Things you don't see anymore


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That Marsdens was in Bulwell market and the Manager was Jack Pinder.........it closed in the mid 60s when they opened 'Savemore'' on main street,,,One of the ladies from there is 'friends' with me on facebook after seeing my remarks about Marsdens shops,,,Ivy and June were also real people and lovely,,.......just been thinking both would be in their 90s now......bless em xx

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Some folks only request information, which is fair enough by me. Maybe they don't want discussion, chat, banter etc. Different people want different things from a forum, and that's fine.  If

Things you don’t see anymore (times 2) A 1945 photo of my aunt, wearing a turban and scrubbing her front door step on Queens Grove, Meadows. She dug her heels in and refused to move when the

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Men's stud on shirt collars. Must have been mentioned before. Was this an era when it was more important to look clean than actually being clean? Were the shirts worn for a few days/weeks but sporting a nicely ironed clean collar? 

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The only person who I remember doing collar changing was my grandad who lived at Grimston Road, Radford. I was always fascinated by that because I never came across it anywhere else.

 

And to tie in with the other point, in all the time they lived at that house never had a bath or a bathroom. I believe they had a portable tin bath - but I never actually saw it.

 

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Again Nottstalgia has made me feel really old, I can remember when I started on the Fire Brigade in 1965 I was issued with blue shirts and separate collars. I had to go and buy studs something I had never used before. I think the shirts must have been stock left over from the war production and we had to have them to stop waste. 

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Men always used to wear a tie. Even on the factory floor. You also wore one to designate the regiment you served in or what club or association you were a member of. The last time I wore a tie was at a wedding some years ago and only then because it was a semi formal occasion.  A tie nowadays is a completely useless and outdated item as indeed are shoes with laces and trilby hats!

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Never thought i'd get used to not wearing a Tie.......but being a Laryngetomee it would not be wise,,,must admit after two years don't miss them,,,and enjoy all the different Neckerchiefs,,which i wear all the time,,,got one on now as i type this....It covers my 'Stoma' and Button for speaking....i am vain (vane)? and enjoy the look on peoples face when i speak,,sounds very much like my old voice but deeper......amazing what we get used to,,,

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I used to wear a cravat way, way back. It's just an open necked check shirt, old trousers or jeans and a gillet with lots of pockets to carry all my impedimentia now. The days of smart suits are long gone. I even wear a baseball cap when on the tractor. How times have changed. I don't need to dress to impress, I feel comfortable being scruffy.

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Phil, we’ll easily recognise you then if you get to a meet up!   If ANY of us ever get to see each other again....

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3 hours ago, Cliff Ton said:

The only person who I remember doing collar changing was my grandad who lived at Grimston Road, Radford.

 

And to tie in with the other point, in all the time they lived at that house never had a bath or a bathroom. I believe they had a portable tin bath - but I never actually saw it.

 

As you know CT I was born and lived on Grimston Road near your grandparents. The back upstairs room above the kitchen was our bathroom. I believe but am not certain it was always a bathroom as the hot water cylinder was in a cupboard in the corner with the airing cupboard. However that only left 2 bedrooms so I slept in a crib in the second bedroom with my older sister. I learned how to drop the side of the crib and I get in bed with her for warmth and it was decided I needed my own room. So the bath was moved downstairs into the pantry at the end of the kitchen. I remember watching the workmen lowering the cast iron bath, sliding it down a ladder from the back window having taken the sash windows out. The former bathroom became my bedroom but lord, was it cold. Later many people built flat roof extensions at the back for a better bathroom and inside lav. We still had the outside privy in 1971 when we moved out.

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41 minutes ago, MargieH said:

Phil, we’ll easily recognise you then if you get to a meet up!   If ANY of us ever get to see each other again....

Wots a "meet-up" Margie? :rolleyes:

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I remember several friends who lived in houses where one had to walk through a bedroom to get to the bathroom...and no, it wasn't an ensuite!  The houses were built without bathrooms and the smallest bedroom had been converted. I always thought it was an odd arrangement.

 

In answer to your question Ian Finn, no the bath doesn't freeze in winter because it's full of coal! :blink:

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-54518336

 

This photo has made my morning!  As we all know, I'm potty about cats of all sizes, but this just sums up the way I feel about what we're doing to our world. Let's hope these beautiful creatures don't become things we don't see anymore.

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Lovely picture it is too Jill..............I had a photo i had taken myself of our 3 cats in the 80s sharing their food with two Foxes on our Garden.....love to find it.....

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13 hours ago, letsavagoo said:

As you know CT I was born and lived on Grimston Road near your grandparents. The back upstairs room above the kitchen was our bathroom.

 

I know the layout you mean, and that was always a bedroom at my grandparent's house. It remained 3-bedroomed as built, whereas yours was obviously 'modernised'.

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Locks on internal doors. Our house on Peveril St had mortice locks on all bedroom doors.

We had 4 large bedrooms but only a tiny scullery and outside loo. The tiny scullery contained a cast iron gas stove, A sink with only cold water. A copper boiler in the corner, a mangle and dolly tub. There was just enough room for a small table for food preparation. The tin bath was hung up in the cellar stair head. How on earth did we manage?

Our current house has locks on all internal doors but it is about 400 years old.

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