Ayupmeducks

Admin
  • Content Count

    10,853
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    14

Everything posted by Ayupmeducks

  1. Ayupmeducks

    Keep One Drop One

    Drama Queen.
  2. Ayupmeducks

    Keep One Drop One

    Dinner Jacket.
  3. Ayupmeducks

    Keep One Drop One

    Life Boat.
  4. Ayupmeducks

    Keep One Drop One

    Raw Meat.
  5. Ayupmeducks

    Beekay's paintings

    Lead or zinc??
  6. Ayupmeducks

    Beekay's paintings

    BK is it red lead or red oxide???? Years back when I was in the electrical motor repair trade we were using red zinc oxide primer. Doing some research though, red lead paint can still be bought, but I'd hazard a guess it can only be used on limited applications. I've a couple of cans of red zinc oxide primer on my paint shelf.
  7. Ayupmeducks

    Boring Repetitive Posts

    Plenty of reviews and how to videos here. https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=3D+printers
  8. Ayupmeducks

    Boring Repetitive Posts

    There's some fairly reliable desk top printers that market for around $200, like I said earlier, they are limited to the size of the object you want to print, but check them out on Youtube. Like the CNC routing machines that are desk top, they are limited on table size, but cheap enough to get and a good learning machine. I have a project ready for when I get a CNC router, I want to make some wood back splash "tiles" from wood with carved background for both the kitchen and bathrooms, bathrooms probably flowers, kitchen I haven't a clue yet, but I'm sure wifey with have some ideas.
  9. Ayupmeducks

    Boring Repetitive Posts

    The only extras you will need are a dedicated computer, an old one running windows 2000, XP, Vista or 7 will do the job, usually the software for the printer will come with it or a free download from the manufacturer of the printer. I'm lucky, I have several old computers that will do the jobs for me.
  10. Ayupmeducks

    Boring Repetitive Posts

    Gem, go to Youtube and in there search window type in 3D printers, you can see what they are capable of, obviously a desk top 3d printer is limited to what it can make, but for all practical purposes will do what most people want. They are plastic moulding machines in reality, using different types of plastic and actually melt the plastic at the print head onto a hot platter and steadily build up the 3d component.
  11. Ayupmeducks

    Boring Repetitive Posts

    You mean it does it's own thing???
  12. Ayupmeducks

    Boring Repetitive Posts

    I'm drooling over a CNC small router..Sorry Ben "Computer Numerical Controlled". I can see it getting lots of usage, but will be later in the year before I get one, then a 3d printer and 3d scanner. I love tools even though they find me more work to carry out.
  13. Ayupmeducks

    Musing on "Making ends meet"......

    Basically you could only get large coal from collieries employing trepanners to cut the coal. Pre mechanisation when coal was won by hand, customers only wanted large coal, railways, factory boilers household coal. The largest customer of the 60's, 70's and up to the end was the power generators, they wanted small coal which was pulverized to powder at the power stations.
  14. Ayupmeducks

    Grape Vines

    Finally, getting grape vines planted, 4-Cayua, 2-Edelwies, 3-Neptune and 2- Concorde I grew from cuttings last year. Started a grape vine nursery and when I prune them next years will set the pruning's in pots to raise more vines. Going to take wild grape vine cuttings later this year too, although the grapes are pea sized, due to the fact they are out of control, I've read they make good wine, in fact there's a winery farther north of me that just grows cultivars of the native wild grapes, and have won a few prizes in wine fests.
  15. Regarding cars and cops, if one saw me getting out my truck, he'd accuse me of being intoxicated, my knees have had it and takes me some time to walk properly. All those DUI tests they do I couldn't do these days, I'd fall over, all I could do was request a breathalizer test and be done with it.
  16. I know that feeling Dave, had to learn to walk again after I'd got over Lyme disease, started with a walking stick up my drive, 1/2 a mile, took me about a couple of hours there and back, then stepping and up and down on a concrete building block, working two two pound bar bells weights to gain arm strength...Jeeze it was painful. No pain, no gain.
  17. Ayupmeducks

    Beards and Tashes

    No problems Gem, Staithes was just a couple of hundred yards south of Boulby's main gate, one of "C" shifts Banksmen lived there and was a volunteer lifeboats man, one of the miners I worked with lived there too. I lived at Loftus, couple of miles north.
  18. Ayupmeducks

    Beards and Tashes

    Quite a few I worked with ended up migrating, one elec to Canada, my elec Engineer ended up in Queensland, Australia and retired from the Mines Inspectorate, two miners I worked with who hailed from Kellingley ended up back in coal mining in Canada, "C" shift mining supervisor to South Africa, his replacement migrated to Australia, where he was the Under Manager of a Colliery I ended up at for a few years.
  19. Ayupmeducks

    Beards and Tashes

    If he was there in the early sixties, he'd have been on site clearance, shafts weren't sunk until around 69. When I started, No1 shaft hadn't been completed very long, and was having the steelwork installed for the skipping plant. That was early 1975. All the surface works were complete, offices, mine services, processing plant, which was operational, rail loading. But we were only just developing the Underground workings. Full production started around August of 75. Again when I started, there were around 1000 men employed underground working four shifts, plus contractors. Some 350 to 400 on the surface. With the shift system we worked, it was impossible to know everyone, union meetings held once a month gave me a chance to meet the rest of the electrical staff, and later when I took over as central and ore handling electrician underground, with unlimited overtime, I got to know a fair few of the other shifts by covering them on overtime. Shifts were "A", "B", "C" and "D", we rotated through a complicated 8 hour shift system 7 days a week. The only time the plant closed down was Christmas Day and Boxing Day. Other than those two days, the rest of the year was normal working. We got paid double time, or treble time, or double and a day off in lieu for public holidays, I carried the days off in lieu to my annual leave time. There's a Boulby Mine group on FB, one of the "old" hands posted a lot of rare photos of the site, before and during the site clearance. I found other photos on line of the shaft collars being excavated, collars being poured with concrete and start of shaft sinking. Some other photos show the winding engines being installed, No2, 3,500HP and No1, 7000HP, both high voltage DC motors, and winding engine halls being built around them.
  20. Ayupmeducks

    ideas for inventions practical or daft

    Cats are carnivores, in the wild they don't eat vegetation, other than grass to make them vomit to clear hair balls. Dogs on the other hand are omnivores like us, a fact I found out from a vet years back, she said wild dogs eat the contents of their "kill's" stomachs. My cat lives outside, she was the offspring of a feral cat that showed up one day and left her here, even though she gets meat and cat food from us, she eats out often, keeping the local rodent population in check.
  21. Ayupmeducks

    Beards and Tashes

    I grew my first beard out of frustration when I worked at Boulby Potash mine, It was either five o clock shadow or pure torture at work. You don't realize that when shaving you remove a layer of skin, very thin, but a layer. Once I started sweating underground and the salts in the ore from the mineral we were mining combined, it was like using a continuous application of after shave lotion, multiplied by ten! So beards were the fashion at Boulby. Everyone from Whitby to Middlesbrough knew with fair accuracy that usually a bearded man probably worked at Boulby. It's been shaven off about three times in the last 42 years, but it's here to stay now.
  22. Ayupmeducks

    Grape Vines

    Mary, you was probably pruning them wrong, this year growth is next years fruiting canes.
  23. Ayupmeducks

    Grape Vines

    They have to be pruned each spring, or they will get out of control in no time. Native wild ones around here, many are really thick at the base and climb trees 50 feet high in just a few years. For the best fruit, they need to be trained and heavily pruned each year, leaving just a few buds on last years growth. You should see my Kiwi vines!!! They recommend twice a year pruning of those.
  24. Ayupmeducks

    Grape Vines

    Exactly, drying adds up cost and lost profit, so once a harvest is started it continues until the crop is in. Like hay making, the grass is cut, then "tedded" (mechanically raked into rows) left to dry for a day or two to stop mildew, then rolled into large bales. Very few around me use square balers anymore.
  25. Ayupmeducks

    Grape Vines

    Over this side of the pond in the corn fields, some at a few hundred acres, the will work until all corn cobs are harvested, might take many dark hours as well as light hours, with wheat, you don't want it wet when you fetch it in, so if rains in the forecast and the heads of wheat are ripe, it's all hands on deck and stay with it until it's all in. I live in a very rural area, but little to no arable farming around here, cattle sheep and goats seem to be the top animals. Since world prices for beef have gone through the roof, pasture is getting used up, I've had farmers ask me if I want to lease my 80 acres. There used to be a farm to the west, about 20 miles, who raised Buffalo for beef, not seen any for ages on his land. Very expensive meat and very low fat. As for Vineyards, Missouri has many, some producing fruit wines, most grape vines and wines, there's even one that raises the native grape vines and produces award winning wines from the those vines. On my land in the wooded areas are native grape vines, at ground level I've seen vines as thick as a mans leg, because they are growing wild they only produce pea sized grapes, I'll be out today looking for vines that are just started within the last couple of years and take cuttings. I'd like to see how they fare under controlled cultivation.