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HI CATZ / Nice of you to answer, I am now living in Swinton , Manchester, but still miss Nottingham, I will be 75 in March and I look back on my life , and were iv,e been , but I

They were still doing a little bit of that in 1987 when I started working there. There were no depots at the resorts by then but we still took a few cases; growing car ownership and package holidays k

My godfather, Derek Foster worked for Harris for many years; he ended up driving a road sweeper for Gedling council, said it was the best job you could wish for. He always told me to avoid road haulag

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10 hours ago, Scriv said:

As indeed is a fag lighter and an ashtray!

 

True. My car has two round sockets, but one is used for the dashcam and the other for charging mobile phones or the satnav.

 

My wife now has to bring her own lighter when she wants to pollute the air in the car. Her ashtray is a plastic pot that fits into a cup holder, which came with a car I bought ten years ago and which has stayed with us ever since.

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On 1/19/2018 at 7:58 PM, IAN123. said:

Hoveringham Leyland for Scriv

images.jpeg

 

Were they underpowered?

The Clydesdale I occasionally drove for Clearways didn't have a lot of grunt in it, specially loaded to the gunwales with Glow-worm boiler parts!

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Ewan McColl recorded a song many years ago called The Old AEC.

Wagons are much more interesting than cars anyway. When on the Mway, I always notice foreign reg plates. Such variety.

Even one from Belarusse the other day.

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12 hours ago, IAN123. said:

 Sounds a sensible lad Affergorritt, me too- I don't know why I loved wagons...maybe the locale as a kid; watching BFI,BRS,Atlas Express etc ..come to Dennis & Roberts.

Up until a few years ago Limerick Racecourse did vintage haulage shows... acres of Fodens,Antars , Guys.

Mark Knopfler recorded a beautiful song a few years ago 'Border Reiver'

a tribute to the Albion,marvelous piece of music.

Here you go youth !

 

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I'm amazed that non of the loaded vehicles had tarpaulins, ropes, nets or straps. They must have been well stacked.

Also, they look so tiny to what's on the roads today, but they pale into insignificance when you see the rigs on Ice Road Truckers.

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Fly we often went with a tail only rope when carrying bagged cement for short distance's.

 

Did get caught out once though, coming back down the Ashbourne road into Buxton heading for my favourite café. Went round into Dale road a wee bit to fast and lost 4 bags of hydrated lime forgot they only weighed 56lb not 112lb, damn nearly an hour with the brush never made to café.

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On 2/19/2018 at 2:05 PM, IAN123. said:

Cleanest units in Nottm were Stirlands.

Smiths of Eccles wagons were popular at one time.

 

 

Legend has it that when Jack Stirland was in charge, any driver whom he saw leaving the yard with a dirty lorry was for the high jump when he got back.

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William Stobart is most particular about his wagons being spotless too, but somehow, it's extremely difficult in weather conditions such as we're currently experiencing.

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Always remember when I was on NCT, a bus could be washed & hit the streets at 4am. A few hours later the windows could be filthy, twelve hours later really filthy. Then the moans & complaints would start ! Some situations you can never win.

Same thing with litter on the bus floor, nice & clean first thing but like the windows were badly littered a few hours later, bleddy passengers.

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Not exactly Nottingham but not far away,  Ambergate, this is one for you old school lorry drivers

 

 

 

Rog

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Cracking video and truck, Sammy Longstone was nearly all 8 leg Fodens.

 

Remember one particular occasion back in the late 60s, one of the drivers had took his truck home ready for an early start in the morning and as usual had raised the back end slightly to run any rain off. Got up half a sleep and off he went forgetting the PTO, 200 yards railway bridge, back end in the road, came clean off the chassis, back to Sammy's pick up your cards.

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On 4/2/2018 at 9:39 PM, NewBasfordlad said:

Lost art these days Ian I would take a bet not many of todays drivers could rope and sheet a load.

They're not damn well allowed to!

 

Some great genius a few years ago decreed that roping and sheeting was no longer suitable for securing flatbed loads because (you're not going to believe this) the ropes haven't been individually strength tested.

 

Anyoner who's done it (I could but would not claim to have ever mastered the art) knows that if it's done properly, you can tip the damn lorry upside down and shake it and nowt will  move!

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The end result is that roads are now littered with broken ratchet straps, the hooks and tensioners of which are lethal to motorcycles.

 

Everything now has to be secured to the loadbed; internal straps on curtainsider trailers are pretty much banned. VOSA, or DVSA as rhey're now called, are self-financing and much depends if you get pulled on how well you pass the attitude test.

 

I got my first lessons at BRS Langley Mill about 1984; I was FLT driving there for Mayday.Liverpool trunk used to roll in 20 ton of John West tinned goods all stacked on pallets. Driver used to reload with Hammonds sauce and after I'd watched him sheet up in awe a few times he started letting me help him. That bloke was an absolute master, at the back of the trailer two fins went down to the corners inch-perfect and you could swear he'd ironed it.

 

Trust me you'll be glad you don't drive HGV these days.As we both know there was no finer sight to an experienced driver than to stand back from roping and sheeting a load and seeing every fold, crease and dolly perfectly positioned. Horrible job on a cold wet day I admit but it certainly separated the drivers from the steering wheel attendants.

 

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