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And what I am actually ..really listening to now.. courtesy of my Innuos Streamer ...at the moment..is..

 

It's deeply unfashionable now.. but it is still a brilliant album.. and the title song is epic..

 

 

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Ben, another group called The Spinners with some fantastic shots of the UK. The song was all about the "Right to Roam". Written by Ewan MacColl I've walked and climbed in most of the places in th

Moved into our new home today,,now sat quietly apart from a little jig when the music of Dr Hook gets too much to sit still, The site seems to have got back to its friendly ways,,so I'm back,,

Hey, Ayup Ben, pleased to see you back and sorry you’ve had health issues but hope you settle into your new home quickly.  Did you get out before the rent man called?   Just hope that a few of th

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 don't get what you are saying HSR

 

Cant say, who's recollection, I don't read Wiki, 

To attribute Pill Box, Just Like women, & Rolling stone to being about Edie, is, the best assumption I  can come to...

Didn't Joe Boyd say the frst drum beat of 'Rolling Stone' was like a gavel coming down?

 

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Yes, Dire Straits, Mark Knopfler, here he is with another guitar legend performing Going Home.

Hank now lives in Perth West Australia.

 

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Don't think they made a bad song......

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Here's another one that skimmed the charts in 1966. Liverpool band operating as part of the Joe Meek stable, with their version of the Drifters 1961 song 'Please Stay'

 

 

 

 

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19 hours ago, HSR said:

 don't get what you are saying HSR

 

Cant say, who's recollection, I don't read Wiki, 

To attribute Pill Box, Just Like women, & Rolling stone to being about Edie, is, the best assumption I  can come to...

Didn't Joe Boyd say the frst drum beat of 'Rolling Stone' was like a gavel coming down?

 

 

 

Maybe you should read the Wiki link.. it's not contagious.  But if you really can't.. plenty to go at here.

 

https://duckduckgo.com/?t=ffab&q=Dylan+Songs+inspired+by+Edie+Sedgewick&ia=web

 

I think it's pretty clear Pill Box Hat and Just Like a Woman are Sedgewick inspired.  Like a Rolling Stone is a bit more problematic.. not least because I once read that Dylan had asked 'Has it never occurred to you that I was talking about myself?"  On the back of that.. one commentator has constructed a whole theory that Dylan was speculating on his loss of popularity and influence after 'going electric'.. but I'm pretty sure that is stretching a point.. and it also completely fails to explain the lyrics:

 

"Aw, you've gone to the finest school all right, Miss Lonely
But ya know ya only used to get juiced in it

Nobody's ever taught ya how to live out on the street
And now you’re gonna have to get used to it."

 

Which pretty much exactly detail Edie's life before she broke away from her family and got involved with Warhol.

 

I'm not convinced by Dylan's 'Talking about myself' explanation.. but if he said it after Edie died.. it might be his way of distancing himself from his sarcastic treatment of her. I also reckon that Dylan at the time was struggling with his own fame and sick of being constantly asked to justify and explain every word.. which led him to lash out sometimes.

 

 

 

 

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Tonight I'm listening to The Drifters.  Their hit album "I'll Take You Where the Music's Playing" was a high spot.  There's not a bad song on it.. but these two are sequenced on side 1 and have always been favourites. Johnny Moore was singing at his  peerless peak:

 

 

 

Class!

 

 

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Well.. if nobody else is playing....

 

I only have one Linda Ronstadt album but it contains my two favourite songs by her:

 

First..written by Mike Nesmith of Monkey's fame.

 

 

 

Nice.

 

 

 

 

 

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On 5/3/2021 at 12:19 AM, DJ360 said:

 

I think it's pretty clear Pill Box Hat and Just Like a Woman are Sedgewick inspired

 

 ??..I can only assume you had a one on one with his Bob? was it in a helicopter?;)

 

Thanks for the inspiration..

On a Dylan phase.Nashville Skyline and Wesley Harding at the mo!

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, HSR said:

 ??..I can only assume you had a one on one with his Bob?

 

I'm just a very perceptive person.:rolleyes:

6 hours ago, HSR said:

was it in a helicopter?

Ya lost me...  again...

 

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For tonight's entertainment....

 

 

 

 

 

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Some long forgotten train songs there DJ360

Freight train, freight train, run so fast.

Bee-dee-dee-dee-bom-bom to San Fernando.

 

Britain's skiffle king Lonnie Donegan did some great versions of classic American railroad songs.

Here's one https://youtu.be/4jlE_rfw_14  The Wabash Cannonball.

The video link thingy appears not to be working for me today.

 

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Yes.. I had to have a couple of goes to get videos to work.  I love the skiffle fashions worn by Chas McDevitt's lads.. Baseball Boots and trousers with a waistline just below the arm pits. :laugh:.

 

I can't resist putting up this video of Elizabeth Cotton..who wrote Freight Train 'sometime between 1906 and 1912'.  Her was was gone by this time, but her guitar style is vry recognisable as similar to that used by Joan Baez and others.

 

There's a lot more on Youtube if you dig around.  She recorded a lot of stuff in the 1950s etc...sometimes with younger relatives doing vocals.

 

 

 

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I got my first guitar during the skiffle era. I was a great fan of Lonnie Donegan and learnt all of his stuff. I even built a bass using a tea chest and a broom handle, I painted it black and cut f-holes. It looked really good. My guitar tuition was from Bert Weedon’s ‘Play in a day’ tutor. A misnomer if ever there was one!

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I sort of learned to play my first guitar, a red Watkins Rapier, using Play in a Day

 

Did you have a Lagerphone to go with your tea chest bass?

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I had to look up Largerphone. Never heard of one!

My first guitar was a Spanish style followed by a Hofner Congress which I electrified. I still have that. It was many years before I acquired a Fender Stratocaster - cherry red of course. I also have a Yamaha 12 string, a folk guitar, a 5 string banjo and a ukulele. I can’t play any of them since I chopped a finger off. During lockdown I bought an electronic keyboard which looks like the flight deck of a 747. I’ve tried it once thinking I could become a piano virtuoso overnight but became downhearted when I discovered that would never happen. At least our sun lounge is now known as the music room!

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Phil, in all seriousness, do you think that one would need an ear for music? I would have loved to be able to play some sort of instrument, to be able to entertain or personal pleasure would be great. To be able to sit and strum a guitar or play a mouth organ, but I've no idea, so make do with painting. Was useless at music at school. My elder brother could play the piano and he couldn't read a note. He could listen to a piece, have a couple of practice goes and then play it. (Don't know where he learned it from, it was just a gift).

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I got an ‘O’ level in art very many years ago. I’ve never done anything remotely ‘arty’ ever since. I would like to have another go but I doubt I’d have the patience and wouldn’t know where to start. I was never particularly musical. I could read music a bit but not quickly enough to play a tune from it!

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Musical ability tends to run in families, as can artistic ability.  My mother's family members were all musical. Her father and both his sisters played the piano but could not read a note of written music. My mother had music lessons as a child from a Miss Bostock who lived on Brushfield Street. She took a couple of exams but as she grew older, wasn't willing to put in the practice.

 

I played by ear from such an early age that, like reading, I can't remember a time when I didn't do it. We had my mother's piano and the house was always full of music. All of us sang, both in amateur choirs and as soloists.

 

I didn't begin formal music lessons until I was 11.  It was necessary to have Royal Academy of Music, Associated Board grade V theory under one's belt before  starting the two year course of study for what was then GCE O level music.  I eventually worked through all 8 theory grades and all 8 practical grades.   I had started studying for the LRAM but my teacher died and I didn't persevere with it.

 

I once taught a 5 year old who could draw fully articulated figures and, according to his parents, used to get up at 5am so he could spend more time drawing. That child was very gifted. His parents were nonplussed by his ability as no one in either family was artistic.  The child, as is often the case with gifted children, was mature beyond his years and not like a child at all. He was a joy to teach!

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Many of us, myself included, would love to play music but don't really have the 'love' required. Merely being interested is not enough, you need a modicum of talent and the drive to put in the countless hours necessary to reach any sort of competency.

 

The various 'play in a day' books worked you did play in a day. they did not promise you would play well. Like Eric said the notes were not always in the right order!

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As with anything else, unless you're born with genius as some undoubtedly are, you only get out what you put in. Hours of practice, scales, arpeggios, exercises...! Most people can't spare the time/aren't sufficiently dedicated. 

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Just an addition to the superb video of Elizabeth Cotton's 'Shake Sugaree' above

 

Quote

Shake Sugaree in this 1966 recording was sung by Brenda Evans, Elizabeth's grand daughter. Elizabeth was 73 at this point. Credits by Smithsonian Folkways are given in another Youtube by the same name. Brenda was about 12 years old when the recording was made

 

What an astonishing talent and voice for a 12 year old!

 

"Have a little song
Won't take long
Sing it right
Once or twice

Oh, lordy me
Didn't I shake sugaree?
Everything I got is done and pawned
Everything I got is done and pawned

Pawn my watch
Pawn my chain
Pawn everything that was in my name

Oh, lordy me
Didn't I shake sugaree?
Everything I got is done and pawned
Everything I got is done and pawned

Pawn by buggy
Horse and cart
Pawn everything that was on my lot

Oh, lordy me
Didn't I shake sugaree?
Everything I got is done and pawned
Everything I got is done and pawned"

 

 

 

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Moving on..

Elmore James was well known as a bluesman from the 1930s.. although he also spent time as a DJ, Radio repairer etc.. since talent was no guarantee of an income for 'Black Folks' back in the Land of the Free.

 

Some credit Elmore with popularising (or even inventing) 'slide' guitar.  Eitherway many of his classic recordings have been covered by numerous later bands.and Jeremy Spencer of Peter Green's Original Fleetwood Mac did little else..

 

In the 60's I found an album called 'The Late Fantastically Great Elmore James' in a bargain bin.  I paid 24 shillings for it, still have it... and from which..

 

 

 

Well.. it makes a nice change..  :)

 

 

 

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Jill, you say, musical ability tends to run in families, the best impression I get, you are talking genetics?

 

Iv'e read many a autobiography, and exposure and opportunity appear to dismiss that theory..

 

Gaining an influence or teacher at an early age, when practice would be less of a chore appears crucial!

 

Only instrument at my school was a recorder! 

Did have some piano lessons, payed for by Gran when about 7. Actually proved useful!

 

 

 

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