katyjay

Famous sayings reworded

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nec equi dentes inspicere donati

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He who laughs last is just laughing out of politeness and still hasn't seen the joke.

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Nope!!

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2 minutes ago, Waddo said:

Nope!!

 

 

??

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It's ok Brew, your not going daft, i was just replying to what I thought was the translation of my reworded saying.

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We had to study Latin at school. Apparently you needed Latin to get into Oxford or Cambridge or for medical degrees. Prescriptions used to be written in an abbreviated Latin form. I find it useful for translating ancient tombstones and solving crosswords. Otherwise it's totally useless. We would say 'Latin is a language as dead as dead can be. It killed the ancient Romans and now it's killing me!

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We didn't do Latin at Roland Green school, just picked out equine dentures, donate and inspect.

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Well done Denshaw.

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Latin is a very useful language, especially for those interested in researching genealogy, ie deciphering tombstones, as philmayfield suggests but so much more. We were taught Latin by Mr Alan Langley. Nice chap who fled on hearing that the grammar school system was to be axed. I always thought he belonged in another age, teaching alongside Mr Chips (Chipping) but am grateful for what he taught me. Ambulo, ambulas, ambulat, ambulamus, ambulatis, ambulant. A very logical and useful language.

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Civis Romanus and The Shorter Latin Primer were our standard textbooks. Remember nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative and vocative. It's all coming back to me now!

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Slightly different order, PM. Nominative, vocative, accusative, genitive, dative and ablative. Our textbooks were, A Latin Primer, followed by Pseudolus Noster or Our Pseudolus. The everyday stories of a Roman boy. Still have my copy. Whoops! Must have forgotten to hand it in! Red linen-bound boards. Pre war, as was most of Manning's literature.

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@Jill SparrowWe were given 'amo'  instead of 'ambulo'  as our model....  very quick to rattle that one off!

I mainly remember reading Virgil's  Aenead part 1 for O Level.  We all had to write down the English translation dictated by the teacher and were told to learn it!!   When it came to translating a passage, we just had to work out where to start and where to finish!    

I also have a memory of our Latin teacher striding up and down the rows of desks very dramatically telling us the story of Icarus and his 'winged talaria'.  Why that has stuck in my mind I don't know...  Probably because it wasn't just 'teaching from the front' 

I love Latin because the grammar is so straightforward

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I had the option to drop Latin when we split in arts and science groups from the fourth to the sixth forms so I went for science. If I’d gone for arts I might have become a lawyer or an accountant! I only took up engineering in the last 25 years of employment. 

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During the very first Latin lesson, our teacher sat on a chair and said "Sedeo". He then stood up and said, "Surgo". He then walked the length of the classroom, saying "Ambulo" as he went. Lastly, he turned round and walked back to his chair, saying "Revenio".

 

I have never forgotten that performance.

 

Our O level text was Ovid's Metamorphoses. Ovid, we discovered, was renowned for his racier scribblings, which were not prescribed reading for young ladies.

 

Alan Langley left us a couple of terms before our O level exam and was replaced by a very young, presumably NQT, lady who tried to change the pronunciation we had been taught, amongst other issues. This caused confusion and had a deleterious effect on our results.

 

That aside, I have found Latin a very useful language.

 

I also remember playing the role of the she wolf in a Latin play about Romulus and Remus! A lady wolf who spoke Latin! Ecce!

 

In addition, at Christmas, we sang Latin carols just as the German students sang German carols and the Spanish group sang Spanish carols. We all sang French carols, usually the very boring Il est nee, le divin enfant. I preferred the German carols

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@Jill Sparrow  your memories of your first Latin lesson certainly show how effective a bit of simple drams can be

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Every girl in the Latin group was given a Latin name which was always used during our lessons. Mine was Passer - the Sparrow is a member of the avian family of Passeriformes. My good friend Denise Chambers was renamed Conclave.  Our teacher was always referred to as Magister.

 

Similarly, we all had French names for use during French lessons. Mine was Lisette.

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