mick2me

Penny Cake Shop Holgate Road/Beauvale Rd

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When I was a kid, this bakers shop sold the day before's cakes for an old penny

Yum :)

The wall on the right used to bulge from the heat of the ovens, and was great to lean against on a winters day.

I cant make out what the sign says. Can anyone help?

https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=meadows+nottingham&hl=en&ll=52.939406,-1.146435&spn=0.001956,0.005284&sll=52.998411,-1.137772&sspn=0.007865,0.021136&t=h&hnear=Meadows,+West+Bridgford,+United+Kingdom&z=18&layer=c&cbll=52.939405,-1.146476&panoid=NmpOnVu73QMF3qE_4ARA0g&cbp=12,29.05,,0,-7.36

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I think the bottom writing says BEAUVALE. I zoomed in, still trying to make out the first word, most likely the name of the shop?

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Is it 2 initials then TIMSON?

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OJ Simpson???

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I've never been in the Meadows on a Sunday morning before, so I thought I'd try it.

The shop has changed a bit even since Streetview were there

shopB.jpg

shopC.jpg

The name is definitely Timson, with either CD or CB

shopA.jpg

And Beauvale something

Satellite dishes have always been a pain........

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Timsons for sure, my Grandfather used to work for them in the 50s I think my Grandfather and old Mr Timson served together in WW1, I have spent many a happy hour in the bakery when I was a nipper and fondly remember the iced buns being iced and the long bread ovens and the long handled "shovels" the baker would put the loaves into the ovens with and as if by magic a baked loaf would be on the end of the shovel when he brought it out again, sometime in the late 50s one of the bakers was leaving to emigrate to Canada and he gave me all his small change as he would no longer need it (coppers he called it) anyway it amounted to 9d old money and consisted mainly of farthings, thought I was rich, I would be about 6 years old then, thanks for posting this thread as it has bought back some very happy memories for me

Rog

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It says Beauvale Bakery.

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the cake shop we used at netherfield was smiths bakery carnt remember having cheep cakes but some times mum would take us in there my favorite cake at the time was a wafer cake with marshmallow in the middle and chocolate on the top anyone remember them the shop was next door to reads bike shop and the sweet shop was at the other side of it.

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Babs, were they covered (sprinkled) with coconut ? if you try Google images: Marsmallow Wafer Cake it shows lots of different types, probably still available, if you're hungry............... :)

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Thanks All.

Glad it brought back memories for Rog.

I just got to find a supplier for 'Nelson Squares' now

Like a small square slab cake with currants and cake, layered between two layers of sweet pastry.

Obviously cooked on a tray and cut into squares about 3"x3"

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Hi a swap of computers means I'm just catching up on recent posts and this one really turns my mind back to 1942 as my first job on leaving school was at this bakery. The name is George Timson and if Rog's Grandfather served with him in the first world war he was in the Leicestershire Yeomanry,a cavalry regiment. John Turner, the trainee baker/roundsman I replaced when he was 'called up' to the army was unfortunately killed with the First Army in Nth. Africa. Private house deliveries were only allowed on 3 days per week so we were around Trent Boulevard area Monday, Wednesday & Friday and then the Loughboro' Rd. area of West Bridgford Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday. Several shops were supplied daily but it was a very limited range of cakes & pastries with a busy time first thing in the mornings when the bread came out of the ovens, banged out of the tins placed on racks and into the van whilst still hot. Almost everything in the bakehouse done by hand including cutting 2lb. lumps of dough, a quick check on the scales, mould by hand & into the tins to 'prove' and woe betide anyone who opened the door! Interesting job but 2 years in the the heat was enough for me.

Was the pub on the opposite corner The Sherbrooke ?

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Thanks for that Albert.

Sherbrooke sounds familiar?

Someone will no doubt confirm.

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No longer a pub!

Flats?

holgaterd-1.jpg

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There was a George Edward Trinson living at 67 Beauvale Road in 1928 according to my Kelly's directory of that date
No 67 Beauvale Road was at the Junction with Holgate Road

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Hi Albert, Thanks for bumping this topic, once again the memories come flooding back of my time spent down there, visiting my grandparents on Wilford grove, attending my first school (Colligate), playing on the Rec,in the sand pits and paddling pool, watching and listening to brass bands at the band stand of a Sunday in summer. walking round the Rock gardens and looking at the fish in their pool,

Rog

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Timpsons bakery was renamed Beauvale Bakery. My father Lucian Czapiewski bought it with a partner in the late 1950s/early 1960s. I can't remember exactly when. It became a continental bakery and he supplied shops in the east and West Midlands. The building was in a bit of a time warp for years and I used to feel as if I had been transported back to Victorian times when I was there. Also the attic was left untouched for years and like an Aladdin's cave full of old 78 records and players, gas masks, flags, an old baker's cart, loads of things - great fun. I remember sitting and watching my Dad working in the bakery, kneading two loaves at the same time, one in each hand. He was so quick. An English lady from across the road used to work in the shop which sold other food as well but you couldn't beat my Dad's bread and cakes. When Dad retired he sold it to one of his former employees, a Hungarian man. I think the Hungarian (John?) later sold it to some Italians. Fond memories.

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Remember that bakery well, the wall was warm & us kids used to lean against it to keep out the cold. The butchers across the road was called Tolsons I think, used to flog ham & bacon offcuts for next to nowt.

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Welcome Polkadot.

I also hsave fond memories of that shop, spent my dinner money there :)

Still got a sweet tooth 50 years later!

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Amazing thread this !

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The butchers shop was indeed Tolsons. The owner was called Fred. He used to work in the shop with his wife.

On the other side of the road was a green grocers which in the 1970s was owned by a Mr Lander.

Further down Holgate road / Woolmer road was a Mrs Samuels and opp her a Mrs Gill. Opp Mrs Gill was another green grocers owned by Mr Clarke ( father of Arthur and Mick Clark who went to TB school )

Happy memories!

Kind regards,

Tony

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I was just thinking back to when I first moved to Nottingham and people would come into the shop and buy potted beef cobs, freshly made there and then.I thought cob was a rather strange name for a bread roll at the time. The shop was also a grocers and you could buy single cigarettes for about three pence, I think, or maybe it was cheaper! I remember looking across the road to the Sherbrooke pub when it was still going - it was busier on a Saturday, but I don't remember it having that many customers. The Meadows itself had real character then - before all the terraced houses were demolished. I wonder if anyone remembers thePortland leisure centre when it was Portland public baths (where you actually went for a bath).

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