letsavagoo

Pronouncing place names (and how to eat food politely)

Recommended Posts

The other night I was watching Notts TV and they mentioned Wollaton. They pronounced it WOL AT ON not WOOL at on. I might be petty but it really peed me off that they hadn't said it correctly. But then my wife put a spanner in the works by saying maybe that is the way to say it but we (Radford gutter snipes) say it incorrectly. She's Barmy of course but why do we say it the way we do. Other locations in my present area have similar ways of pronouncing their names. Averham near Newark (Air ham) and Hallam (Hailam). Southwell often spoken as both South well and Suthell. I always use the South well variant as I live near but previously always said Suthell as that's the way my dad told me it was pronounced.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree entirely. I deplore incorrect pronunciation especially by local reporters. Another couple that springs to mind are Rainworth, a lot of folk pronounce it as Renn oth. Then there is Blidworth which some pronounce as Blidd eth. Confusing to say the least.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Southwell is Southwell, my sister will kill you if you say it otherwise, which every BBC racing blokey pronounces suthall (and you have Southall in London) and Colwick (COLLICK) which is often pronounced COL WICK. I would say 'Renn oth' and 'Blidd eth' are correct pronunciations. There's a place I have to deal with in Norfolk called Costessey and the locals call it 'kossy'.

Gudinit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank Goodness we don't live in villages I've seen on my travels.

Twatt in Scotland, Booze and Crack Pot in North Yorkshire.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try Happisburgh in Norfolk and Barnoldswick in Pendle. I reckon the locals just make it up to confuse the visitors. And in Northumberland, they call Bellingham, and all of the other places ending in 'ingham', as 'Bellinjam'. Nottingjam, anyone?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rawtenstall in Lancashire is another oddity pronounced Rotten Stall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where I live seems to flummox some people. Basford is pronounced Base Ford, not Bass Ford.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another good example is Attenborough ....often pronounced as Atten Bruff. Anything that ends with borough seems to throw people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BeestonMick, we have a quarry at Costessey and throughout the company we all call it Kossy

Rog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ValuerJim #5

In the early seventies I was sent from Derby to Barnoldswick to do some metrology on some components. On my first visit I phoned the guy in the engineering department who I was supposed to meet and he said he would meet me at the main gate at "Barlick". After getting to the general area and asking for directions it took me quite a while to cotton on to the fact that "Barlick" was the local pronunciation of Barnoldswick.

Fly2 #2

Renn-uth and Blid-uth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People say "Middlesborough" but it's "Middlesbru"

There's some tongue twisters this side of the pond, probably due to places taking Native American names...And down under even worse!! Try Bulli for starters..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't Beaver Castle spelled Belvoir Castle??? Norman in origin, so correctly Belvoir.??

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another one from Norflok - Wymondham, pronounced 'Windum'

Bury, Greater Manchester - pronounced 'Burry'.

Yr Wyddgrug - pronounced 'Mold'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...or Amwythig pronounced Shrewsbury ! Also Llandrindod is usually referred to locally as Landod (no Welsh pronunciation of the initial "Ll").

Foreign translations of well-known place names are a bit of a nightmare. I remember waiting at Rimini for a train to Munich. We were expecting the German version, but then the indicator flashed up "Monaco di Baviera" - which rather threw us.

Lincolnshire also has a few oddities. Locals pronounce Threekingham (which used to have a pub called the "Three Kings") as Threckingham. Aslackby is Azleby (long A), and Kirkby la Thorpe = Kirby Laythorp (with the stress on the Lay). Not to mention Leicestershire's Sproxton = Spro'son.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had friends once live in Portesham, pronounced by the locals as Possum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Stephen many city names change in the translation. Nice becomes Nizza. Surnames its guess who, Hughes becomes juugs.

Some letters are missing from the italian alphabet and when theres an english letter they dont know how to pronounce it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to describe how you say the Welsh Ll... as in Llan.... But visualize "Clan" Now the Ll is said with the tongue in the roof of your mouth and say cccclan, that's the best I can describe as, it flows off the tongue easily with practice...Can't for the life of me taught me how to say it, must have been a Welshman though.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now