DJ360

How's your day?

Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, DJ360 said:

This morning I made Hummus

 

Sorry I don't speak culinary, I have no idea what all that means...    :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Brew said:

Col that sounds OK. Remember though if you have to run the circuit back to the board it becomes liable to a part P notification and test.

 

It won't come to that.  Only thing that occurs is that I need to check whether I still have sections labelled 'upstairs' and 'downstairs' sockets, as this would effectively be an upstairs socket wired with the 'downstairs' lot.

 

I need to check this out with lights too. I used to have two sections labelled upstairs lights and downstairs lights.  With new distribution board, I now just have two sections labelled 'lights'. It's not clear exactly what each breaker controls..something I still need to check out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Brew said:

 

Sorry I don't speak culinary, I have no idea what all that means...    :wacko:

 

You don't know what hummus is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never made it myself - buy mine in little pots from Tesco...

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard of it but honestly would not recognise it and there is not a chance I would ever try to make such stuff..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, DJ360 said:

You don't know what hummus is?

 

19 minutes ago, Brew said:

Sorry I don't speak culinary, I have no idea what all that means...    :wacko:

 

I always thought hummus was the collective noun for a group of these.

2muPohI.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Naahhh.. They're Hummers.  The collective noun for them is a 'Stench'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Brew said:

I have heard of it but honestly would not recognise it and there is not a chance I would ever try to make such stuff..

 

It is so simple.  I use a method where you blend the lemon and tahini first, then add everything else.  But I'm pretty sure you'd get great results just by chucking it all in and blending for a few minutes.

A lot cheaper than the supermarket variety and of course you can vary the mix, add other stuff, or whatever.

 

In the middle east they just seem to mash all the ingredients up in a stainless steel bowl before putting very hot spiced oil on top, along with spices.

 

I put my finished hummus in a bowl and top with a sprinkling of paprika and a drizzle of olive oil. I usually eat it with Doritos to convince myself I'm not really eating much...

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Col, no wonder you've a rash after consuming that lot !  I've had bacon, egg, beans, mushrooms and toast, and my skin is perfect ! 

Try it !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did, yesterday, but without the beans..

I'm a purist re: an 'English' and I never think beans are quite right with it.  Tomatoes are acceptable, but must be cooked down so that there isn't half a gallon of juice sloshing abaahht on yer plate mekkin  yer toast or fried slice soggeh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, DJ360 said:

spiced oil on top, along with spices.

 

 

...and there's the problem for me right there. I can't abide spicy food, as an example many Cornish pasties are too spicy for me. I had to look up what Tahini is, it doesn't sound all that appetising to be honest...

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need for it to be spicy in the 'hot' sense.  Mine isn't.

It can be as simple as chickpeas, a little lemon juice and olive oil, blended up.

Cumin adds a little earthy fragrance.. very middle eastern but not 'hot'.

Tahini is very 'umami' ish, and slightly bitter.. almost like a concentrated peanut butter taste.  It's optional... as is garlic.. or the quantity thereof.

 

I'd say just try it.  A little pot from Tesco.  You may be surprised.  I really didn't fancy it until I tried it, but then I was an immediate convert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, tomatoes Col, yes, I had grilled tomatoes too.

Tahini ? I thought that was an idyllic island in the South Pacific !

No, I'm not taking the wee wee Col, nobody knows what we like until we try it. Well done.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True you don't know what things are like til you try them. Have thought about making hummus but never got round to it. Have quite a few tins of Ceci ( chick peas ) so may try it for tomorrow. Certainly not cooking in this heat. My daughter is bringing something cold from her restaurant. Russian salad and some Courgettes  in sweet and sour marinade. Delicious with crusty bread.

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oooooooo get you with your posh nosh :laugh: my lad buys it, looks like poo poo!    

 

I thought it was a Palestinian Sunni-Islamist fundamentalist organisation?  

Tic tic tic boooom!  :Shock:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I managed a shuffle out to my garden this morning and saw that the peas had fattened up and the French beans were ready, together with some very first new potatoes, I asked the wife if I could have some with some salad for my dinner. Come dinner time the new potatoes tasted like those from years ago and the French beans were tender and tasty but no garden peas, she told me there were very few in each pod.  I thought this strange so this evening I ventured up the garden , looking at the peas left and all the pods seemed to have plenty in them , but have not filled out yet. I found in one corner a pile of discarded pods carefully hidden away . I have that feeling that they may have been full of peas but never made it to the kitchen.  There is no taste better than freshly harvested home grown food especially peas, if they reach the kitchen.

  • Like 9
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Brew said:

Perhaps Ayeup you could ask these experts just what it is about a ring main that is so 'highly dangerous', I'd be very interested to know.

Well with over 50 years post apprentice experience as an electrician, you could say I'm an expert Brew. The fact is, a ring circuit has many consuming devices within the ring, problem comes when one has to work on one of the circuits and do not realize it's a ring circuit, which can and usually has two points of isolation.

I'm informed that the elec at the long gone Cotgrave Colliery had a job to do on the 6.6Kv underground feeders, he wasn't conversant with ring mains and even though he'd isolated and even pulled the breaker , he hadn't taken into account the other leg of the ring main, it was still alive at 6600 volts. The very reason my old engineer at Clifton disapprove of ring mains. When we arrived at Cotgrave, we were warned verbally about the ring main, and that it was in full use, so if we had to work on any part of it, ISOLATE both legs.

In domestic wiring there is absolutely no sane reason to install a ring main, the only reason it's used is to use lower rated cables to cut costs.. Costs are probably only a few quid, and in my opinion, the costs don't justify the safety of anyone who might work on it, including the DIY home owner Brew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that ring mains were ‘invented’ back in more austere times as a cost saving measure for expensive copper cable rather than using individual spurs. Additionally the load on the cable is not always evenly distributed where there are appliances close together as in kitchens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Send her down to Aldi Trogg, and get yourself a tin of peas. Take care of yourself  mate ! All the best, Beekay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite correct Phil, I didn't think they were allowed this side of the pond, so checked the NEC, (National Electric Code) seems they are, but stringent rules apply. My wife worked as a purchasing agent for one of California's biggest electrical contractors and she'd never heard of them, so  they are probably are pretty rare in the US. Pity Dave isn't around, he had his contracting license in Canada, so could throw some light on them, their rules are pretty close to US rules.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a degree qualified Engineer Ayeup I have to say that your permit to work system was worse than useless or the engineer issuing it wasn't worth a damn.

It makes me cross when people do stupid things and then claim they are not to blame.

 

Of course a ring circuit powers many devices, that's what it's for!  The problems come about when idiots call themselves electricians and can't be trusted to put batteries in a torch, I hope you are not one of them.

Any electrician unable to correctly identify a circuit has no business calling himself an electrician. You should know with your experience that even after identifying and isolating a circuit you NEVER touch a conductive part until you have proved it dead.

There are lots of circuit diagrams for HV ring mains on the net. Show me one that cannot be isolated and made safe to work on. To say a properly installed  ring circuit is dangerous is nonsense.

 

I'm not going to argue the merits of radial v ring, there are advantages and disadvantages to both and both should be equally safe.

 

A quick look round with my friend Mr Google informs me that in the US the 6th biggest killer in the workplace is electrocution. In the UK HSE report of 2018 it doesn't even gain a mention - makes you think...

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, philmayfield said:

Hummus! Disgusting foreign muck! smile2

 

Compared to what? :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no idea how large companies work as regards to safety workings Brew, so cannot comment on safety procedures or even permit to work schemes stateside.

I served my time with the old NCB, so I'm familiar with it and the old M&Q Act regarding electricity in mining, it's applications and it's authorization of personnel and practices.

The NCB had a permit to work scheme that the individual authorized person, electricians and mechanics we supposed to use, in fact, I persuaded the Elec in Charge at Boulby to introduce it there underground and it worked well.

At British Gypsum at East Leake, we were responsible for our own safety, ie isolation and making sure a circuit was dead before working on it.

I might add, it's illegal to expose live conductors above 25 V dc to the atmosphere in any type of mine under the M&Q Act which also covers other minerals than coal under a separate Act.

In Australia, namely NSW, where I worked, the CMRA forbid anyone from being exposed to live conductors, each electrician was authorized by the Manager in writing to carry out his work, all companies down under work with the danger tag system. If a danger tag is tied to an isolator, only a senior member of staff could remove it if a tradesman had forgotten to remove it.

As a Leading Hand elec, (Chargehand) I was authorized to isolate HV circuits and earth them for the electricians or myself to work on. Permits to work were unknown, work orders were.

I had one accident on my shift, one of my electricians was burned on a 1.1Kv circuit he'd failed to isolate, long story, but the Mines Inspector ordered him be fired and was going ahead with a prosecution. Both were dropped on the pleading by the Colliery Elec Engineer, again long story and there were mitigating circumstances. Inspector decided to drop the case on condition safety was tightened up and it never happened again.

Again, accidents happen, and ring mains are asking for an accident! Unless you've done regular nightshifts you will never see my point, one becomes a walking zombie after a few years of nights!

As an example, one of my electricians called me one night to a problem he had, I might add he was a very competent elec, good at his job. He said he felt like an idiot calling me but couldn't locate a problem with a load centre. So I went down and helped him locate the problem, a loose wire he'd missed, and has happened to even the best elec's in the world at one time or another.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...