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Whatever happened to......?

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On 11/21/2019 at 5:27 AM, HSR said:

Gem, pure guesswork  on my behalf..The Old Malt Cross, I know St James's St really well..but when friends mention it I have no recollection!

 

2 hours ago, mercurydancer said:

The Malt Cross had a musicians gallery on the first floor. Still has. 

 

And this is what it looks like after its recent refit.   https://maltcross.com/room-hire/the-balcony

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Strange, I know but can't recall the Malt Cross..Do remember a Chinese Restaurant that would sell you a bottle of lager, I'm guessing roughly the same location below street level, well after 2am.

 

What was the name of that 'corridor pub'. Free entrance, just up from the second cookie club on St James St same side, used too attract night workers looking for a beer.l liked it in there, good fun atmosphere.

 

also the big club up the same alley but on the left,  about 3 floors, wasn't the main room dancefloor surrounded by some sort of cage?

On the top floor, they had some sort of Spanish salsa  dancing classes about 1995..last thing you want after paying an entrance fee!

3 pounds!!!

 

 

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Did anyone ever go to the surgery of Dr.Laval and Dr Stebbings? They were located on the Nottm side of Bentinck rd. and Alfreton rd.i went there with my mum when i caught those kids diseases like measles,mumps,whooping cough and dlptheria this would be between 1950-1958,i remember in the waiting there were many people it was silent with a large clock on the mantle piece ticking very loudly.The doctors made house calls in those days which was better than having to wait in that scary surgery.

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Was the surgery  in a large old house near to and on the same side as The Alma Inn?  If so, it was previously the practice of Drs Cox, who were man and wife. They also lived there and their housekeeper was a Miss Vera Smith. Vera was a friend of my relatives, Emily and George Ward who lived not far away in Garden Street. Dr. Cox, male, died and his wife retired to Mapperley Park with Vera as her companion and general factototum. It was a fractious relationship because they were both cantankerous.  Vera often spoke of that large old house where the three of them rattled around in rooms over various floors, all of which she had to clean!

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I remember Laval and Stebbings at the Health Centre on Gregory Boulevard (Mary Potter? - although I don't think it was generally called that at the time).

 

Stebbings lived on First Avenue, Sherwood Rise at the time I was living at Second Avenue. Nasty tempered old cuss out of his surgery, pleasant as anything in there - especially to private patients, which I was a couple of times when I went for a medical  prior to changing jobs.

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My father in law tells a great story about Dr Laval. He’s long dead so no harm in retelling now. Dr Laval and my wife’s grandfather who owned Flints newsagents opposite the surgery were best friends. Dr Laval didn’t own a car so in order to attend some social or other he borrowed Mr Flints car as he often did. My father in law was doing his national service in Derby at the time and used the car to get back after weekend leave so waited for the Docs return. He eventually turned up absolutely ‘as a newt’ and my father in law noticed that the car, although the same make and model was not the right one. He quickly had to drive the doc back to the pub he’d been to where he found the owner of the car pacing up and down cursing that some rotten sod had stolen his car. Mild chaos ensued and father in law had to apologise for the mistake and calm the situation while the good doc snored away in the wrong car. Eventually all was well and the owner pacified. The correct car was gathered from where the Dr Laval had parked it hours before. By the time Dr Laval had been delivered home my father in law had to drive to collect some buddies who he always gave a lift back to camp. They were fuming as he was hours late and they all got a rollocking and put on a charge for being late back. 

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Just goes to show why it's a good idea to stay away from doctors!

 

Speaking of which...I've mentioned this before but, after giving birth to me at home, 62 years and 1 day ago, my mother needed stitches.  It was 5am, dark, extremely foggy and very cold.  Mum's midwife was away and dad had already fetched the on call midwife from elsewhere in Nottingham in very poor weather conditions.  She tried to contact mum's GP but without success so it was finally arranged that she would need to go to hospital.

 

At the eleventh hour, there was a knock at the door.  In came a chap who looked resplendent in evening dress, silk muffler, black tie and who was carrying a black bag.  He almost fell into the house and was ushered upstairs.

 

This was Dr Patrick Kelly, blue eyed Irishman from the practice round the corner on Alfreton Road. He explained that he was on call and had been to a party!  Dad thought he looked a bit merry but he knelt down beside the bed, threaded up his suture and stitched up my mother.  The problem came when he tried to get up. He couldn't!  Dr Kelly suffered from lumbago and his back had locked. It took the midwife, my father and grandfather to lift him from the floor, howling in pain.  No wonder my father said he'd never forget the day I was born!

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2 hours ago, letsavagoo said:

 He eventually turned up absolutely ‘as a newt’ and my father in law noticed that the car, although the same make and model was not the right one. He quickly had to drive the doc back to the pub he’d been to where he found the owner of the car pacing up and down cursing that some rotten sod had stolen his car. 

 

Perhaps one of the improvements in modern car technology. The idea of being able to get in and drive the wrong car is (I think) something which couldn't happen today.

 

I remember stories of cars such as a Ford Cortina or Escort, where the owner could take his key, walk along a row of similar cars and find he could get in and drive several of them.

 

 

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When I worked at Boulby Mine in Yorkshire, my labourer used to give me a lift to and from work. He'd beat me through the showers as I'd have to hand over my reports etc at the maintenance window. I got outside to his car, and he told me there was an identical car to his, his door key fit the door, but the ignition key wouldn't turn, it took him a couple of minutes before he realized he wasn't in his car.

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Back in the 60’s I had a Mk 2 Healey Sprite, the key of which fitted both the door and ignition of my mother’s Wolsey Hornet. They were both BMC of course but two in one family must have been a rare coincidence.

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I have done it myself in a moggy minor  At the garage we had a board of keys if someone got locked out you took that and one of the keys would fit meeowed

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The Mk 3 Cortina could be opened with a teaspoon!

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Yes Jillit must be the same surgery but i can not remember the Alma Inn,yes do have a vague recollection of Dr Cox i think he was my Grandparents doctor.We lived at Nuthall so not too familiar with shops and pubs on Alfreton rd.and area.l know when doctor Laval made house calls he had a car it was an austin A40 Devon or Dorset depending on two doors or four doors it was a pale green,also did you know G.H Boot the motor factors on Forest rd east we brought car accessories in the sixties when my father had a garage at Watnall dont know if the they are still there now.My Grandparents both worked at Players on Radford Blvd.my grandad enjoyed his fag allowance they worked there for many years until they retired in 1963.

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In the 70s or early 80s, I believe a Dr Verma took over the practice. After that, it became a dental practice. I think the house is still there but what its current usage is, I have no idea.

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5 hours ago, Brew said:

The Mk 3 Cortina could be opened with a teaspoon!


The key to my Mk1 Escort also fitted my dad’s Ford Consul and Granada. I dare say it would also have opened many other Fords, too.

 

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The security on Ford cars during the late sixties early seventies was woeful.

Whenever I parked my Cortina when going to an away game with the Forest I used to take the rotor arm out.

All you needed to get in them was a wire coat hanger a pro could do it in seconds.

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On 12/1/2019 at 1:30 AM, IAN FINN said:

Did anyone ever go to the surgery of Dr.Laval and Dr Stebbings? They were located on the Nottm side of Bentinck rd. and Alfreton rd.i went there with my mum when i caught those kids diseases like measles,mumps,whooping cough and dlptheria this would be between 1950-1958,i remember in the waiting there were many people it was silent with a large clock on the mantle piece ticking very loudly.The doctors made house calls in those days which was better than having to wait in that scary surgery.

 

I recall Dr Stebbings well, at the Mary Potter centre well into the 80s. I Do remember him laughing when he was taking stitches out of my private parts after being bitten by a dog. 

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On 12/1/2019 at 8:35 AM, jonab said:

I remember Laval and Stebbings at the Health Centre on Gregory Boulevard (Mary Potter? - although I don't think it was generally called that at the time).

I’m 99% sure that the health centre on Gregory Boulevard was always called Mary Potter. 

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I can add the other one per cent Let's., I remember it being built. Our gp surgery was transferred there from no.2, Player street, when our doctors I think, retired. They were Dr.Hickton and Dr. Epstein as I recall. Can't remember any other gp, but I bet there was. I were only a youngster at the time. Had my very first 'flu jab there and was ill for about three weeks. Only changed my gp., when I got married in 65' and transferred to 1a, Bailey street, Basford. That was Dr. Keavney, and Dr. Keavney jnr.

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Letsavagoo is correct, it was always called The Mary Potter Health Centre. I, too, remember it being built. Walked past it every day on my way to and from Manning. 

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Whatever happened to the saying "Fred Karno's Army"? The last time I recall hearing it was when in the RAF. I was on a mobile radar unit and we would prepare for a trip to a given location  when suddenly and very frequently we would be re-directed elsewhere. Someone once said "It's like bloody Fred Karno's army is this!"

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I always thought it were Fred Karnos circus. Fred being a turn of the century comic impresario. 

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It were both Beekay. :)

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Is that where you get your jokes from? His book of humorous wittisism. :rolleyes:

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