every cooking pan - no wonder I cant touch salt now ( well except on a few chips, but i also add pepper was well- weird i know) 

 

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I love adding black pepper and freshly ground peperoncino ( chilli) to everything. Not quite everything but you know what I mean. I can't stand ready ground chilli powder , it tastes old and musty.

When I first went to Sicily with my husband before we were married we visited his aunt and uncle. The aunt prepared a green salad to accompany the main course and it was so salty. I didn't like to leave it as I thought it bad manners but somehow made an excuse that I was so full ( then missed out on the dessert). Since then i only use evo and balsamic with just a tiny sprinkling of salt . Much tastier.

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It's a almost perfect climate here for growing and drying chilli peppers and we grow lots of them. We have the walls of the outbuildings festooned with chilli plants hanging up to dry - plenty for us and the village.The problem with them is that, even when dry, they are quite soft in texture and difficult to grind into a powder. We have found that a quick oven dry roast and treatment in a liquidiser works wonders but only do a few at a time to preserve freshness.

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3 hours ago, jonab said:

It's a almost perfect climate here for growing and drying chilli peppers and we grow lots of them. We have the walls of the outbuildings festooned with chilli plants hanging up to dry - plenty for us and the village.The problem with them is that, even when dry, they are quite soft in texture and difficult to grind into a powder. We have found that a quick oven dry roast and treatment in a liquidiser works wonders but only do a few at a time to preserve freshness.

 

This year I only have one chilli plant and I haven't picked them but they look very dry and crinkly but are still soft. It's very humid here so think I will have to bring them in for a "quick roast". 

Years ago our old neighbour asked me if I liked chilli, when I said I did he brought me a huge plant of them complete with the roots. I dried them all and put them in oil. That oil and chillies lasted us years. We had a bar at that time ( 40 yrs ago) and my son and husband had to be there for opening at 6am, getting there to prepare briocche etc for breakfasts. During our winters the temperature around that time used to be 18- 20 c below zero so my husband used to open the jar of chillies and take out a couple and eat them , warming him up as he got outside maybe to shovel snow away. As the oil went down I topped it up with fresh to " dilute " it a bit because it was very strong. 

We had  friends round for dinner one evening and knew one of the men liked chilli so we offered it to him and he piled it up on his plate and said it probably wasn't as strong as he liked it......he changed his mind and colour after tasting it. ( served him right for bragging) :rulez:Taste first

Jonab I don't use the pepper mill for grinding them I use a small coffee grinder and keep it for that reason. But careful when you take the top off ...stand back and keep it away from you. 

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It's very low humidity here (most of the time) so chillies ripen and mature perfectly. As for grinding them, we also use a coffee mill for small amounts - I meant to say that although liquidiser slipped on to the keyboard - same mode of action though.

 

The wife of one of the vintners in the village here who makes a chilli conserve (with my chillies) and we get a few pots in payment. As far as I know, it's just chillies and sugar bashed up together.

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