Old Streets of Nottingham


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Here's a link to an article on the Post website regarding old streets in Nottingham together with some photos.

https://www.nottinghampost.com/news/history/35-streets-originally-made-up-1664361

 

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Mine is OK when using the link on the quoted post, but I can't get the original one to work.....  what's going on there, then?

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David, Absolutely brilliant link. I have just spent half an hour scanning through it and the information is great. When you click on the little 'Read More' links it just leads on and on with more information about specific items. I have had to stop now, but saved the link for later, so I can read it properly. Best find for ages. I'm sure it will be enjoyed by many.Thank you for  not letting us miss that one Miduck.

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Excellent find, thanks a million.

Only had a quick look so far but one point I would raise is the naming of Fletcher Gate. The article says the name derives from it once being the street of 'fleshers', or butchers. I always understood it was the street of fletchers, that is to say, arrow makers. I have no historical basis for this except the etymology and the importance of the arrow in Nottingham's past - even if it's only mythology!

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The larger building here on Halifax Place was bought not long after this by a very good friend of ours and turned into apartments and offices.  He was one of the first developers to buy old Lace Market buildings and turn them into accommodation.  They still live in the building too,. 

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2 hours ago, jonab said:

Excellent find, thanks a million.

Only had a quick look so far but one point I would raise is the naming of Fletcher Gate. The article says the name derives from it once being the street of 'fleshers', or butchers. I always understood it was the street of fletchers, that is to say, arrow makers. I have no historical basis for this except the etymology and the importance of the arrow in Nottingham's past - even if it's only mythology!

It's from the German (Anglo-Saxon to be pedantic) "fleischhauer" or flesh-hewer. Gate is the Danish word for street.

 

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I'm not denying the definition, it's just that, as a child, I was told by my granny that Fletcher Gate was the street where Robin Hood's arrows were made. That fitted with the meaning of "fletcher".

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On 6/23/2018 at 1:18 PM, jonab said:

I'm not denying the definition, it's just that, as a child, I was told by my granny that Fletcher Gate was the street where Robin Hood's arrows were made. That fitted with the meaning of "fletcher".

A fletcher was indeed an arrow maker jonab but Robin Hood was a myth & anyway he came from Yorkshire !

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Yorkshire ! That'll set the cat amongst the pigeons !  Maybe, but in those days, Sherwood Forest stretched well into South Yorkshire.

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Why do you think Robin Hood was a myth, Mick?  I'm not trying to be argumentative. It's just that most Nottinghamians seemed to believe in him.  I never heard it questioned while I lived there.  Things can be exaggerated, but it seems like there was some good reasons to believe it.  Is there anything in Nottingham's original history?

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10 hours ago, catfan said:

A fletcher was indeed an arrow maker jonab but Robin Hood was a myth & anyway he came from Yorkshire !

 I don't think that a grandmother's explanation of the meaning of one word to a small child is sufficient basis for a discussion on the mythology, or otherwise, of Robin Hood.

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That is a brilliant link David. I have it in my favourites and quite often just spend a while reading through it. So much information on Nottingham, not only streets but people, places and lots of other interesting bits of knowledge. If you want to know anything you can usually find it on that link somewhere.

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Just had a read about Pennyfoot Stile Ian.  Courtesy of Nottinghamshire History. Very interesting. Thanks for the tip. I enjoy  NH and was going to add the entry about the stile from the website but was worried about the rules of copyright, so I haven't added it.

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Was not Cliff road at one time river lean,? and  above the steps was this the Galley's  of Justice?.

I think that these are the steps are the ones that the prisoner's used to go down to the boat for transportation to Australia.

 

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Whilst I agree about these quaint areas being potential tourist traps I have no doubt I would be joining in the chorus of protest about the ruination and commercialisation of Nottingham's heritage if it were so.

I worked on Fletcher Gate for awhile and walked up Drury Hill and the steps up to Weekday Cross every day. When they pulled it down there were no protests, no demonstrations , everyone in my experience thought it was OK and looked forward to something 'new, modern and state of the art' to make tired old Nottingham a better, brighter place.

It was of its age. Sadly they got it wrong and are now tearing it down and starting again but in 50/100 years time will they be mourning the destruction of the post nuclear brutilist architecture of Broad Marsh etc?

I'm not having a go at you and I'm no lover of the council and some of their decisions but hindsight is a wonderful thing.

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The electorate of Nottingham voted in those ‘idiots’, so who is really to blame? I find that from parish council level, through district and county councils right up to Parliament it’s only a certain ‘type’ of person who puts themselves up for election. Most of us just get on with earning a living. Do these people have a dedication to public service or do they want recognition that they can’t achieve by honest graft?

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